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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-06-2019 06:32 PM
johnjory My comment about Lenox Tri-master bandsaw blades is really more about the retailers. I was doing a lot of resawing and decided to pop for one figuring the price to be about $150 for a 105” blade. (My saw is a 14” Delta with a riser block.) I looked up who in the area carried or sold Lenox and Fastenal was the closest place (I live in So Oregon) and it was listed as also being certified welder of Lenox blades. I was quoted $255. I thought that was wrong so the salesman double checked—Yes $255 was the price. I a cheap so I didn’t buy it.

At home I got online again, found all the placed that sold Lenox and started calling. Here are the prices I was quoted:
Fastenal in Phoenix Oregon $255, Bandsawbladeking.com $211, Bandsawbladeking.com $211, Bandsawbladesdirect.com $153.72, Spectrum Supply $130.88, Hastingssaws.com $135.51 (free shipping on orders over $75), Airgas in Medford OR $195, Motion Industries also in Medford OR $171.59.

Keep in mind none of them had the blade in stock and would order it for me from Lenox. I took the various quotes to Fastenal because I have used them before and they are convenient. The answer was well the price is the price we don’t sell much Lenox pick a different brand.

I ordered it from Hastingssaws.com in California and am very pleased with their service and with the blade.

I offer one other suggestion. If you are not resawing a lot try the Highland Hardware “wood slicer” blade. It is not carbide but it has a thinner kerf and cuts very well. I just hate changing bandsaw blades since I must readjust my rip fence every time I install a new blade. I have used all the setup tricks that have been written about not needing to adjust for drift if the saw is set up correctly—bullsh***.
12-06-2014 04:27 PM
Phil P
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bowen View Post
I talked at length to a tech support person at Lenox before buying the blade and was never told that the blade was primarily designed for cutting metal.
Hi Jerry

You maybe didn't know it, but when you get into big saws (over 20in and running 1-1/4in or wider blades) it is easily possible if you are careless to crank-on so much tension that you rip the blades apart, normally at the weld. The saw I was referring to had got an unreliable tension indicator, so a Starrett tension gauge was a good way to approach it (first a blade is on, after that we just referred to settings we noted in a book). The thicker body material of a 1-1/4in TCT blade over a carbon steel or bi-metallic means that it needs a fair amount of tension to pull it straight, especially if the saw in question is run with a power stock feeder a lot of the time. Feeding hardwoods at 3 to 5 metres/min can tend to bow the blade (sometimes in two axis) unless you work to the manufacturers spec regarding tension. Hand feeding creates fewer issues and in any case you can easily see if you don't have sufficient tension by sawing a tall piece then checking if the sawn face is flat or not - if it is convex or concave you don't have enough tension

I was buying these blades in the late 1990s when they were new on the market over here and when there was absolutely no competition. It was the rep who told me who their main customers were for the blades - a couple of aerospace firms and a metals recycler - and that their uses were the rasion d'etre for these blades. They were very surprised when I ordered my first pair of blades and told them what I intended to use them for

Regards

Phil
12-06-2014 12:34 PM
Jerry Bowen
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
When I bought some Tri Master blades a number of years back the rep actually delivered them to my shop because they were pretty rare in the UK at that time (still are) and he wanted to see why a woodworker was buying carbide-tipped sawblades. These blades were/are generally only sold to the people who break-down aluminium engine blocks for scrap or saw-up aluminium or dural billets into chunks for the aerospace industries over here (partly cost, partly that few woodworkers know about them). One of his concerns was that because the blades are relatively thick against standard bimetallic or carbon steel blades I wouldn't be able to get enough tension on them - and they cut a lot more smoothly if they are correctly tensioned. Fortunately they were going onto a large bandsaw (28in wheels) and it could give me the right tension, as read by a Starrett tension gauge, but he did warn me about taking the tension off when the saw isn't in use. If you don't you can bend the frame of the machine (at least with fabricated steel machines - the older solid cast iron saws are better), you can also put flats on the tyres which makes for vibrations and the bearing life will be unduly shortened if they are kept under pressure the whole time. I tried the 1in and 1-1/4in blades in fixed pitch and variable pitch - the vari pitch was great for ripping hardwood veneers. Lenox struck me as being very good on customer service - the rep made the delivery despite the order being placed through an agent - and he periodicaly used to contact me to see how they were working

Regards

Phil

Phil, my question is about the tension. I am finding that my blade does not require anymore tension than a normal BS blade and cuts fine. By fine I mean that my re-saw cuts are clean a perfectly straight. I see no reason for excdssive tension so far, let me know what you find out about he tension on your saw.

I talked at length to a tech support person at Lenox before buying the blade and was never told that the blade was primarily designed for cutting metal.

Jerry
12-06-2014 10:02 AM
Phil P When I bought some Tri Master blades a number of years back the rep actually delivered them to my shop because they were pretty rare in the UK at that time (still are) and he wanted to see why a woodworker was buying carbide-tipped sawblades. These blades were/are generally only sold to the people who break-down aluminium engine blocks for scrap or saw-up aluminium or dural billets into chunks for the aerospace industries over here (partly cost, partly that few woodworkers know about them). One of his concerns was that because the blades are relatively thick against standard bimetallic or carbon steel blades I wouldn't be able to get enough tension on them - and they cut a lot more smoothly if they are correctly tensioned. Fortunately they were going onto a large bandsaw (28in wheels) and it could give me the right tension, as read by a Starrett tension gauge, but he did warn me about taking the tension off when the saw isn't in use. If you don't you can bend the frame of the machine (at least with fabricated steel machines - the older solid cast iron saws are better), you can also put flats on the tyres which makes for vibrations and the bearing life will be unduly shortened if they are kept under pressure the whole time. I tried the 1in and 1-1/4in blades in fixed pitch and variable pitch - the vari pitch was great for ripping hardwood veneers. Lenox struck me as being very good on customer service - the rep made the delivery despite the order being placed through an agent - and he periodicaly used to contact me to see how they were working

Regards

Phil
12-06-2014 08:54 AM
chessnut2 Jerry.....it's nice to hear that you had a good experience with them. Too many companies seem to have adopted the motto "The customer is always wrong", and I think it has made most of us a little gun-shy about lodging a complaint or question. Please do let us know how the visit goes. Jim
12-05-2014 06:49 PM
Jerry Bowen
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Stoops View Post
Oops, maybe I didn't get the same ones. I remember I was looking at them,along with others, but here is what I have.
They were only 24.50 for 108" length.

Herb
Herb,
No, probably not the same ones but I bet that the ones you got will work just fine.

Let us know how they work for you, O.K.?

Jerry
12-05-2014 06:02 PM
Herb Stoops Oops, maybe I didn't get the same ones. I remember I was looking at them,along with others, but here is what I have.
They were only 24.50 for 108" length.

Herb



Message edited to remove picture at poster request.
12-05-2014 01:24 PM
Jerry Bowen
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Stoops View Post
Good to know ,I just bought 3 of those blades for resawing.
Herb
Did you buy the Tri Master or the Bi Metal. Both are great blades. I don't find that the Tri Master cuts any faster than a Timber Wolf blade but it should last almost forever. The cut does almost rival that of a table saw blade, you will like them.

Jerry
12-05-2014 01:18 PM
Herb Stoops Good to know ,I just bought 3 of those blades for resawing.
Herb
12-05-2014 09:25 AM
MAFoElffen
Quote:
Originally Posted by kp91 View Post
glad to hear there is good customer service out there! Can't wait to hear about your visit if he stops by your shop in the spring.
+1
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