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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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Default new work bench

so some time ago I came across the book "How to make woodwork tools" by Charles Haywaed
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http://toolemera.com/bkpdf/haywardhowtobk.pdf
and this weekend will be getting the boards to begin. before I start I thought I would post here and request any insight you real woodworkers would care to share with me.

The only big item I've built is my router stand and that was in a shop class at my local college under the guidance of a teacher.

This will be the first time I have done any mortise and tenon work and I am not sure if the bolt or the wedged tenon is what I want to do.

I understand the weakness of the wedge but what I don't understand is what I don't know about what he would then show both options etc.....

Or a better way to say this is "I don't know, what I don't know" Which is why I am asking you good people.

Thank you in advance for your input.
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 07:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcrusoe View Post
so some time ago I came across the book "How to make woodwork tools" by Charles Haywaed
HTML Code:
http://toolemera.com/bkpdf/haywardhowtobk.pdf
and this weekend will be getting the boards to begin. before I start I thought I would post here and request any insight you real woodworkers would care to share with me.

The only big item I've built is my router stand and that was in a shop class at my local college under the guidance of a teacher.

This will be the first time I have done any mortise and tenon work and I am not sure if the bolt or the wedged tenon is what I want to do.

I understand the weakness of the wedge but what I don't understand is what I don't know about what he would then show both options etc.....

Or a better way to say this is "I don't know, what I don't know" Which is why I am asking you good people.

Thank you in advance for your input.
David

My take on this - he shows both options because some people who build benches, etc. don't want to have any "mechanical" fasteners in their work, hence the wedged tenon.

I've built two "workbenches", one in my garage and one in my basement shop. Used bolts in the garage. Used threaded rod on the basement bench. The bench in the basement is used to hammer on, plane, well you name it. Never had a problem. And I can take it apart if I need to.

I guess you could say, I'm more of a "function" guy as opposed to a "form" guy. Form or function??

I'd say, use the technique that is "best for you".

Vince
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 08:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcrusoe View Post
so some time ago I came across the book "How to make woodwork tools" by Charles Haywaed
HTML Code:
http://toolemera.com/bkpdf/haywardhowtobk.pdf
and this weekend will be getting the boards to begin. before I start I thought I would post here and request any insight you real woodworkers would care to share with me.

The only big item I've built is my router stand and that was in a shop class at my local college under the guidance of a teacher.

This will be the first time I have done any mortise and tenon work and I am not sure if the bolt or the wedged tenon is what I want to do.

I understand the weakness of the wedge but what I don't understand is what I don't know about what he would then show both options etc.....

Or a better way to say this is "I don't know, what I don't know" Which is why I am asking you good people.

Thank you in advance for your input.
I believe it's about options and choices...
The bolted tenon would allow you to take up any looseness that will develop w/ use of the bench...
a tusk tenon is another option that would allow you to keep your bench tight...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortise_and_tenon
Attached Files
File Type: pdf TUSK TENON.pdf (111.7 KB, 149 views)
File Type: pdf Mortise_and_Tenon_Primer.pdf (1.09 MB, 136 views)

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 11:03 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks much for the links Sticks!

Another question to all, the angled front legs, good? And why isn't this type of bench with the front angled still in use, or is it and am I missing something?
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 12:24 PM
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Thanks much for the links Sticks!

Another question to all, the angled front legs, good? And why isn't this type of bench with the front angled still in use, or is it and am I missing something?
poor weight and shock transfer to the floor...
angled legs are primarily for narrow piece stability.. ie, saw horses....
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 12:30 PM Thread Starter
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poor weight and shock transfer to the floor...
angled legs are primarily for narrow piece stability.. ie, saw horses....
okay understood, thank you sir!
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 12:34 PM Thread Starter
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David

My take on this - he shows both options because some people who build benches, etc. don't want to have any "mechanical" fasteners in their work, hence the wedged tenon.

I've built two "workbenches", one in my garage and one in my basement shop. Used bolts in the garage. Used threaded rod on the basement bench. The bench in the basement is used to hammer on, plane, well you name it. Never had a problem. And I can take it apart if I need to.

I guess you could say, I'm more of a "function" guy as opposed to a "form" guy. Form or function??

I'd say, use the technique that is "best for you".

Vince





Thank you sir, after more research it looks to me like the bolt and screw allows tightening the joint over time. where the wedge would need to be completely replaced.

Also more research on this guy, he is like considered a god of woodworking!
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 01:20 PM
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A few of used cross dowels to join the stretcher to the legs. https://www.google.ca/search?q=cross...lDRx-tOFYsk%3D

This joint can be tightened if necessary although in 20 years I've never needed to. You can buy the dowels if you want or make your own out of steel rod. I know Lee Valley sells them and I'm sure there are other sources.

I wanted the widest stretcher I could to keep the frame rigid and I used a 2 x 10. Stick is right that you only need angled legs if the bench is small. They will be a tripping hazard on a large bench. You could have a look at a recent thread which is still ongoing as Neville has time and that is of his workbench build in this thread http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fix...workbench.html.
You can look at mine on page 4 of my uploads. You may find other examples using our Community Search.

One suggestion I would make is to think about what vise(s) you might add to it and see if there is any special construction that will be needed to mount it. It will be much easier now than later in most cases to accommodate for that.
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 01:45 PM Thread Starter
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One suggestion I would make is to think about what vise(s) you might add to it and see if there is any special construction that will be needed to mount it. It will be much easier now than later in most cases to accommodate for that.
Chuck thank you much for your detailed response, great info and I had seen the thread before so that is very helpful, part of my biggest problem with this site is SO MUCH information!

For Vises, I have an end vise and a front vice on my bunch now that I would move over and I have a single screw 15" that I am going to attempt to use for a leg vise.

Thanks again, now headed back to your uploads!
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-24-2015, 02:49 PM
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I used wedged tenons for the two end sets and bolts for the stretchers. This was about 25 years ago. After 4 moves, endless poundings, and all manner of abuse (including a month exposed to the rain), it's still totally solid - never had to tighten the bolts.
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Measure twice, cut once and CROSS OUT THE WRONG MARKS.
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