Tenons on Long boards? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 08:36 PM Thread Starter
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Default Tenons on Long boards?

Can someone please advise the best way to make 1 1/2" tenons in length x 1/2'"in width on longer boards for a headboard. My material is 1 1/2" thick and the boards(rails) are 63" long x 7" wide. Too long for my little shop to do on the tenons on the table saw. And with the longer boards too hard to handle on a table, so I figure the best way is to make a jig to hold my material and cut a bit off each side to nibble it down to fit a 1/2" mortise. Any other ideas. Thanks
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 09:08 PM
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Have you considered a router with an edge guide, freehand, 1/2" down spiral bit...? Add a long piece of wood on the edge guide so you can route straight past the edge of the board...

Nibble away at it until you hit the desired depth...cut a line with a knife so you don't get tear out at the board end of the tenon...

Then flip it over and repeat. When done with the faces, chisel the edges to your dimension...

Start nibbling at the end of the board and work your way in so the router always has support...complete the cut to depth then move in some more til you get to your shoulder line...

I've also used a radial arm saw to nibble then dress it with a block plane and chisel...if you don't have a shoulder plane or router plane...

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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 09:16 PM
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Just like Nick suggested.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 09:42 PM
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Just like Nick suggested...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 10:22 PM Thread Starter
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I hadn't even thought about using a edge guide. Would that be with a plunge router? Plunging 1/4" and working to the end of the board. Then readjusting the fence in? The board is 7" wide. How long of a guide would you suggest? thanks
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 10:58 PM
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use the stock guide, it will be good enough..
and any router will work...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 10:59 PM
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If you clamp a short straightedge on the top of your board to let the base of the router cut square to your board. Set the bit to the correct depth and proceed to take small cuts til the base of the router makes contact with the straight edge and make the final pass. Something like the first video but he doesn't use a straight edge to make his final cut.
Then tun the board over and repeat.


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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 11:41 PM
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Try this...................
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Cut Tenon on Long Board.PDF (34.7 KB, 33 views)
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-27-2020, 06:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rolanddds View Post
I hadn't even thought about using a edge guide. Would that be with a plunge router? Plunging 1/4" and working to the end of the board. Then readjusting the fence in? The board is 7" wide. How long of a guide would you suggest? thanks
You want to start at the edge of the board to depth then move inward, again to depth, then inward, etc... This will keep the router supported until you come to the shoulder line. The longer piece of wood attached to the edge guide will allow the cut to start and end cleanly (square). The extra piece of wood should be long enough to allow the router to start and end squarely...probably long enough to allow about 6" on each end plus the base width of the router. That should be enough.

Whether you use a plunge or fixed is up to you...I would think both would be comfortable but I prefer a fixed so I don't jockey the router too much when starting and stopping.

As you can see from Tom's and Herb's responses there are various ways to use a router to do this...
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Nick

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GIVE A MAN A FISH and you feed him for a day.
TEACH HIM HOW TO FISH and you feed him for his life time.
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Last edited by Nickp; 05-27-2020 at 06:34 AM.
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 05-27-2020, 07:54 AM
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I have a Leigh FMT Pro jig, and once borrowed use of my neighbor's deck railing. I clamped the FMT backwards to the railing so the long board could hang down past the edge of the deck. I have also used the edge of my shop attic pull-down stairs for shorter work that was still too long to mount the FMT to the bench.

Without an FMT jig, I would probably do the same for positioning and clamping my long work, but would use a template and guide bushing with the router. I've also come to appreciate "Floating Tenons" when using templates, guide bushings, and a router, since you can get great results using the same template to cut both matching mortises. Making floating tenon stock is easy with a table saw and then a planer to get the desired thickness, but it can be done with just the table saw. Make pieces the desired thickness, and then cut tenons from it as needed, keeping in mind that the tenon needs to be about 1/8" shorter than 2X the tenon depth. The 1/2 round ends of the routered mortises can be left open. It isn't necessary to round the tenons to fit. Leave them with square ends long enough to fit the flat sides of the mortise. The 1/2 round end spaces will take the excess glue. It's the flat side surfaces of the mortise and tenon that provide the joint strength. They should slide together when being dry fit, with enough friction to keep them from falling apart, but should not require pounding with fist or hammer to dry fit them together. When sized this way and the glue is added, they will be very strong.

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