Bending boards made , but a horizontal router would have helped - Router Forums
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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-09-2020, 05:30 PM Thread Starter
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Default Bending boards made , but a horizontal router would have helped

I was given these boards and asked if I could put a groove in them to hold the cable .
There used in the telecommunications industry to maintain an engineered spec for the cable coaxial plant drip loops, which are for contraction and expansion during temperature variations.
I donít have my router table assembled yet , and just use a PC690 bolted under the wing of of table saw .
I used my reversible fence to hold the board ,then clamped a piece of mdf on the other side so the board wouldnít move,but I much would have preferred feather boards .

Anyways it wasnít bad until I got to the radiusís , as itís hard to navigate the board over the router bit.

I could see where having a horizontal router would have come in extremely handy . As a matter of fact , if they want a production run of these , Iíd be tempted to rig something up .
On the top of the board I just used my dado to make a 3/8Ē groove as a guide when itís held against the strand
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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-09-2020, 08:05 PM
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Looks like a slot cutter would take care of one of the cuts...

...and a cove bit of the right size would take care of the radius cut. Push it through, turn it over 180 and push it through again. No need for a horizontal router.

Possible...?

Nick

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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-09-2020, 09:10 PM Thread Starter
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Looks like a slot cutter would take care of one of the cuts...

...and a cove bit of the right size would take care of the radius cut. Push it through, turn it over 180 and push it through again. No need for a horizontal router.

Possible...?
Well there has to a better way . I used this ,but as long as there was something I could raise high enough to do the bottom half and then flip as you mentioned.
I should have got ideas from you guys before I proceeded
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I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-09-2020, 09:16 PM Thread Starter
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Ok I googled cove bit and that’s actually what I first tried , but i couldn’t raise it high enough . If they made it with the cove part facing the router it would have worked though.
Looking at it again it may have have worked with my Festool router as I may have able to lower it more.

I tried it in my pc690 and it’s base is mounted under 3/4” of particle board , but when raised the cove bit it wasn’t even close to where I need it

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate

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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-09-2020, 09:47 PM
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You might be able to find a round nose bit long enough. I made a horizontal setup once and it was the only way I would have been able to make the picture frame stock I Made. Here's one from MCLS: https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...ter_table.html With this the router raises up and down. The one I made had the table go up and down instead. You need a pretty stiff plate to mount the router to. Plastic is okay but keep it as narrow as possible so that it is as stiff as possible. You could make something in a day or two and the horizontal configuration gives you possibilities that a regular table doesn't allow. Keep in mind that if the bit is below your work feed direction is still right to left but if the bit is above your work feed direction reverses and you go left to right. I found out the hard way.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-09-2020, 09:56 PM Thread Starter
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You might be able to find a round nose bit long enough. I made a horizontal setup once and it was the only way I would have been able to make the picture frame stock I Made. Here's one from MCLS: https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...ter_table.html With this the router raises up and down. The one I made had the table go up and down instead. You need a pretty stiff plate to mount the router to. Plastic is okay but keep it as narrow as possible so that it is as stiff as possible. You could make something in a day or two and the horizontal configuration gives you possibilities that a regular table doesn't allow. Keep in mind that if the bit is below your work feed direction is still right to left but if the bit is above your work feed direction reverses and you go left to right. I found out the hard way.
Thatís a neat setup . Liking the knobs on the extruded aluminum to help lock it down .
Guess a cranks a must with vibration and all

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Ok ,I never insulate
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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 12:59 AM
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You'd never get an accurate setting without the crank. You'd need something to move it incrementally to the right setting either using the crank like they show or maybe a scissor jack underneath if you just wanted to cobble something together and didn't care how it looked.

On mine I made a table with sides and back like a shelf and then I added slots in the back with screws to tighten it in place and then threaded through some angle brackets so that I could lift the table with the height screws and then lock it in position by tightening the ones through the back. It took me a couple of days to make mine but I don't think I had a dollars worth of parts in it. It was pretty ugly but I was just making sure it would work. Once I found out it did there was no reason to improve it.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 02:21 AM
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@RainMan 2.0
Rick, what you have done looks pretty good to me. What are you concerned about, safety? I reckon if you are able to attach a higher false fence to your reversible fence, and make an L-shaped fence to trap the workpiece on the other side, it will be as good as you can get, with your current setup. If you were using featherboards, you would need double-height ones to give you similar safety and stability as the L-fence I am suggesting.
About the radiuses, perhaps try what Nick suggested: rout a short edge straight through, without worrying about the radius, then the long edge straight through, then the other short edge. It will leave you with an edge instead of a curve where the channels intersect, but that can be softened with a few strokes of a round rasp - less hassle than trying to follow the radius.
@Cherryville Chuck ,
Charles, like Rick I was taken with the idea of a horizontal table - I think Matthias Wandel had a design, and I also noted the one from MLCS. There was a particularly versatile all-steel model from an outfit called Hawk, I think. I even started gathering materials to make one, but did not proceed, as I was (and am) uncertain about the ability of a non-steel construction to handle the leverage imposed by a plunge router, particularly something beefy in the 2-Hp range. I only have plunge routers, and other than a trim router, none of them have the round-body spindle motor of say a Bosch 1617. I would be particularly concerned hanging one off of the plastic plate - I note you say to keep it as narrow as possible, but again one is limited by the size of the baseplate on a plunge router.
Which router did you use on your rig, and were there any problems with leverage?
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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 10:28 AM
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I made the horizontal table featured in Fine Woodworking Feb 2001 edition. It took me one afternoon, and it works so well that I have a dedicated router on it, and use it for all my tenons. Fine height adjustment is by threaded bolt, and very accurate. If raising the bit above the table height, Charles' comment on feed direction is very important.
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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old 05-10-2020, 10:50 AM Thread Starter
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I made the horizontal table featured in Fine Woodworking Feb 2001 edition. It took me one afternoon, and it works so well that I have a dedicated router on it, and use it for all my tenons. Fine height adjustment is by threaded bolt, and very accurate. If raising the bit above the table height, Charles' comment on feed direction is very important.
Loving the simplicity as this is what I was looking for , thanks for sharing .
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Ok ,I never insulate
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