Router Forums - Reply to Topic
Thread: Have you ever considered turning your hobby into a business? Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-17-2018 09:03 PM
MEBCWD
Quote:
Originally Posted by RainMan 2.0 View Post
That’s my concern also . Even if you patent a product , there’s no protection from overseas ,just America .
If you did have a patent on a product that someone decided to copy inside the US you still have to take them to court so you can protect your product and possibly gain part of the profits they made selling the item. I know one person that did patent a product and had 2 different people try to copy his design. He did take them to court and in one case was given all documented sales form the item plus damages, in the other case they gave him damages with nothing related to lost sales because that individual did not keep any records of his sales. The lawyer also requested court costs and his fees be paid by the defendant.

So remember the patent will not be any good unless you go after the individuals that are copying the design and sometimes you will have to pay attorney fees.
07-17-2018 06:46 PM
RainMan 2.0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garyk View Post
If whatever idea you come up with catches fire you can bet you will have a competitor in China that can make it quicker and cheaper to sell at Wal-Mart. We came up with a few unique ideas when we tried craft shows but it didn't take too long for the competition to duplicate our product (a cheaper version of course) and kill our market. You can make some money but staying ahead of the curve is difficult. A lot depends on your personal "aggravation" level.
That’s my concern also . Even if you patent a product , there’s no protection from overseas ,just America .
07-16-2018 09:07 PM
DaninVan I'm with the 'When Hell Freezes' group.
I turned my business into a hobby. Less work, less stress and most definitely less money.
07-16-2018 10:47 AM
Garyk If whatever idea you come up with catches fire you can bet you will have a competitor in China that can make it quicker and cheaper to sell at Wal-Mart. We came up with a few unique ideas when we tried craft shows but it didn't take too long for the competition to duplicate our product (a cheaper version of course) and kill our market. You can make some money but staying ahead of the curve is difficult. A lot depends on your personal "aggravation" level.
07-13-2018 09:43 AM
Terry Q I’ve often thought that opening a “storefront” business because it’s a hobby has always been a silly thing to do.

If you are a fisherman and enjoy fishing, why would you want to own a retail business that would tie you down to your store at the peak of the season when everyone expects you to be open.

Same with skis, bikes, golf and lots of other hobbies.

Woodworking would allow more flexibility and there is no “season” and no set hours so it would be a slightly different circumstances, but there are plenty of hobbies that would suffer if you turned them into a business.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
07-12-2018 04:47 PM
RainMan 2.0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Howe View Post
You might surprise yourself, Rick. I know guys making 50+K per year making signs. Some aren't even using a CNC. Just a router.
I’d be more than happy to make half that. Anything beats being a door man at Home Depot .
Disclaimer: If any of one our members are employed at Home Depot , I’m sure it’s a nice place to work
07-12-2018 03:29 PM
honesttjohn I sell stuff just to get rid of it. We'd never use or give away everything I've made. Then there's a little bit if the challenge thing. Keeps the mind busy, the body limber going up and down the stairs 30-50 times a day, and helps pay for the materials to make what I really want to.

Learning this new stuff ain't easy for an old mind. But it helps to keep in the loop, if even a little bit.

But ............. there is that little inner glow when someone wants what you have made, and actually wants to give you money for it.
07-12-2018 01:00 PM
MEBCWD
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cricket View Post
Attachment 357679



Have you ever considered turning your hobby into a business?
Sounds like work to me!

I am retired and I do make a little money in woodworking but it is work when you have a project that someone commissions and you really don't like the project. You are always thinking about projects you would rather be doing that you have designed but can't find the time to do projects for yourself.

When one of the local woodworking stores gives a customer my contact information I usually try to make sure they get their project made. When they have been turned down by every other woodworker in the area because they do not want the headaches of a complicated project it makes it hard to turn down the project.

If someone has been referred to the CNC User Group to get a project made I try to make sure they get the work done. If no one else in the group wants to take on the project I usually do it so the club keeps a good standing in the community.

I do have regular customers that I do work for but they know that it is not a drop everything for their project situation. I do custom inlays for one customer for his end-grained cutting board business and these are usually a quick job that can be done between other jobs. Two or three times a year I do several standard inlay boards at a time and that goes quickly, design are already finished and toolpaths already run and tested. Always have a nice long leadtime on these stanard designs so I don't feel backed into a corner.

I do CNC design files for other people that don't like the computer time, just don't want to learn the software or need help to resolve problems with design files. These jobs are usually done with the knowledge that they will be done after current jobs are finished and not be done as priorities over current jobs.

It is surprising how easy it is to build something you want to make and the feeling you have at the end of the day in your shop is a lot different than the feeling you have if you have to make something.
07-12-2018 12:30 PM
Gene Howe You might surprise yourself, Rick. I know guys making 50+K per year making signs. Some aren't even using a CNC. Just a router.
07-12-2018 12:19 PM
RainMan 2.0 Well I’m going to be looking for a new occupation next year ,and was hoping to make enough to stay alive making and designing 3D wood engravings , signs etc , with a CNC router table .
I don’t think it’s a viable plan from the research I’ve done , but I’d like to own one regardless , as the potential is probably there to make a few bucks. But I suspect I’ll never pay the machine and software off itself after spending 20K .
Will have a cool looking machine though ,and it’s also about learning and having fun to .

I’m also a little concerned with the cost of materials here, as things are pricey in western Canada .
There is a private wood mill about 20 minutes from my house , so that may offset costs a little .

If it doesn’t work out , I’ll find some other part time work in my field , and maybe make a few bucks with it at some point .
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome