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Thread: The threshold of my remodel project Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-24-2015 08:25 AM
collinb My concern, after all, was not whether I could do it, but how. These considerations are extremely helpful. Tx.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghidrah View Post
Collin I can't tell how wide the board is. If you're adamant on maintaining a flat rise at the center of the interface.

1. I would ensure the gap between the 2 floors is parallel, no + or - allowed.
2. Cut of a 6" section as a template, ensure the bottom is flat, then set it in the gap to mark the tops of the 2 floors, verify through the entire length of the gap.
3. If you're adamant on the rise rough cut it for the desired flat at the center of the template with BS or TS, leave some meat to finish sand when your satisfied.
4. Test it again as a gauge through the entire length of the gap. It won't be too late change your mind on the rise part and or whether or not you want to add a lip over the 2 floors to hide any expansion or contraction between the 2.

A 10'6 length of the wood shown will be a challenge to flat and straighten. If you have a 6 or 8" jointer and the width falls within the jointers maximum that would solve the flat, if the wood is wider you could rip it 1st then joint the bottom and glue them back together.

To straighten the board you could rip 2 8' sections of ply as a straight edge and screw them to the flattened bottom then run it through the TS. I would also suggest to dado the bottom to minimize curling in the future.
01-22-2015 03:56 PM
Ghidrah Collin I can't tell how wide the board is. If you're adamant on maintaining a flat rise at the center of the interface.

1. I would ensure the gap between the 2 floors is parallel, no + or - allowed.
2. Cut of a 6" section as a template, ensure the bottom is flat, then set it in the gap to mark the tops of the 2 floors, verify through the entire length of the gap.
3. If you're adamant on the rise rough cut it for the desired flat at the center of the template with BS or TS, leave some meat to finish sand when your satisfied.
4. Test it again as a gauge through the entire length of the gap. It won't be too late change your mind on the rise part and or whether or not you want to add a lip over the 2 floors to hide any expansion or contraction between the 2.

A 10'6 length of the wood shown will be a challenge to flat and straighten. If you have a 6 or 8" jointer and the width falls within the jointers maximum that would solve the flat, if the wood is wider you could rip it 1st then joint the bottom and glue them back together.

To straighten the board you could rip 2 8' sections of ply as a straight edge and screw them to the flattened bottom then run it through the TS. I would also suggest to dado the bottom to minimize curling in the future.
01-22-2015 12:28 PM
DesertRatTom Had a similar problem but only about 1/8th difference in height to allow for tiles on one side of the doorway. Used a table saw with oak held vertically to cut away that depth exactly to fit over the tiles. Worked fine. Hand fitted the threshold so it stays in place without glue, since the honeydo list includes replacing that tile floor in the great someday.
01-22-2015 11:57 AM
paduke
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomp913 View Post
I seem to recall it's from the reeds known as threshes used to cover the floor (maybe dirt) and the raised portion at the doorway was to "hold" them in the room.
Yep german or english peasants used the thresh(think straw) after the harvest to cover the dirt floor (and roof) Thresh are the reeds or stems left after beating them against the ground to extract the seeds. This was done on a threshing floor. Threshold was a board nailed across the door opening to hold the thresh inside.
01-22-2015 11:49 AM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaffboat View Post
My laptop dictionary says:

ORIGIN Old English therscold, threscold; related to German dialect Drischaufel; the first element is related to thresh (in a Germanic sense ‘tread’ ), but the origin of the second element is unknown.

Stick will probably find a better answer.
[Middle English thresshold, from Old English therscold, threscold; see terə-1 in Indo-European roots.]

1. the sill of a doorway.
2. the entrance to a house or building.
3. any point of entering or beginning: the threshold of a new career.
4. Also called limen. the point at which a stimulus is of sufficient intensity to begin to produce an effect: the threshold of consciousness; a low threshold of pain.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English threscold, threscwald, c. Old Norse threskǫldr; akin to thresh in old sense “trample, tread”; -old, -wald unexplained]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threshold_%28door%29
01-22-2015 11:43 AM
tomp913
Quote:
Originally Posted by paduke View Post
BTW anyone know where the word Threshold comes from
I seem to recall it's from the reeds known as threshes used to cover the floor (maybe dirt) and the raised portion at the doorway was to "hold" them in the room.
01-22-2015 11:12 AM
MT Stringer It appears you cold use a table saw to make three cuts with the bottom of the trim piece vertical against the fence.
01-22-2015 10:59 AM
collinb
Attached board pic

Though this is a used casing you can see by the lines what I mean by trimming it to become a threshold. Some bottom center support would make it suitably strong.

Flooring is level and relatively parallel.

Perhaps a saw making the cuts as marked in black, then sanding, might be better than the router method I had in mind.

I like the manufactured one shown. If I trimmed out from end to end that *might* be a possibility. Would be really good if I went with a wider threshold, then the wall at one end could be accommodated.
01-22-2015 10:59 AM
Gaffboat
Quote:
Originally Posted by paduke View Post
BTW anyone know where the word Threshold comes from
My laptop dictionary says:

ORIGIN Old English therscold, threscold; related to German dialect Drischaufel; the first element is related to thresh (in a Germanic sense ‘tread’ ), but the origin of the second element is unknown.

Stick will probably find a better answer.
01-22-2015 10:24 AM
paduke BTW anyone know where the word Threshold comes from
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