Bending boards made , but a horizontal router would have helped - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
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@RainMan 2.0
Rick, what you have done looks pretty good to me. What are you concerned about, safety? I reckon if you are able to attach a higher false fence to your reversible fence, and make an L-shaped fence to trap the workpiece on the other side, it will be as good as you can get, with your current setup. If you were using featherboards, you would need double-height ones to give you similar safety and stability as the L-fence I am suggesting.
About the radiuses, perhaps try what Nick suggested: rout a short edge straight through, without worrying about the radius, then the long edge straight through, then the other short edge. It will leave you with an edge instead of a curve where the channels intersect, but that can be softened with a few strokes of a round rasp - less hassle than trying to follow the radius.
@Cherryville Chuck ,
Charles, like Rick I was taken with the idea of a horizontal table - I think Matthias Wandel had a design, and I also noted the one from MLCS. There was a particularly versatile all-steel model from an outfit called Hawk, I think. I even started gathering materials to make one, but did not proceed, as I was (and am) uncertain about the ability of a non-steel construction to handle the leverage imposed by a plunge router, particularly something beefy in the 2-Hp range. I only have plunge routers, and other than a trim router, none of them have the round-body spindle motor of say a Bosch 1617. I would be particularly concerned hanging one off of the plastic plate - I note you say to keep it as narrow as possible, but again one is limited by the size of the baseplate on a plunge router.
Which router did you use on your rig, and were there any problems with leverage?
That is pretty much what I did . Ran the bottom threw than the short sections . When it’s behind a fence it’s hard to see where the radius is located. I took a felt marker and made a mark where the router bit is to help visualize it.

I have no safety concerns , just found it awkward, and if they want another dozen or more I think I’d take the time and fab up a horizontal system such as the one Rob posted .
Wish I had less priorities right now, as I’d take the time my time build an elaborate one.

I’m using pc690 mounted under a tablesaw wing , and for now I just use the tablesaws reversible Excalibur’s fence for a guide .
I also have two pc7518 motors only(no bases),and they were suppose to go in a double router table someday to compete with MT Stringer. Hopefully I use them someday

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate

Last edited by RainMan 2.0; 05-10-2020 at 11:07 AM.
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post #12 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 11:30 AM
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@Cherryville Chuck ,
Charles, like Rick I was taken with the idea of a horizontal table - I think Matthias Wandel had a design, and I also noted the one from MLCS. There was a particularly versatile all-steel model from an outfit called Hawk, I think. I even started gathering materials to make one, but did not proceed, as I was (and am) uncertain about the ability of a non-steel construction to handle the leverage imposed by a plunge router, particularly something beefy in the 2-Hp range. I only have plunge routers, and other than a trim router, none of them have the round-body spindle motor of say a Bosch 1617. I would be particularly concerned hanging one off of the plastic plate - I note you say to keep it as narrow as possible, but again one is limited by the size of the baseplate on a plunge router.
Which router did you use on your rig, and were there any problems with leverage?
Long explanation here Biagio. The quick part is that I took one handle off and used the screw hole for it as one mount and also mounted it around the baseplate somehow and I don't rememeber exactly how I did that now. But when it was mounted you were looking at the original baseplate for it and not an insert plate. I think I may have also used holes at the top end of the "router" (quotes are there for a reason).

The explanation for that is that the router I was using was a big Freud plunge that had died on me and wasn't worth fixing. I took the armature out and stripped it bare and reamed an aluminum pulley out to fit the metric sized shaft and then cut a hole through the side of the casing and ran a belt around the pulley to a 1 hp 3450 rpm motor which I sped up with the pulleys to about 12,000 at the bit. It worked surprisingly well even with small bits as the 1hp capacitor type motor has probably 5 times the torque that a universal router motor has. It barely changed pitch in use. I had some pictures of it but I may have deleted them before realizing that deleting them from my uploads also deleted them out of the original threads. It was a true Frankenstein creation but it allowed me to make some picture frames I couldn't have done any other way and the picture of one of those is still on my first page of uploads. I don't still have it either. I hadn't used it for a while and it took up a lot of space and someone new was looking for that collet and I was going to give it to them but found out when I took it off that mine was broken in the same was as theirs. So I dismantled it.

I like Rob's setup. I think it's simpler to fix the router and move the table. Fixing the router means you can use a variety of methods to support it. The edge guide rod holes are one possibility. Using one or both of the handle mounts is another. And you could build a padded cradle for the top of the router to sit on and maybe screw a top clamp onto the cradle too. You can mount it securely enough that you really don't have to mount it to an insert plate if you don't want to which of course gives you more reach with your bits.
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post #13 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 12:41 PM
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I made the horizontal table featured in Fine Woodworking Feb 2001 edition. It took me one afternoon, and it works so well that I have a dedicated router on it, and use it for all my tenons. Fine height adjustment is by threaded bolt, and very accurate. If raising the bit above the table height, Charles' comment on feed direction is very important.
Rob, I believe you have put my misgivings to rest, and also made the case for simplicity, over the sophistication of the MLCS system. I cannot quite make out what is attached to the vertical board on the left hand side?
Thanks.
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post #14 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 02:18 PM
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@Biagio
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I cannot quite make out what is attached to the vertical board on the left hand side?
Are you talking about the thing on the left of the router? Just a magnetic sort of set-up to hold the collet spanner.
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post #15 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 02:23 PM
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WOW,
I just posted something to this thread and it just disappeared !!!

Here goes second attempt;
Rick,
I watch the Woodsmith Shop on PBS almost every Saturday. I record it then watch it during the evening, they are currently in the 3rd or 4th episode of building a router table that can be used horizontally and vertically. It looks strong and robust and capable of doing some cuts that a flat table simply can't. If I didn't have a mortising machine I think I would attempt to build it. If you check their website, you will probably find the plans but at a cost $.
Cheers, Dan
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post #16 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 03:01 PM
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Are you talking about the thing on the left of the router? Just a magnetic sort of set-up to hold the collet spanner.
Yes, that is the one. Rob, I donít have that particular issue of FWW, but I remember a similar arrangement in one of those collections of articles that FWW publishes from time to time. Am I correct in thinking that the vertical ďPlateĒ to which the router is attached, pivots on a fixed bolt on the left side, and the height adjustment occurs on the right? Could you post a photo of that part of the build? Thanks.
BTW, I have the big brother of that Startel, mounted permanently in a table. Big and heavy for handheld. Quite a lot of oomph, but I am sure I will have to put in better bearings before long. Has soft start and a digital speed readout and +/- button speed setting, the only problem is that on startup, it reaches max speed before throttling down to desired speed - kind of scary when there is a large diameter bit in the chuck. originally came with metric collets, but I was lucky to find the importers at the time - they had 1/2Ē collets and reducers. Now out of business. Apparently interchangeable with an Atlas Copco I have never seen on sale here (only a 1400W model was out for a while). I had notions of having the speed readout and control buttons at the front of the table, but too complicated. I have however modified it for above the table height adjustment - I do the gross adjustment with a hex bar in a portable drill, then fine adjustment with a hand crank.
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post #17 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 04:05 PM
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Biagio, I will take a picture of the set-up tomorrow morning - you are quite right in your assumption that the router "plate" pivots on a bolt, below left of the router.
The slot with the tightening knob on the right, is actually an arc, radiused (is that a word?) on the pivot bolt. The slot headed bolt screws into the wooden block, and the end of the bolt rests on a metal plate attached to the lower block. As you can imagine, this gives very fine height adjustment. The table is actually designed for a non-plunging router, but I removed the spring from this one, for ease of depth adjustment.
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post #18 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 05:39 PM
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They look really good Rick. I do agree with you it would be easier with a horizontal table. If I was going to do these all the time I'd build a large horizontail table that would support them well and probably use a large router to handle deeper cuts. I'd also charge too much for each one.

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post #19 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 07:00 PM Thread Starter
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They look really good Rick. I do agree with you it would be easier with a horizontal table. If I was going to do these all the time I'd build a large horizontail table that would support them well and probably use a large router to handle deeper cuts. I'd also charge too much for each one.
Well to build them from scratch isn’t a lot of money ,as all I needed was a 2x8.
But the wear and tear and the labour really adds up .
I’m thinking of telling them $50 a piece ,as I figure it will take me at least an hour to make one .
Sounds high for a 3’ piece of wood , but it all adds up .
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post #20 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 07:38 PM
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Well to build them from scratch isnít a lot of money ,as all I needed was a 2x8.
But the wear and tear and the labour really adds up .
Iím thinking of telling them $50 a piece ,as I figure it will take me at least an hour to make one .
Sounds high for a 3í piece of wood , but it all adds up .
You need to add in the cost of materials, new bits, brushes for the router, and a decent per hour labor charge. What do these normally cost? I would think they arn't cheap.

Mike
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