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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-16-2019 10:10 PM
Stick486 use a step bit like a Unibit...
they go up to 1 1/8''....
when you get to the correct size and have a counter-bore for a guide switch to a fostner..
01-16-2019 09:22 PM
bfblack The fact that your solution works for your intended application is what counts. If having the hole perpendicular to the surface of the work piece is very important, then you can use a plunge router to drill the final hole. Chuck a 3/16" bit in your plunge router and place the router bit in the existing pilot hole. Build a fence around the router; two sides minimum and taking into account the direction of movement of the router on startup. Replace the 3/16" bit with a 1" bit and drill the 1" hole. Your solution is simpler than mine.
01-12-2019 12:08 PM
CharleyL I can see where Stick's method of using two hole saws with the smaller one being a guide for the larger one will work well for some situations. For small holes that need to be opened up and kept on the same center, I use a step drill bit to open the surface to the the size needed and then use a straight drill bit of that size to clean out the smaller diameter steps, if the piece being drilled is too thick for one step of the bit to cut completely through.

For drilling larger holes I have Forstner bits in 1/8" steps from 1/4" up to 3 1/2". By using a scrap piece already drilled to the diameter needed and clamped in place to use as a guide for the desired size Forstner bit, I can drill out a hole to the new diameter, up to 3 1/2". Beyond that I resort to a router, 1/4" bit, and usually my CRB7 jig. I can go to over 4' diameter using that.

Many ways to get this done.

Charley
01-12-2019 04:07 AM
Stick486 the smaller holesaw is the pilot/guide for the larger holesaw...



Plan ''D''...
register a drill guide...
clamp in/to what needs to be drilled...
switch registering bit/pin to desired size of fostner...
bore away...

.
01-12-2019 03:46 AM
Cherryville Chuck The hole saw works as long as the pilot hole used to cut the shelf rounds isn't already larger than the bit on the hole saw. The Milescraft tool could work if it was already larger as would my method. The Milescraft jig was suggested once as a way to drill dog holes in a bench or holes in a sheet of ply where you still need vertical accuracy and if you have a job for one and buy it then you've pretty much paid for it on the first use. I look at a lot of tool purchases that way.

As usual plans B and C prove that there is almost always several ways to do a job. In the end it usually boils down to the tools you have to work with, your experience and knowledge, and often how much money and time it will cost.
01-12-2019 12:33 AM
tomp913 Guess this is Plan "B"

https://www.amazon.com/wolfcraft-452.../dp/B000JCIMEA

- Chuck a bit the same diameter as the original pilot hole in the drill, set the guide on the part and start the bit in the pilot hole.

- Screw the base of the guide to the part (assuming that you have the underside up).

- Remove the pilot drill, chuck up the larger bit and drill the required hole.

Guess this assumes that you have one of the guides.
01-11-2019 07:33 PM
Nickp
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
I bought one of those for my son for Christmas. I suppose another method would be drilling out the pilot hole to match the bit on the hole saw (I think they are either 1/4" or 5/16" in that size cutter) and then using it. The Forstner I used did a really smooth job of it. A little better than a hole saw would have done but that isn't a big deal in this situation. I posted this as much for the concept of how to locate the 2 holes in the same place as much as the job itself.
Good thing you didn't have to go for a Woodpeckers jig...

Nice approach...will keep this in mind for "bigger than throat" projects...thanks
01-11-2019 06:03 PM
JIMMIEM Would plan C be a combination of a rabbeting bit and a flush trim bit. Rabbeting bit to enlarge the hole halfway and then the flush trim bit to enlarge the other half to the same size as the first half?
01-11-2019 04:32 PM
Stick486 just offered a plan '' B''...
01-11-2019 04:02 PM
Cherryville Chuck I bought one of those for my son for Christmas. I suppose another method would be drilling out the pilot hole to match the bit on the hole saw (I think they are either 1/4" or 5/16" in that size cutter) and then using it. The Forstner I used did a really smooth job of it. A little better than a hole saw would have done but that isn't a big deal in this situation. I posted this as much for the concept of how to locate the 2 holes in the same place as much as the job itself.
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