What Do You Do With Worn Flush Trim Bits - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-31-2016, 08:35 AM Thread Starter
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Default What Do You Do With Worn Flush Trim Bits

When a flush trim bit needs to be sharpened I have read that it will no longer work as a flush trim bit due to some of the edge being removed. Do you just use as a straight bit?
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-31-2016, 09:46 AM
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Flush trim bits are rarely flush to begin with.
If they are, they might cut the template!
It doesn't hurt to get a re-grind and if there's enough carbide, it can be done several times.
Notwithstanding, the regrind is never as good as the OEM grind.
As a rule, only the face of the flute is touched. The OEM hit, maybe hit 4-6 other surfaces the re-grinder would never do that.
So in my case, once they're dead, I scrap them.
Cutters are so cheap these days, it doesn't pay to have them sharpened!
And, yes, there is less diameter, but not much.
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-31-2016, 10:12 AM
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The diameter of the bit will be reduced by the amount necessary to re-sharpen the cutters.

If they just need a quick touchup (like with the Trend sharpening stuff) it might not change much (thousands)...but if you have nicks or such, chuck 'em...

In case you are not already, make sure you clean your bits with Trend or CMT bit and tool cleaner after each use...will make for longer, happier life...

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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-31-2016, 11:02 AM
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Professional regrinders have other sized bearings to replace the original with that are a few thou smaller and will compensate for the reduced diameter. I've seen somewhere where they were available for retail sale but I can't remember where. Like Pat said though, they are hardly worth it at the difference in cost. I have heard of professional woodworking shops that will save up a batch of worn bits and then send them out and by having a volume of them done it is cost effective.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-01-2016, 08:44 AM
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I like to use them as a preliminary cut bit. This removes most of the material, then when you hit it with a new bit, they stay sharper longer and just kisses the material for a finer cut. this really work for Plastic laminate.
I have also ground off the threaded nub on the bottom and just use it as a straight cutter.
Enjoy!
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-01-2016, 08:51 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottgrove View Post
I like to use them as a preliminary cut bit. This removes most of the material, then when you hit it with a new bit, they stay sharper longer and just kisses the material for a finer cut. this really work for Plastic laminate.
I have also ground off the threaded nub on the bottom and just use it as a straight cutter.
Enjoy!
Good idea for plastic laminate....I'm about to start making some plastic laminate countertops.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-07-2016, 08:47 AM
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I will also add an extra large bearing so I can cut off the excess without risk of kissing the surface. Then I go back with the bevel cutter.
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-07-2016, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by JIMMIEM View Post
Good idea for plastic laminate....I'm about to start making some plastic laminate countertops.
Try a solid carbide laminate bit, no bearing, once you use these I doubt you will ever use the flush bit again. No bearing and they cut much cleaner with no chance of hitting the front edge. I used the bearing style for years, until I got some of these.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-07-2016, 12:08 PM
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Clay you don't have any issues with the pilot burning the edge? That was the problem with the old HSS router bits with pilot.

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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-08-2016, 02:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
Clay you don't have any issues with the pilot burning the edge? That was the problem with the old HSS router bits with pilot.
NO, I never use HSS bits, these are carbide. I run vaseline down the front edge and the bit cuts fast and clean. I have laid a lot of laminate in my years, wish I had known this years ago. Plus they are cheaper.
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