Arcing Brushes - Router Forums
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-04-2016, 10:19 AM Thread Starter
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Default Arcing Brushes

I have a relatively new Porter Cable plunge router that was losing power under modest load with a lot of accompanying brush arcing. I pulled the brushes and they were badly chipped. I replaced them and ran the router under moderate load for about 1 minute and the arcing started over again. I pulled the brushes after just that single 1-minute run and the new brushes were badly chipped. Is there a "home fix" for this? Other suggestions? Thank you!
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-04-2016, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by paddler0124 View Post
I have a relatively new Porter Cable plunge router that was losing power under modest load with a lot of accompanying brush arcing. I pulled the brushes and they were badly chipped. I replaced them and ran the router under moderate load for about 1 minute and the arcing started over again. I pulled the brushes after just that single 1-minute run and the new brushes were badly chipped. Is there a "home fix" for this? Other suggestions? Thank you!
get it warrantied...
you have bigger issues...
bad bearing, out of balance/damaged armature...
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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Last edited by Stick486; 01-04-2016 at 11:52 AM.
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-04-2016, 11:21 AM
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I would also say it is a manufacturing defect. I would guess that maybe one of the commutator bars on the armature where the brushes make contact is higher than the others.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-04-2016, 11:51 AM
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It's called C.A.S.B. - Commutator Anti-spherical Speed Bump...


Commutator has some damage...yes...bring it back...you will otherwise be dealing with it till you throw it out...


If you can't take it back, you will need to get it on a metal lathe to smooth the commutator...if there's a bad pole.

If you spin the shaft by hand, with the brushes installed, do you feel some un-evenness...?

You might also check the spring and wire to make sure it allows plenty of pressure and travel for the brushes to ride on the commutator... (so they don't float)

Is the commutator clean...? All that arcing and sparking may have left some carbon residue on the commutator.

Again, if you can't take it back...check the radius of the brush as compared to the commutator...maybe it's too acute and the edges are catching the edges of the poles...? Right brushes...?

Of course, the first choice is take it back...

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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-04-2016, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paddler0124 View Post
I have a relatively new Porter Cable plunge router that was losing power under modest load with a lot of accompanying brush arcing. I pulled the brushes and they were badly chipped. I replaced them and ran the router under moderate load for about 1 minute and the arcing started over again. I pulled the brushes after just that single 1-minute run and the new brushes were badly chipped. Is there a "home fix" for this? Other suggestions? Thank you!
is this a trend???

Router Forums - View Single Post - Dewalt DW618 noised motor and almost no power

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-05-2016, 09:39 AM
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Like the others said: warranty first.

In the past on several motors (not on a router, yet) I have found that if the brushes were arcing for a while, it will damage the comm. I have successfully sanded the surface on several motors. On some I used the GF's fingernail-sanding emory boards. I wouldn't do this operation unless I thought it would turn out better than it is now, or on a warrantied item. If you do it, be careful not to hit the part where the wires attach to the comm and clean out any particles left from sanding. The emory board helps because it's flat. If you use only your finger with sandpaper you might put a curve in the surface. A small fine file might actually be better. Basically hold the the abrasive where the brushes would run and turn the shaft.
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-05-2016, 11:47 AM
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Do the warrantee thing first and ask for a replacement. Send the brushes along with the unit. If they won't cover it, then try the suggested repairs. If you wait, you might easily run out the guarantee period and then its all your problem. My thought are that if you don't get a replacement, I predict the thing will find its way to the trash bin. Then you can get a Bosch.
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