Cutting curves - Router Forums
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post #1 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 11:16 AM Thread Starter
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Smile Cutting curves

Hello,

I am planning to build two subwoofer "cabinets" for my electrostatic panels. I visited a CNC shop but they specialize in volume so I decided to do it myself.

I tried cutting the curved panels with a jig saw set at 0 [disabled rotation mode] but it turns a little bit no matter how tight I hold the handle. The chaps at the CNC shop recommended that I use a portable router. I had a top of the line Craftsman router but sold it many years ago so I just purchased a new Makita RT0701CX3 1-1/4 HP Compact Router Kit that comes with a straight guide.

My question is, how do it follow the curves with my new router? I have to make four pieces that have to be identical. Please see drawing. I have also attached photos of a friend's unfinished cabinets without the grille, they were built in a shop in the UK.

Best regards,

Horacio
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post #2 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 12:03 PM
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I would cut a pattern out of 1/2" mdf or plywood to use with a pattern bit in the router. You could use your jig saw to cut the pattern by cutting about 1/8" outside the line of your drawing and then sanding to the line to make sure you have a smooth edge. Cut your final pieces the same way (leaving the 1/8" excess) and then use the pattern you made to rout them to final size. The bearing on the pattern bit follows the curve of your pattern to give you a smooth, accurate final shape.

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post #3 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 12:19 PM
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Hello!

A jig saw can do that, especially if you test various blades to find the right one .
(Or the right Jig saw, not all are the same)
But finish is not so good.If it is not visible, I'd go for that quick way .

The portable router can do it better, except corners.

I would use the cutter I' v got in a standard set of cutters:
Straight bit with a bearing at end of cutter, diameter not critical like 1/2 " is good.

First thing is to make a jig out of some 1/2 or more MDF, that would be exactly the
aperture you want to make.Use a Jig-saw, a file, some putty if necessary.
This shape will be copied by the bearing.( Copied with any errors)


The jig saw be used to clear the way, cut the inside of your fabrication, leaving around 1/8 " or less to be cut.
Apply jig exactly on the lines to be cut.

Secure well.

Set depth so that bearing will contact jig, and that cutter would cut your part.
cut from your part side at set depth , going against the cut that is clockwise inside the hole.

There still will be some work in the corners, that will have radius 1/2 dia of the cutter like 1/4 " for a 1/2" cutter.

IMHO:
Thats a way to do it, there are other, like cutting directly through your material, using a router compass attachment
a standard straight bit and some geometry,
but I would not, it seems difficult and with risks of mistakes.0
Or if material is cheap, maybe Yes.

Regards
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post #4 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 01:05 PM
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Just in case you didn't understand what the other guys said. Same thing, just a video. Spotted this the other day, similar to how I do it, except I keep my templates/patterns/masters for use again later, mine are two layers of 1/2" plywood, also I hold the work in place with nails instead of double-sided tape.
Easy peasy.

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post #5 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaffboat View Post
I would cut a pattern out of 1/2" mdf or plywood to use with a pattern bit in the router. You could use your jig saw to cut the pattern by cutting about 1/8" outside the line of your drawing and then sanding to the line to make sure you have a smooth edge. Cut your final pieces the same way (leaving the 1/8" excess) and then use the pattern you made to rout them to final size. The bearing on the pattern bit follows the curve of your pattern to give you a smooth, accurate final shape.
+1 What Oliver said.
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post #6 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
Just in case you didn't understand what the other guys said. Same thing, just a video. Spotted this the other day, similar to how I do it, except I keep my templates/patterns/masters for use again later, mine are two layers of 1/2" plywood, also I hold the work in place with nails instead of double-sided tape.
Easy peasy.
Good video, Theo. That explains it better than my description and should be helpful for Horacio.

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post #7 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-30-2018, 03:19 PM
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Welcome to the forum, Horacio! All good advice by these guys who use routers a lot. Where in the US are you located? You might be close to one of us with a CNC.

Curious about your screen name - are you a Ferrari fan, or even better, an owner?

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post #8 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-31-2018, 10:13 AM
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Horacio check around at the local woodworking stores and see if they can direct you to a hobbyist CNC owner that could cut templates for you or woodworking club that you could contact and see if members have CNC machines. Most will be willing to do it at a reasonable cost then you can use them over and over. if you mess one up the guy would have the file to cut another one quickly.

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post #9 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-31-2018, 11:19 AM Thread Starter
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Hello,

Thanks much for the useful tips. A few months ago, I did build a pair of stands for the same loudspeakers that now I am going to use with additional subwoofers. I used a jig saw but I had to sand a lot and both panels are not identical, please see photos. We live in Pinecrest (Miami). David, you are right about the screen name, I had a 456.

Any recommendations regarding a router bit with bearings, straight or spiral?

Horacio
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post #10 of 40 (permalink) Old 01-31-2018, 04:06 PM
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Anything made by Whiteside You can look at their site they make any of the bits you would need and very high quality products https://www.whitesiderouterbits.com/
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