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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-23-2013 09:27 PM
harrysin We're getting there Bob but what are your reasons for preferring that particular router?
09-23-2013 08:36 PM
bobj3 Hi Harry

I think you know that ,I push it all the time on the forum (2.5hp sears) but I know you are set in your ways and will never try it but now you can now,how can you select the best without trying it...

Craftsman 2.5-hp Fixed/Plunge Router : Power Up With Deals at Sears
====



09-23-2013 09:31 AM
harrysin I wonder why my good friend Bob hasn't told me which router he considers to be a "real" one and his reasons.
09-22-2013 09:24 PM
AxlMyk
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dmeadows View Post
Hmm, Harry. Typical electronic tech! Take the cover off first to see what's inside!
LOL. That was my first thought.
09-22-2013 09:19 AM
harrysin
Quote:
Originally Posted by harrysin View Post
well bob, which router and why, do you call a real router, seriously, i'm interested to see if our respective experiences with routers have led to different requirements.
bump
09-22-2013 09:16 AM
harrysin
Quote:
Originally Posted by david_de View Post
I purchased a fax machine, while on vacation in Hong Kong, to use where I was living and working in Taipei, Taiwan. Hong Kong was 220 and Taipei was 110 so I picked up a converter at the same time. As I recall (it was about 20 years ago) it was rather inexpensive and weighed I would guess about 5 pounds. When I finished the job I brought both fax machine and converter to US and used it for years. Finally hauled it to the dump when the fax machine died.

I suppose the load of the fax machine is much less hence the smaller size? Maybe it does not take much to go from 110 to 220 and more to go the other way? Just curious.
A double wound transformer has two insulated windings, a primary and a secondary. One that reduces 220 volts to 110 Volts means that the primary has twice the number of turns of insulated Copper wire as the secondary. In many cases the transformer can be used the other way round, ie: 110 volts in and 220 volts out, but this depends on the insulation used.
On the other hand an auto transformer has just one winding that is tapped at the centre point, meaning that the 220 volts is applied across the outer ends of the winding and the 110 volts is from one end to the centre tap. with this type the output is at mains potential whereas in a double wound transformer the secondary is isolated from the mains but because there are two lots of windings it is heavier than an auto transformer.
09-22-2013 08:52 AM
neville9999 So Harry, did the delivery guy stick his hand out for any over weight money? N
09-21-2013 11:26 AM
david_de I purchased a fax machine, while on vacation in Hong Kong, to use where I was living and working in Taipei, Taiwan. Hong Kong was 220 and Taipei was 110 so I picked up a converter at the same time. As I recall (it was about 20 years ago) it was rather inexpensive and weighed I would guess about 5 pounds. When I finished the job I brought both fax machine and converter to US and used it for years. Finally hauled it to the dump when the fax machine died.

I suppose the load of the fax machine is much less hence the smaller size? Maybe it does not take much to go from 110 to 220 and more to go the other way? Just curious.
09-21-2013 09:24 AM
WurliTzerwilly I was talking about a VFD, Harry. They don't suffer capacitor issues as long as they get used and even after a year of idling, the larger ones have caused no issues for me.
A well made VFD will 'cycle' itself to ensure that components don't get 'tired'.

That said, I have 15V 100A switch mode supplies that work just fine. A lot depends where they're made and what you pay for them.
09-21-2013 08:34 AM
harrysin Switch mode power supplies aren't as reliable as an iron cored transformer Alan, big ones usually run quite hot and dry out the electrolytic capacitors.
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