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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-28-2011 10:09 AM
Mark Mayo I like the term

"waterproofocity".
02-21-2011 11:57 AM
Ralph Barker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tripp1 View Post
Anything to get a away from the 6 coats+ of the urethane I tried before
Thanks, I'll try it.....T
Forgot to mention - a "one-pound cut" is usually what is recommended for sealing purposes. The initial coat can be quite liberal, since it soaks in nicely, and dries within a few minutes under normal environmental circumstances. Be sure to cover all the edges, too. I usually let the second coat dry overnight, and then do a light sanding with 400 grit on the finish sander.

Bob also brings up a good point - a light coat of wax, buffed well, can help to further reduce friction and enhance the "waterproofocity".
02-20-2011 08:00 PM
bobj3 Hi

1/4" and 1/2" thick MDF works the best for me,,some of the guides are to long for the 1/4" MDF, if you have a error with water a coat or two with Johnson floor wax will fix that, and it drys very quick...do this for a quick test, put some on scrap MDF around the shop wait about 30 mins. than pour some water on the stock and watch it run off just like water off a ducks back..the wax will seal it.

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02-20-2011 06:53 PM
Tripp1 Anything to get a away from the 6 coats+ of the urethane I tried before
Thanks, I'll try it.....T
02-20-2011 06:24 PM
Ralph Barker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tripp1 View Post
Won't MDF eventually swell with temp and humidity changes?
And if so, I assume sealing it would be the only answer, and we all know how long it takes to seal mdf with some urethane.....seems like forever
A couple of coats of de-waxed shellac, which dries very quickly, works pretty well.
02-20-2011 05:58 PM
Tripp1 Won't MDF eventually swell with temp and humidity changes?
And if so, I assume sealing it would be the only answer, and we all know how long it takes to seal mdf with some urethane.....seems like forever
02-15-2011 05:26 PM
dr4g0nfly Depending upon the size of the template to be made, smaller ones I like to use the laminate floor stuff. A pack is not expensive and lasts for loads of jobs, it has a hard wearing surface (the floor side) and the underside is MDF or a similar material, if you buy the bathroom version the MDF is Green - which identifies it as being 'Waterproof'.
02-03-2011 04:51 PM
jschaben
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Mayo View Post
What do you cut lexan with? Please answer table saw blade and how do you route the template - same way as mdf?
Hi Mark, I been cutting it on a table saw. Two passes, first a bit over half the thickness, flip it end for end and finish with the second pass. Eliminates a lot of chipout. Tricky on thin stuff as it likes to "ride" the blade.
02-03-2011 03:42 PM
Racer2007 Drill press at slow speed.
02-03-2011 02:24 PM
allthunbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Mayo View Post
What do you cut lexan with? Please answer table saw blade and how do you route the template - same way as mdf?
Hi Mark:

As per Bob3J's comments. Most blades and bits will work with polycarbonates. Slow speed = yes. However, setup and practice your cut first, before actually doing it. What I do is set everything up except the bit height. I practice pushing the stock through. Here's what you're trying to do. If you set the bit speed too fast, it will melt the plastic. If you push the stock through too slow, you'll melt the plastic. Take the cut in small increments and don't dally when pushing the stock through. Make sure you've got "the right" push sticks etc. to push down and through and that your outfeed is not obstructed. Do not pause to reposition your hands etc. If you cannot do it in one deliberate pass, setup the torsion table and do it there with a straight edge and an edge guide.
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