Router Forums - Reply to Topic
Thread: Table Saw Sliding Table Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-18-2012 11:22 PM
CanuckGal Ok the review is posted!
06-18-2012 11:14 AM
MAFoElffen
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogalee View Post
My vote would be a track saw for about the same price.
I have a Dewalt tracksaw. It tilts up to 47 and a plunge capacity of over 2". You can also make angle cuts. I have both the 59" and 102 " tracks.
I am not sure I could wrestle a 4' X 8' sheet of ply wood on the sliding sled on a table saw without damaging something.
Bottom line is IMHO you would more versatilty with a track saw be a Festool, Dewalt or Mikita.

I read this thread last night and wanted to comment, but the last post was a while ago when she decided, bought a slider and was going to write a review. But since there was another post... My perspective.

Elsewhere here is my Jobsite Router Table "plus..."...

That rip/crosscut table itself makes 4x8 sheets fairly manageable and easy for me. But being I have disabilities, to make it easier or when I'm having a bad day, I have a lattice built for a 4x6 cutting table top that I clamp on top of that table. On that, I use tracksaw "type" jigs with "my" circular saw. Very accurate.

Someone made a comment about available selection of 7 1/4 blades... and not being able to get that many teeth into it.(?) I have 7 1/4 inch blades ranging from 24 teeth to 104 teeth... Normal to thin kerf.

On bad days, I have a leg connected/hinged off the side of the table, with a block at the end, with a handle attached to that. I put the sheet onto that block and swing the handle up. It gets the sheet onto the table. Then I slide it into position.

When everything is done, everything gets packed up and hangs on a wall. I work on my own in spite of challenges. It's easy, accurate, portable and doesn't take up much room when not in use.

I guess there's hundreds of ways to get somewhere and be at the same destination. Personally, I have to look at how I get there and if it's right for me.
06-18-2012 04:36 AM
Phil P Hi Deb

Where I'm based it is a requirement for trade shops to install a run-off table behind saw which is capable of supporting the size of material you are cutting - the run-off table prevents a lot of accidents and makes length ripping long stock much less fraught (so you don't scare the cr*p out of yourself). What that means is a lot of trade workshops have big run-off tables, normally 1.5 to 2 metres, but a rear run-off table still doesn't support the sheet when making a really narrow cut off the edge of a board. In reality to break-down sheet goods fully on a table saw you need a space of at least like 5.5 metres (18 ft) square to handle all the rip and crosscuts possible on an 8 x 4ft sheet (and still get yourself into the shop, as well). The ideal machine for the task is a large slider, such as an Altendorf, but for most small outfits (and home woodworkers, too) that's simply two much (money and space), so a hand circular saw, guide rail, pair of trestles and a couple of 4 x2s is a great way to do the initial breaking down of the sheet material into more manageable pieces leaving the table saw to do the final dimensioning. For crosscutting, in space terms, a radial arm saw or sliding compound mitre saw works far better than a sliding carraige because the workbench space either side of the saw can be used for other purposes when the saw is not in use. The sliding carraige you ordered will help you work more accurately and quickly, but I feel it simply isn't big enough to handle a lot of cuts on an 8 x 4ft sheet and it doesn't have enough support, especially for thinner sheet materials

Good luck with your purchase

PS Sorry if this sounds negative. It isn't meant to. Many years back I bought a 12in table saw with a small sliding carraige on the side (larger than the one you are buying, came with a scoring blade too and was the only brand new table saw I've ever bought) to do the same sorts of task - and because space was tight in my premises back then. The purchase turned out to be very frustrating because the saw wouldn't quite manage a 1220mm (4ft) crosscut and needed to be bolted to the floor to stop it from tipping over when handling 8 x 4ft sheets! (no run-off table either, so scary as hell on dsome cuts) I eventually bought a right hand table/rip fence extension for it and built a fold down run-off table to handle long length rips, but for many of the longer crosscuts I had to employ a portable circular saw and a batten. The end solution was to move to a bigger shop and buy a bigger saw.......... These days on installations (which is where I mainly work) I carry a Festool plunge saw and rails to achieve much the same as I did with that table with shorter crosscuts done on an SCMS, but that's mainly for sheet stock

Regards

Phil
06-17-2012 07:41 AM
CanuckGal Well I pulled the trigger and bought the sliding table! I will try to do a formal review on it later today but I used it for the first time yesterday and I have to say it is a great investment. I can see a few tools in my shop that will be a little less used now. For anyone who doesn't have room for a cabinet saw with a sliding table this is absolutely the way to go.
05-25-2012 10:28 AM
DaninVan Deb; you did notice that the Grizzly model has a fair warning...
"NOTICE: Installation usually requires permanent modification to your table saw or its parts. This modification may include cutting, grinding, drilling, and tapping threads in metal surfaces. Please read the Owner's Manual available online or contact Technical Support for additional details."
Your choice is probably similar(?).
The other thing that struck me is that the focus of the device(s) is/are accuracy, not safety or supporting a full 8' panel while you're trying to muscle it through the saw.
Sorry, it's a 'fail' for this guy.
05-24-2012 09:04 PM
boogalee
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckGal View Post
I currently break down sheet goods outside with a circular saw and a long extruded aluminum guide. It works well enough when I get all the math figured out. So I rough cut everything about 1/4" oversize and then clean it up on the TS. It's doing all this double cutting I am trying to avoid. I don't know that I would wrestle a full 3/4" sheet onto the table saw slide or no slide. But I have been making lots of cabinets lately and some pieces are 72" long and 30" wide. Try as I may I cannot get those measurements exact with a skillsaw. Also I haven't found a skillsaw blade yet that doesn't leave ugly tearout I can only clean up on the TS. I have tried zero clearance bottoms and masking tape with the skillsaw but I don't get the same finished edge I can get on the table saw with a good Freud blade. I don't know that an expensive tracksaw would address that issue either. But yes this is an expensive accessory and I hoped it would make things easier for me. I ain't no spring chicken anymore...LOL. I also dislike making modifications to a tool that I can't undo, which would be the case if I put this on my TS. I was hoping for that magic "Oh yes buy it! It's the the best thing since sliced bread" rapport but I guess I'll mull it over for a couple more days.
With a track saw there is no math involved. Measure 30" from the edge, line up the track and cut. Then do the same for 70".

I get no tearout. The track has a rubber edge that is designed not to leave tearout.

As far as tools go it is one of the best investments that I have made. I would not be without it. I like sliced bread so I'd have to call it a close race. LOL

If you can find a store or someone that has one I urge to try it out. You can go to youtube and search on Dewalt track saw. Watch the video and form your own opinion. I think you will be impressed.

Also if you have any questions on the Dewalt track saw give me a PM.

Good luck
Al
05-24-2012 08:45 PM
Chris Curl Deb, it seems to me that a good track saw is essentially the same as a portable RAS. I bet you can get an extremely clean and straight cut with a good one that has no play. It might take some practice to learn how to use it effectively, but once you got the hang of it, I bet you would be happy with it.
05-24-2012 07:57 PM
wbh1963 72x30 is a whole lot of sheet for one piece, especially when it is the thick stuff.

I think the problem with 7.25" blades is they have a lot less circumference in which to pack teeth, resulting in a rougher cut. Abrasive blades will make a super smooth cut, typically leaving some scorch marks behind as they do and loading up with wood particles to the point they need to be cleaned often. I have had better luck using ones designed for concrete on wood than those designed for steel or aluminum. Still not a great plan for 'long cuts'.

Much like you, I am still stuck in the land of rough cutting it on the long side just to be able to get it into the garage when I get home. Most of the time, I have that done on the panel saw at the 'big box'. Of course their blades leave a rougher edge than any of mine, but sure makes the loading and unloading easier..
05-24-2012 07:26 PM
CanuckGal Thanks for the input and some great ideas. I am completely out of shop space, I can barely get around in there now. There is definetely no room for a RAS. I have looked at many panel saw plans in the past but there is just no room even for the innovative one that swings out of the way. I currently break down sheet goods outside with a circular saw and a long extruded aluminum guide. It works well enough when I get all the math figured out. So I rough cut everything about 1/4" oversize and then clean it up on the TS. It's doing all this double cutting I am trying to avoid. I don't know that I would wrestle a full 3/4" sheet onto the table saw slide or no slide. But I have been making lots of cabinets lately and some pieces are 72" long and 30" wide. Try as I may I cannot get those measurements exact with a skillsaw. Also I haven't found a skillsaw blade yet that doesn't leave ugly tearout I can only clean up on the TS. I have tried zero clearance bottoms and masking tape with the skillsaw but I don't get the same finished edge I can get on the table saw with a good Freud blade. I don't know that an expensive tracksaw would address that issue either. But yes this is an expensive accessory and I hoped it would make things easier for me. I ain't no spring chicken anymore...LOL. I also dislike making modifications to a tool that I can't undo, which would be the case if I put this on my TS. I was hoping for that magic "Oh yes buy it! It's the the best thing since sliced bread" rapport but I guess I'll mull it over for a couple more days.
05-24-2012 05:52 PM
wbh1963 Thanks for sharing that Al. That is one sweet looking saw!

Quote:
Originally Posted by boogalee View Post
My vote would be a track saw for about the same price.
I have a Dewalt tracksaw. It tilts up to 47 and a plunge capacity of over 2". You can also make angle cuts. I have both the 59" and 102 " tracks.
I am not sure I could wrestle a 4' X 8' sheet of ply wood on the sliding sled on a table saw without damaging something.
Bottom line is IMHO you would more versatilty with a track saw be a Festool, Dewalt or Mikita.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome