Glue Joint Router bit Setup on stock - Router Forums
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-02-2016, 10:22 AM Thread Starter
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Default Glue Joint Router bit Setup on stock

I bought a Yonico glue joint bit and have a few questions. Bit diameter is 1.5125 inches(1 1/2") and is cutting length is 1.230" (1 1/4")

1) What is the minimum and maximum stock thickness one could use with it. Is it only for 3/4" thick stock or could for stoick as thick as the cutting length or larger?

2) Setup- If I set the bit up to route a true 3/4 piece of say maple, then go to use the setup on a piece of 23/32 ply thats a true .72 thick, will i have to reset the bit for the new stock?

3)Along the lines of question 2.We all know that no boards are exactly same thickness. If for example I buy 6' lengths of 1X6" maple boards from a lumber yard. Some boards may be exactly 3/4" thick and some may be a little more and less. If i set the bit up with a true 3/4 board and all the boards differ, How would this affect the overall fit, finish, etc. Thanks.

This bit is new to me so trying to learn a bit more. I've read about setting it uo: align the center of the bit to the the center of the wood and cutting one board up and mate down and test cut. Trial fit and if the "Down" board is higher then the "up" board then the bit is too high and vice if the "Down" board is lower than the "up" board than the bit is too low.
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-02-2016, 10:39 AM
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I have a glue joint bit but have never used it so can not help you there. If you are just gluing up 3/4" panels you do not need anything but glue and clamps.
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-02-2016, 10:42 AM
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1. 1 1/4 max. Even the tiniest little bit longer than that will leave a ridge.

2. Yes you will have to reset the bit. One of the downloadable bit catalogs had a section that showed how to set up their most difficult bits, I think it was either CMT or Amana. Basically you have to center the profile to the center of the board.

3. Yes that's a problem. It won't be much if the boards are close but there will probably be some variations.

Stick and I and a few others prefer to use splines instead of making glue joints. Glue joints use up some of the wood in making the profile, splines don't. Splines do just as well in lining up the board. One side is always flat as long as you fit the boards together so that the face that was down against the table or against the table saw fence during the milling of the grooves is on the same side for every board. The grooves can be milled on the TS and is much faster than using a router. The joint is at least as strong and likely stronger as long as the grain in the spline is crossways to the joint. Thin ply works very well for splines and it's cheap and easy.
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-02-2016, 06:13 PM
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Have studied the glue joint cutters.
Have designed several. 2 of them in this picture.
Max T for your cutter =~1.0".
Minimum is ~5/8", because you need some shoulder.
********************************
If thickness varies the work will glue up but won't line
up, face-wise. So all the work in a panel should be of
equal thickness.
Would not use plywood with a glue-joint cutter.
*******************************************
Glue joint cutters are designed to joint and produce the
profile in one shot. So un-edged material can indeed and should be jointed on the router table with your glue-joint cutter!
*******************************************
If the sticks are of equal thickness then exact profile centering is not essential. The adjoining boards will require a depth of cut (z-axis) adjustment, however.
You can get 2 boards of unequal thickness to line up.
But if every stick in your panel is a different thickness: All bets are off.
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-02-2016, 06:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
1. 1 1/4 max. Even the tiniest little bit longer than that will leave a ridge.

2. Yes you will have to reset the bit. One of the downloadable bit catalogs had a section that showed how to set up their most difficult bits, I think it was either CMT or Amana. Basically you have to center the profile to the center of the board.

3. Yes that's a problem. It won't be much if the boards are close but there will probably be some variations.

Stick and I and a few others prefer to use splines instead of making glue joints. Glue joints use up some of the wood in making the profile, splines don't. Splines do just as well in lining up the board. One side is always flat as long as you fit the boards together so that the face that was down against the table or against the table saw fence during the milling of the grooves is on the same side for every board. The grooves can be milled on the TS and is much faster than using a router. The joint is at least as strong and likely stronger as long as the grain in the spline is crossways to the joint. Thin ply works very well for splines and it's cheap and easy.
I totally agree with Chuck. Using splines is a whole lot easier, cost way less, and will add years to your life.
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-02-2016, 06:32 PM
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I use biscuits when its a small job. But Reversible glue bit is a my preferred method. Murphy's law applies whenever I route a biscuit joined piece Guarantee I will hit it. With the glue joint bit I think it looks good when your profile cuts through on a raised panel or table edge What we do in wood is like adult underwear It just "Depends"
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