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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-14-2014 11:39 PM
GulfcoastGuy
Quote:
Originally Posted by harrysin View Post
"To me this brings up a technical question and I know before I bring it up that I'm going to get some blow back but will ask it anyway. The question is, how much tolerance can there be in the set up so that the joint is still alright. The term alright is one thing, perfect is another."
Too many newcomers to woodworking talk about thousandths of an inch. Forget it! Wood moves with the weather and you would be surprised at just how much it can move. My philosophy is that "if it looks right it is right".
As for Jerry's specific question, if the joint comes to a sharp point it IS correct, if not, forget measuring instruments and make a minute adjustment to either the fence or bit height depending on the error.
Anyone that's ever run their finger across a human hair stretched out on a smooth surface knows that the sense of touch can detect variances of 0.001's of an inch. Best setup check available is your fingers.
05-14-2014 11:34 PM
GulfcoastGuy I'm reluctant to jump in here because I don't have any experience with the bit but I have done some research. The most intriguing thing I've found is this:

Setting Up a Locking Miter Bit

Looks like it should work regardless of the thickness of the stock.
05-14-2014 10:55 PM
harrysin "To me this brings up a technical question and I know before I bring it up that I'm going to get some blow back but will ask it anyway. The question is, how much tolerance can there be in the set up so that the joint is still alright. The term alright is one thing, perfect is another."
Too many newcomers to woodworking talk about thousandths of an inch. Forget it! Wood moves with the weather and you would be surprised at just how much it can move. My philosophy is that "if it looks right it is right".
As for Jerry's specific question, if the joint comes to a sharp point it IS correct, if not, forget measuring instruments and make a minute adjustment to either the fence or bit height depending on the error.
05-14-2014 02:15 PM
Jerry Bowen
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willway View Post
Hi Martyn, You can save yourself a lot of frustration by purchasing the setup blocks. Almost every bit manufacturer sells the blocks for their bit. They are almost universally around $10. Amazon has the Infinity setup blocks for $9.90 a set.

Amazon.com: infinity detup blocks: Tools & Home Improvement

Dick

The key word here that Dick uses is "almost". The set up blocks that I have read about and think that I understand are for standard thicknesses of material. I you need to cut the profile into odd thicknesses of material is where the Infinity set up jig comes into being of value.

The set up blocks will certainly work for you if your are willing to plane your matrial to a thickness that matches the blocks.

To me this brings up a technical question and I know before I bring it up that I'm going to get some blow back but will ask it anyway. The question is, how much tolerance can there be in the set up so that the joint is still alright. The term alright is one thing, perfect is another.

What I have found in my limited experience with these bits is that a good cut leaves a very sharp knife edge with no chips in it and the original width of the workpiece has not been altered due to the cut. Once you get such a cut with the face laying on the router table, the set ups is correct for the second cut with the face against the fence into the the other workpiece will be as it should be. If you are off a little bit the joint may be alright but without that sharp edge it won't be perfect. Guess it depends on what one's standards are huh?

I am talking in terms of what I think is ideal and what I have observed, it is not necessariy the results that I have always gotten. Again, my expectations are often greater that my level of skill. I suppose that once these two areas always match it will be time to move on to a new interest and in my case anyway, that is going to be a very long time.

Jerry

Jerry
05-14-2014 09:14 AM
Willway Hi Martyn, You can save yourself a lot of frustration by purchasing the setup blocks. Almost every bit manufacturer sells the blocks for their bit. They are almost universally around $10. Amazon has the Infinity setup blocks for $9.90 a set.

Amazon.com: infinity detup blocks: Tools & Home Improvement

Dick
05-14-2014 07:43 AM
hprodcrx Thanks for the responses. I do agree that a quality bit is important contributor to a good joint. The setup is the other major part, from what I have read from bit manufacturers the setup does not seem too difficult to do. I am leaning towards purchasing the Infinity bit and learning to set it up and make my own guide block. If my guide block efforts don't work I can always buy one.
Thanks again for the input.

Martyn
05-13-2014 06:55 PM
Jerry Bowen
Quote:
Originally Posted by paduke View Post
Its better to buy expensive not cheap because you will know the results are you not the bit. Also a high dollar investment will push you thru the frustration of learning to use it

I sure do agree with Bill on buying a quality bit. I would also encourage you to take a serious look at the Infinity jig for the set up of the lock miter bit. I have only read of the frustration of sitting one of these bits up, I have never experienced said frustration because I started with the set up jig and everything worked for right from the get go. I know that the jig is a little spendy for what you get but it is well worth the cost.

Please let us know know what you finally decide to do and if we can help in any way we will sure try.

Jerry
05-13-2014 05:16 PM
paduke Its better to buy expensive not cheap because you will know the results are you not the bit. Also a high dollar investment will push you thru the frustration of learning to use it
05-13-2014 05:13 PM
paduke I use the whiteside lock miter bits. The size range of bits is critical if you are doing more than standard stock 3/4 boards
05-13-2014 12:29 PM
bcfunburst
Lock Miter Bit

Hi Martyn.
I have used a 1/2" X 45* lock miter bit to do a Cpl of boxes now. I start out with a cheap bit so I can gain some experience B 4 I get serious about buying more expensive hardware. I think the key to your success will be setting up the bit-to-wood alignment. You need to take the time and use some scrap wood to get the joint just perfect; THEN make yourself a pair of set-up blocks for future quick set-up. I am a novice to this lock miter bit, but I think there are several sizes you might consider. I have used only 1/2" and 3/4". After lots of practise, I get really tight clean joints now. I might add; I have only used these on hardwood.
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