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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-21-2012 06:01 PM
black3000gt
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
Hi Mark -you mentioned that you will be working with plexiglass but you didn't say if you have experience with it in the past. Especially watch RPMs and heat buildup. Also chip out can be a problem (unless the edges will be covered w/ moulding or something). There are web tutorials that will be beneficial to read.
I don't have experience routing plexiglass, but i have worked with it in the past. I have made a few boxes, using a scripe to cut it. If you could point me in the direction of the web tutorials, that would be great. I have heard two different opinions on speed, either very slow, or very fast. I also want to make sure i have the right bits. I am assuming that carbide bits are the way to go?

To give an idea, i need to make a very basic "joint", like a tounge and grove joint. This will be a removeable panel that fits into the joint on one side and held together with magnets on the other side. The issue is the plexiglass is .188" thick. I was thinking i could do it with a table saw by setting my depth, but on the "grove" side i need to retain the thickness to "lock in" the panel. I wish i could describe this better
03-21-2012 04:24 PM
Drew Eckhardt
Quote:
Originally Posted by black3000gt View Post
I feel i have 2 options.

1) Make my own router table, get a better router.
2) Buy Ryobi's advanced routing table and get a better router.

Option 1 would be a good deal cheaper, build a table should only take a few hours. The other issue is i have VERY limited space so I am trying to stay away from permanent fixtures. Thanks again for all the help!
I bought a top/plate/fence package (Rockler 32 x 24") and put folding legs on it. Works great outside making sawdust and stored inside my 6x14' shed where it doesn't take up much space. I suggest you make or buy a top and do the same.
03-21-2012 02:33 PM
Steve B. Hi Mark -you mentioned that you will be working with plexiglass but you didn't say if you have experience with it in the past. Especially watch RPMs and heat buildup. Also chip out can be a problem (unless the edges will be covered w/ moulding or something). There are web tutorials that will be beneficial to read.
03-21-2012 12:51 PM
bobj3 Hi Mark

Your 1 1/2HP router will do the job having a bigger router is nice but not a must have item, the Vert. router bits will do just fine and yes you can use them on a standard router table..(see myloads for a quick fixture you can use on your router table) the real plus they are cheaper and a lot safer to use and take less power to spin..most just make cabinet doors now and than ,real no need to put out a ton of money for the bits..


MLCS Raised Panel Carbide Tipped Router Bits 2

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03-21-2012 12:04 PM
bcfunburst
What to Buy

Quote:
Originally Posted by black3000gt View Post
Hi everyone.
I am new to using a router. I picked up my first router table from home depot, but i am considering not opening and returing for a better router. I picked up a ryobi routing table that comes with a 1.5hp router. I have had good results with previous ryobi products, but this one seems to get very bad reviews. Please let me know what you all think.
I am going to be using this mainly for routing plexiglass, and in the future i would like to make new raised panel cabinet doors to reface my kitchen. Any ideas, opinions or suggestions would be great. Thanks!
Agreed! Buy the best NOW. No regrets later. For raised panels you will need at least 2 1/4 hp router with 1/2 inch chuck capacity. Craftsman has a good router of that size for very reasonable price, USA. Build your own table with a good quality router plate. (many available) If you are like most of us, you have lots of older scrap wood in stock for building a table, especially if it's not to be permanent. And good luck with whatever you decide. Let us know how it goes, please.
03-21-2012 11:26 AM
black3000gt I have not yet opened the router table. It is sitting down in it's box still sealed. Money isn't that big an issue, i just want to make sure i am not getting more than i need. My main use for the router will be cutting thin plexiglass, 1/4" to 1/8".

I feel for the type of work i will be doing, a router table is the way to go. I guess i could make my own as i just finshed my workbench, well almost. Just waiting for the glue to dry on the hardboard.

I feel i have 2 options.

1) Make my own router table, get a better router.
2) Buy Ryobi's advanced routing table and get a better router.

Option 1 would be a good deal cheaper, build a table should only take a few hours. The other issue is i have VERY limited space so I am trying to stay away from permanent fixtures. Thanks again for all the help!
03-21-2012 10:20 AM
Big Steve Yeah, two thoughts:
  • For raised panels you will want more powerful router. Many will suggest >3 HP, but at least >2HP
  • Good suggestion to buy the best tool you can afford. Buyers remorse sets in quickly (as you saw last night!)
03-21-2012 09:59 AM
Desertcarver Hello and Welcome
I concur 1 1/2 HP will be to small for what raised panel doors.
03-21-2012 08:55 AM
N'awlins77 I'm sure you will hear from more true "experts", then I, but from what I've gathered from info here, you will want a more powerful router then 1.5 horses, for when you get into building your raised panel doors. Those bits cut a large surface area.
03-21-2012 08:04 AM
Woodshaper67 When you are looking at tools your budgets rules what you can buy.The problem with the big box stores is the some of the tools they sell are not the best quality.My opinion is buy what will last.
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