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Thread: Rail/Stile speed/passes? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-01-2011 01:42 PM
mac_y44 This is the kind of info I need also. 1 pass, 2 pass? hp of router, all good for the beginner. Reading is cheaper than buying tools that won't do the job.

QUOTE=bobj3;221942]HI


The real pro's make more that one pass (Sommerfeld/Norm) for just two of them many of this high end bits come with two bearings just for that type of job..

By the way I don't see your Web site anymore ,what's up with that ?

===[/QUOTE]
01-31-2011 08:32 PM
bobj3 HI


The real pro's make more that one pass (Sommerfeld/Norm) for just two of them many of this high end bits come with two bearings just for that type of job..

By the way I don't see your Web site anymore ,what's up with that ?

As far as the cheaper bits ,I would stack up the Katana (MLCS) to any of the other high end bits..they are that good and you always get FREE shipping that's a real plus in my book..

Katana ▼
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shops...es/kathome.htm


===



Quote:
Originally Posted by dovetail_65 View Post
Yeah I never use multiple passes for door parts on anything except maybe the deeper raised panel profiles. Really for those those I just use the shaper.

If your router is sized properly for the bits and the bits are quality you should not need multiple pases or even have to sand much if at all.

This is one area cheaper bits show their weakness. I use the cheap bits a lot, but for door parts use the best money can buy. There is substantial difference in quality of cut and the speed and depth at which you can make those cuts between when using quality bits. Pretty much for those type bits, door rail and stile and panel raisers you get what you pay for.

I would rather have better bits and a lower quality router than bad bits and a great router. I have found that the better more expensive bits for door making really do pay off in the end. If you can do one pass or even two instead of 3 or 4 passes you just saved a whole lot of money.

I still say making doors use a 3HP and up router with the best bits you can afford, that makes it a fun job instead of arduous.


01-31-2011 08:17 PM
dovetail_65 Yeah I never use multiple passes for door parts on anything except maybe the deeper raised panel profiles. Really for those those I just use the shaper.

If your router is sized properly for the bits and the bits are quality you should not need multiple pases or even have to sand much if at all.

This is one area cheaper bits show their weakness. I use the cheap bits a lot, but for door parts use the best money can buy. There is substantial difference in quality of cut and the speed and depth at which you can make those cuts between when using quality bits. Pretty much for those type bits, door rail and stile and panel raisers you get what you pay for.

I would rather have better bits and a lower quality router than bad bits and a great router. I have found that the better more expensive bits for door making really do pay off in the end. If you can do one pass or even two instead of 3 or 4 passes you just saved a whole lot of money.

I still say making doors use a 3HP and up router with the best bits you can afford, that makes it a fun job instead of arduous.
01-31-2011 05:29 PM
JohnWP And now I have a bunch of them! Thanks all, I am definitely at the shallow end of the pool at the moment.

John
01-31-2011 12:32 PM
BigJimAK Opinions are like... noses... Everybody has one!!
01-31-2011 10:24 AM
walowan Multiple passes for door parts? What a waste of time, burn marks can be easily sanded out and you should sand to remove the router marks anyway. And if if you get a tear out just make another part...much faster than multiple passes....
01-26-2011 10:22 PM
cgreene Do a search for "router bit speed guild" and you will find a chart that gives suggested speeds for the bit size.

I have the same router in my table and it has no problem making the cuts on rail & stiles in one pass. However, I usually make the cut about 1/16 to 1/32 short of full depth, then make a final pass for the last bit to clean up any burns or tear out.
01-26-2011 09:15 PM
bobj3 Hi Nick

True, But it's best to know the best way 1st.. I think
Walk b/4 you run..
Many like to use Oak for the door frames and panel and it likes to split out a lot, with the 1st. small pass it will stop most of that error..(score pass)

But here's a little trick that will drop the time by 4, start with 5" wide stock, do the ends 1st.then do all the long sides and than RIP the stock to size, you will end up with all the parts to the door in a snap.. but don't forget the magic number of 4 to get the length of the rails..

=======

Quote:
Originally Posted by dovetail_65 View Post
Yikes, if you did an entire kitchen like that you are adding a heck of a lot of time. I guess a few doors like that is fine. And if it is your first time that sound like a good way to start.

I am a one pass kind of guy. If you have the right bits and right router(or shaper even) one pass is sufficient.


01-26-2011 09:10 PM
jlord I also route my door parts in one pass. 2 passes with the raised panel bit changing the bearing between first & second pass. Not to much of a problem with quality bits & a 3-1/4 hp router. I can see with a lesser power router making more than one pass. A shaper with a feeder is the best way to go, but you can do a lot with a good router.
01-26-2011 06:36 PM
dovetail_65 Yikes, if you did an entire kitchen like that you are adding a heck of a lot of time. I guess a few doors like that is fine. And if it is your first time that sound like a good way to start.

I am a one pass kind of guy. If you have the right bits and right router(or shaper even) one pass is sufficient.
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