cleaning up end grain on hardwood - Router Forums
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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-24-2011, 09:31 PM Thread Starter
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Default cleaning up end grain on hardwood

sorry to those of you who are now reading this for the second time. I am new to the site and may have inadvertantly sent it the worng way the first time. I installed hardwod floring 3/4" thick a year or so ago and have now decided tha I want to continue it into the next room. I had a transition strip that covered the first ends that were not perfectly lined up (off by up to 1/16"). Now I want to continue but there will be gaps if I don't get them perfectly flush. I am thinking about using a template bit 3/4 dia. 11/4 " long with a 1/2" shank and taking multiple passes. Any other thoughts/suggestions would be most helpful.

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JRB
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-24-2011, 10:58 PM
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sorry to those of you who are now reading this for the second time. I am new to the site and may have inadvertantly sent it the worng way the first time. I installed hardwod floring 3/4" thick a year or so ago and have now decided tha I want to continue it into the next room. I had a transition strip that covered the first ends that were not perfectly lined up (off by up to 1/16"). Now I want to continue but there will be gaps if I don't get them perfectly flush. I am thinking about using a template bit 3/4 dia. 11/4 " long with a 1/2" shank and taking multiple passes. Any other thoughts/suggestions would be most helpful.

Thanks

JRB
Hi JRB - Welcome to the forum

Router would probably work but that is a lot of endgrain to deal with. I would be inclined to use a circular saw with a fine tooth finish blade. Lay down a guide strip for the shoe to run against and make the first cut a scoring cut (1/8" or less).

John Schaben

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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-25-2011, 09:24 AM
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I mostly agree about the circular saw with a guide rail. The practical side, however, is whether there are obstructions at either end of the saw's path. It might be easier to scribe a line with a straight edge, and cut only the "offending" boards, perhaps with a hand saw or Multi-Tool.

Depending on the layout of the original floor, you'll still have an obvious break line at the transition point. Thus, you might still want to have some sort of transition board perpendicular to the flooring strips, just to make a clean line.

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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-25-2011, 09:33 AM
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Hi

I disagree with the power hand saw they like to lift the wood up and rip up the ends.I suggest you get the saw below.
5" DoubleCut Saw

=======

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I mostly agree about the circular saw with a guide rail. The practical side, however, is whether there are obstructions at either end of the saw's path. It might be easier to scribe a line with a straight edge, and cut only the "offending" boards, perhaps with a hand saw or Multi-Tool.

Depending on the layout of the original floor, you'll still have an obvious break line at the transition point. Thus, you might still want to have some sort of transition board perpendicular to the flooring strips, just to make a clean line.



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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-25-2011, 10:36 AM
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I think you should pull up some boards to eliminate the break line. Extra work and cost but the break will look pretty bad. Also, no matter how you do it, it's going to be very difficult to get a clean edge cutting installed HW flooring. A router might work if you use some double sided tape to hold a straight edge and make cuts that eliminate the break line. Clean up corners with a small chisel, etc.

Just sayin'

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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 12:23 AM
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Quote:
I disagree with the power hand saw they like to lift the wood up and rip up the ends.I suggest you get the saw below.
5" DoubleCut Saw
Interesting. Do you actually use one? There is a heated debate on another forum about it. The one guy who actually uses one likes it. The rest have many opinions based on conjecture.

Have you used it on anything else but wood?
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 04:24 AM
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You could try to cut the new boards at the angle to fit into the edge of the old boards and then finish the edge off the tongue or grove , with the router too match
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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 10:48 AM
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Hi

I disagree with the power hand saw they like to lift the wood up and rip up the ends.I suggest you get the saw below.
5" DoubleCut Saw

=======
True of most old-style circular saws. A plunge-cut saw with a zero-clearance insert at the uplift end of the blade (e.g. Festool) would be less likely to do that.

The double-cut saw you linked looks interesting.

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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 01:37 PM
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True of most old-style circular saws. A plunge-cut saw with a zero-clearance insert at the uplift end of the blade (e.g. Festool) would be less likely to do that.
A Festool (or Makita 5000SP, or Mafell MT55cc, or Hilti WSC255/WSC265, etc) on a rail will do exactly as Ralph says - near perfect straight cut with minimal edge splintering. What you get can often be disguised with a little bit of coloured wax (such as Liberon). Part of the trick is to have the correct blade in the machine. The ends of cut are finished using a hand saw running against a straight hardwood block and possibly paring with a sharp chisel as needed. It's the sort of set-up I use for breaking-out floors for electric/plumbing installs and minimises the amount of make good work required.

Don't know about using that Harbor Freight souped-ep angle grinder doo-hickey, though, doesn't look like it could be guided to cut a dead straight line. I've seen plumbers using them to cut access holes in floors but we joiners generally have to quite a bit of clean-up afterwards as the holes aren't always that straight. I do agree that with fresh blades they can cut cleanly - but nowhere near as good as a rail guided saw set-up IMHO

Regards

Phil
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 01:56 PM
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YouTube - ‪Dual Saw(tm) Counter-Rotating Power Saw - As Seen on TV‬‏

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PI0SM...1&feature=fvwp

But who wants to put out 500.oo + for Festool..
======

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Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
A Festool (or Makita 5000SP, or Mafell MT55cc, or Hilti WSC255/WSC265, etc) on a rail will do exactly as Ralph says - near perfect straight cut with minimal edge splintering. What you get can often be disguised with a little bit of coloured wax (such as Liberon). Part of the trick is to have the correct blade in the machine. The ends of cut are finished using a hand saw running against a straight hardwood block and possibly paring with a sharp chisel as needed. It's the sort of set-up I use for breaking-out floors for electric/plumbing installs and minimises the amount of make good work required.

Don't know about using that Harbor Freight souped-ep angle grinder doo-hickey, though, doesn't look like it could be guided to cut a dead straight line. I've seen plumbers using them to cut access holes in floors but we joiners generally have to quite a bit of clean-up afterwards as the holes aren't always that straight. I do agree that with fresh blades they can cut cleanly - but nowhere near as good as a rail guided saw set-up IMHO

Regards

Phil



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Last edited by bobj3; 05-26-2011 at 02:01 PM.
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