lock miter bit - Page 3 - Router Forums
 60Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-18-2019, 03:10 PM
Registered User
 
CharleyL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Charley
Posts: 2,054
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
Here again is the Infinity set up jig. Note with the larger bit that there is a mark for the centerline. That park aligns with the center of the workpiece. Mark the center of the workpiece and line up the mark by adjusting height and you should be very close to perfect, with only a little bit of error. Still going to still make a trial cut, but the correction will be minimal. This is very similar to what Harry described. Tiny errors are barely visible, but people can feel an edge only 1 or 2 thousandths over. No matter what you'll want some extra stock to set up with.

The infinity bits work very well for me.

These Infinity gauges work quite well, but they are dependent on you finding and marking the exact center of your piece to be cut, and then setting the gauge on the bit and adjusting your router bit height or fence position so the exact center of the piece to be cut is in line with the long line of the gauge. I use the Rockler #56094 Center Finding jig, but any good means of easily finding and accurately marking the center of the thickness of your work piece will work.

The gauges work very well, once you understand how they need to be used. You really only need the larger gauge, because it will work for either size bit, if you have enough room around the small bit for it to fit between your router table and fence.
Tables with removable inserts won't have a problem. You can replace the insert after the bit height is set. I think they work much better than the setup gauges that you can get with the bits, because they take into account different thicknesses of the work pieces by adjusting the bit height or fence position based on the center of the work rather than one surface.

It may be of interest to know that the inventor of the Incra I-Box jig also invented these Lock Miter Master gauges. He is a member woodworking club that I belong to.

Charley

Central North Carolina
CharleyL is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-18-2019, 03:18 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 2,645
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Stoops View Post
AND remember to take the jig off the bit BEFORE you turn on the router.

Just saying,
Herb
After you forget to remove the gauge a cou[e pf time you will start to remember. Boy do I know what you are talking about Herb, I was of the opinion that I was the only dummy that made that mistake.

Since I don't of you as a dummy Herb, and that sounds like you may have made that mistake too, I feel that maybe Id am not quite the dummy that I thought I was.

It's good to see that it was pointed out to Harry that the Infinity gaubes are not restricted to a single thickness as set up blocks are. Harry is so familiar with such things that he probably has never had a reaon to look at the gauges.

The trick with the Infinity gauges is to be able to "see" the marks, they are made to work fo a person with a vision handicap. By the way, I am starting think of my vision issue as more of a blessing than a handicap. I have had to figure things out for myself which has added to my enjoyment that oormally slghted peopld have missed out on.

Jerry
Jerry Bowen is offline  
post #23 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-18-2019, 10:57 PM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 17,037
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
These Infinity gauges work quite well, but they are dependent on you finding and marking the exact center of your piece to be cut, and then setting the gauge on the bit and adjusting your router bit height or fence position so the exact center of the piece to be cut is in line with the long line of the gauge. I use the Rockler #56094 Center Finding jig, but any good means of easily finding and accurately marking the center of the thickness of your work piece will work.

The gauges work very well, once you understand how they need to be used. You really only need the larger gauge, because it will work for either size bit, if you have enough room around the small bit for it to fit between your router table and fence.
Tables with removable inserts won't have a problem. You can replace the insert after the bit height is set. I think they work much better than the setup gauges that you can get with the bits, because they take into account different thicknesses of the work pieces by adjusting the bit height or fence position based on the center of the work rather than one surface.

It may be of interest to know that the inventor of the Incra I-Box jig also invented these Lock Miter Master gauges. He is a member woodworking club that I belong to.

Charley
I also use the Rockler centering jig. Sharpen the heck out of the pencil first to get a fairly precise mark. Very easy to find the center with it. https://www.rockler.com/rockler-cent...t-marking-tool

I found some small round pencils at HD (orange, 12 per pack) that shapen to a needle fine point, that I use in this jig.
Attached Images
 

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
DesertRatTom is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-19-2019, 03:23 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Herb Stoops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Herb
Posts: 7,579
 
Default

It is easy to make one of those jigs, Just take a block about 6" long and draw a line down the middle, then drill 2 holes one on each end, and one exactly in the middle between them. the end holes are for the wooden dowels and the center hole for the pencil. It will let you find the center of any thickness board.

herb
DesertRatTom and jj777746 like this.
Herb Stoops is offline  
post #25 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-19-2019, 11:21 AM
Registered User
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Country: United States
First Name: Don
Posts: 2,603
 
Default

Where is Stick's opinion? I know he is reading this and going off the deep end.

What about using a spline on the inside of your mitered joint? No measuring, just cut them glue your spline in put them together and call it a day.

Don in Murfreesboro,Tn.

Measure once cut twice and it's still to short.
hawkeye10 is offline  
post #26 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-19-2019, 12:10 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,388
 
Default

I agree Don, the spline is much easier. Once yo set a saw blade and fence or make a jig then it does every piece exactly the same no matter where on the miter the spline lines up. With splines or biscuits I prefer to get the spline close to the heel of the joint so that I have more wood around it.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #27 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-19-2019, 04:10 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 2,645
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Stoops View Post
It is easy to make one of those jigs, Just take a block about 6" long and draw a line down the middle, then drill 2 holes one on each end, and one exactly in the middle between them. the end holes are for the wooden dowels and the center hole for the pencil. It will let you find the center of any thickness board.

herb
Here I go again, the method that I use eliminates drawing that line and trying to find the center of the stock which does have to be done. I use a dail caliper to determing the error created on a test cut. Once I know the error, I am able to make the adjustment due to accuracy of the Incra Master Lift. Instead of needing a line marked on the work piece, I measure to the spot on the profile where the male and felmale meet. By knowing where the center of the work piece is by measuring the thickness of it with the dial calipber and dividing that measurement by two and then comparing the error on the test cut with the depth finding end of caliper, the error is quickly determined and the precise adjustment can be made. No line to draw, no gauge to be used. It works very well for me.


I am wondering if most people that use the miter lock bit make their cuts in one singe pass, I can't do it and so I don't. I sneak up on the cut making several shallow passes. Just have to ask as most deoms that I dhave watched do make a single pas.

Making end grain cut in one pass are even worst for me but sneaking up solves that problem for me.


Jerry
jj777746 likes this.
Jerry Bowen is offline  
post #28 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-19-2019, 07:58 PM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 17,037
 
Default

A spline would be an easier solution and all done with a table saw, with a 45 degree blade angle for both the miter cut and the spline cut. Stop block on the miter gauge makes certain all cuts are identical.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
DesertRatTom is online now  
post #29 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-20-2019, 09:12 AM
Honored Member
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,685
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sreilly View Post
Now that looks like a MCLS bit or maybe Eagle?
I've had the two yellow bits for so-many years that I've long since forgotten from where they came. The black one was from a firm a few years ago that was liquidating all it's router bits at unbelievable prices. It was announced on the forum and discussed by several members. I bought heaps of them and never had a problem, a few I have never used. The ones in question are in the boxes, the rest are also shown. Building up a collection over the years means that just about anything can be routed.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	lockmitre-bits.jpg
Views:	30
Size:	97.7 KB
ID:	364535  

Click image for larger version

Name:	bit-storage4.jpg
Views:	29
Size:	56.6 KB
ID:	364537  

Click image for larger version

Name:	bit-storage2.jpg
Views:	30
Size:	46.9 KB
ID:	364539  

Click image for larger version

Name:	bit storage box0001.jpg
Views:	33
Size:	149.2 KB
ID:	364541  

Herb Stoops and jj777746 like this.

Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus







Last edited by harrysin; 01-20-2019 at 09:28 AM.
harrysin is online now  
post #30 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-22-2019, 11:57 PM
Registered User
 
CharleyL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Charley
Posts: 2,054
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye10 View Post
Where is Stick's opinion? I know he is reading this and going off the deep end.

What about using a spline on the inside of your mitered joint? No measuring, just cut them glue your spline in put them together and call it a day.


Although I have the lock miter bits and Lock Miter Master gauges, I have gone back to using full length spline grooves in my mitered joints and making cross grained splines to put in them, but sometimes for larger work, I'll use biscuits. Lock miter joints just take too much time to set up, can't be used effectively on plywood because of the resulting splintering and tear out, and the older ways are just easier and faster for me. Just as strong or stronger too. My methods still keep the joint from sliding out of line during glue-up too.

Charley
Herb Stoops and jj777746 like this.

Central North Carolina
CharleyL is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lock Miter Bit pusserboy General Routing 19 05-28-2018 10:19 AM
What lock miter bit would you recommend? adot45 Router Bits - Types and Usage 15 01-25-2015 10:26 AM
Has anyone used a lock miter bit? dustmaster Router Bits - Types and Usage 29 01-30-2011 07:53 AM
Lock miter bit for 3/8' pine lpret Router Bits - Types and Usage 8 04-28-2010 10:31 AM
Old Glossary Terms Mark Site Help and Suggestions 0 10-14-2008 02:30 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome