Tongue and groove tearout - Router Forums
 12Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 01:14 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: N/a
Posts: 5
 
Default Tongue and groove tearout

Hi

Help, I am stuck!

I am routing tongue and groove hardwood planks which are too long to go over a router table. Am using a handheld router with a single tongue and groove bit fitted with a bearing. I have an identical piece of wood for supporting the router so am moving/supporting it along a flat surface.

The finish of cut on the groove is fine, but when i cut the tongue it has a ragged finish on the edge where the cornerof the tongue has flaked/chipped. Its not the end of the world as it will be hidden, but it would be nice if it was a clean cut.

Anyone any thoughts as to what i am doing wrong?

Thanks
Mrs C is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 01:43 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Country: Canada
First Name: Keith
Posts: 1,151
 
Default

Does this happen with all the boards, or just some of them?

It could be the direction of the grain causing the trouble. Perhaps try running the router the other direction, as in a climb cut. It may help.

BTW, welcome to our little corner of the web.
Roy Drake and Herb Stoops like this.

OK, fess up...which one of you clowns stole my sig? It was right here a second ago.
cocobolo1 is offline  
post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 04:04 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 24,523
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs C View Post
Hi

Help, I am stuck!

I am routing tongue and groove hardwood planks which are too long to go over a router table. Am using a handheld router with a single tongue and groove bit fitted with a bearing. I have an identical piece of wood for supporting the router so am moving/supporting it along a flat surface.

The finish of cut on the groove is fine, but when i cut the tongue it has a ragged finish on the edge where the cornerof the tongue has flaked/chipped. Its not the end of the world as it will be hidden, but it would be nice if it was a clean cut.

Anyone any thoughts as to what i am doing wrong?

Thanks
welcome to the forum Hrs. C...
climb cutting may be the help you are looking for...

.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf CLIMB CUTTING.pdf (74.4 KB, 130 views)

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 05:51 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 24,523
 
Default

have you considered splining instead of T&G???
less waste that will seriously add up w/ a lot less mess...

.
Attached Images
   
Attached Files
File Type: pdf R4 SPLINES 1.pdf (100.1 KB, 130 views)
Shop guy, kevin887 and jj777746 like this.

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 06:43 AM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,569
 
Default

I now prefer using splines whenever possible. When making very fine measurements such as what you did on the bit, I find it works best to use one of those 6 inch pocket rules with a sliding clip, marked in 32nds. Need a magnifying glass to read it, but it is very accurate for things like measuring small offsets, blade height and such.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	pocket rule with clip.jpg
Views:	219
Size:	15.9 KB
ID:	213354  

jj777746 likes this.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 06:48 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Richard
Posts: 2,981
 
Default

Welcome to the forum, Mrs C. I like Stick's idea of using splines the best. Saves material and a lot easier.

"The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits". Albert Einstein
Shop guy is offline  
post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 06:59 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 24,523
 
Default

splines use up drops and what can be construed as waste...

you can still use the grove cutter to do your splines....

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”

Last edited by Stick486; 05-24-2016 at 07:43 AM.
Stick486 is online now  
post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 07:25 AM
Registered User
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Country: United States
First Name: Don
Posts: 2,603
 
Default

Splines would work great as others have said. To do the tongue and groove you might try doing the tongue in two passes. Taking lighter cuts helps problems a lot.
jj777746 likes this.

Don in Murfreesboro,Tn.

Measure once cut twice and it's still to short.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 07:48 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 14,856
 
Default

Welcome to the forum Mrs. C. If you clamped the two boards together tightly then that pressure should prevent the bit from tearing grain out as it finishes the first board. I also prefer to spline however. Much simpler and you'll save about 1/2" of wood for every board you are using. As pointed out that adds up over time. A spline joint is basically the same as a T & G joint, the exception being that there are two grooves and the tongue is free floating instead of attached to one of the boards.

In the case of flooring the tongue is strictly for alignment purposes so it is imperative that you work from the back side of the boards and not the face. The backs must all sit flat on the sub floor and a tongue at the wrong height will lift one of the two boards off the sub floor which will cause squeaking and possibly crack one day. Traditionally hardwood floors were installed and sanded in place to get the top flat. Modern mating methods may be accurate enough to eliminate the different heights problem but it's best not to take a chance.

Since it's only for alignment you could use hardboard or ply for tongues. I had some thin wooden T & G paneling once that perfectly fit one of the slotting cutters in my set so I used it for splines.
kevin887 and jj777746 like this.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-24-2016, 08:13 AM
Registered User
 
Nickp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Nick
Posts: 3,350
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs C View Post

Anyone any thoughts as to what i am doing wrong?

Thanks
Welcome, Mrs. C...

What is likely happening is the cutter, as it is exiting the cut at a high angle where the grain ends, will lift a slight amount rather than cutting it cleanly because there is no more grain support at the end of the cut. What might help is to take a light initial scoring pass so that the cutter is approaching the grain at a lower angle then "have at it"...

Red Oak is my nemesis when doing the same thing...little slivers want to break off... If they're big enough, I use them for toothpicks

Climb cutting, as has been suggested, takes care of that because the cutter is cutting down into the grain and therefore does not lift when it exits.

...nope...doing nothing wrong... but just for the heck of it, is cutter clean and sharp...? What about router speed...high enough...? Enough power in the router if you're taking it in a single pass...? Good feed speed...too fast...?

Just thinkin' of the basics...
kevin887 and jj777746 like this.

Nick

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Points to Ponder...

LEARNING - the decision you make to know and
understand more about some thing.

TIME - the thing that gets in the way of learning.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Nickp is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
3/8 tongue & groove assembly bit johannmendelsohn Router Bits - Types and Usage 10 09-08-2014 01:46 PM
Biscuits vs Tongue and Groove Joints CanuckGal DIY and Renovation 9 04-22-2010 03:07 AM
2x tongue and groove ? youngmj General Routing 4 02-04-2009 11:49 PM
Spline vs. Tongue & groove wanart General Routing 1 02-28-2006 06:22 AM
Tongue and groove bits archer_456 General Routing 4 02-18-2005 05:51 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome