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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-01-2019, 05:13 PM Thread Starter
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Default Which Bit

Need to cut some 3/16" deep x 7/16" wide tongues on some ash. I'm doing it on my router table.

Using some scrap of the same dimension as the work piece, I started with a 3/8" straight bit but it splintered the ash. Then I went to a 5/32" 3-wing cutter and got better results. My question is, should I stick with the 3-wing cutter or should I use a rabbet bit? I don't cut the full dimension of the tongue in one pass. I incrementally work to it.

Another thing, is ash that brittle for it to splinter when routing?

Thanks in advance for any assist.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-01-2019, 06:09 PM
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slot cutter or dado blade and spline it..
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-01-2019, 07:13 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Stick. The spline is a great suggestion, but it's not applicable to what I'm doing since I'm attaching the edge of the ash to the face of another piece. Slot cutter it is.
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Last edited by OBG65; 06-01-2019 at 07:35 PM. Reason: Forgot some info.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-02-2019, 09:01 AM
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Be sure that you keep the board tight against the fence. If the board is long it could easily have a slight bend in it. For best results, a feather board on the top and sides would help.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-02-2019, 10:51 AM
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Biscuit joiners do a great job of end or edge to face joints if a lot of strength isn’t required. If strength is required then a floating tenon also works well.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-02-2019, 05:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OBG65 View Post
Thanks Stick. The spline is a great suggestion, but it's not applicable to what I'm doing since I'm attaching the edge of the ash to the face of another piece. Slot cutter it is.
it certainly is...
cut the face groove w/ a down spiral bit..
cut the edge groove w/ a down spiral bit also or the slot cutter..
blind spline it if you don't want to see the spline.....

the splintering may be the resits of dull or pitch loaded bit...
what brand of bits are you using...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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Last edited by Stick486; 06-02-2019 at 05:21 PM.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-03-2019, 09:36 AM
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Sometimes you can eliminate the splinters by doing a climb cut, or in other words, do a very light pass in the opposite direction then you would normally route. The goal is to score the edge so that when you go run the board the proper way it won’t chip out.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-03-2019, 07:42 PM Thread Starter
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Stick, Thanks for the spline tip. I'm using Whiteside Slot Cutters. The splintering was caused by a CMT straight bit. The vast majority of my bits are Whiteside, PRC, and CMT with some Freud, Infinity, and Amana in the mix. My low end ones are MLC, Woodside, and whatever I can find as throw away stuff.

Terry, I've climb cut before but never with a slot cutter. Would I have to reverse the bit's orientation on the arbor? That is, do I have to flip it?
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-03-2019, 07:57 PM
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Quote:
Terry, I've climb cut before but never with a slot cutter. Would I have to reverse the bit's orientation on the arbor? That is, do I have to flip it?


no...
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If only new layers hadn't been added....

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Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-03-2019, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OBG65 View Post
Terry, I've climb cut before but never with a slot cutter. Would I have to reverse the bit's orientation on the arbor? That is, do I have to flip it?

I didn’t suggest using a slot cutter, use your straight bits. Don’t do anything special with the bit, just a light pass left to right if using a router table, rather then the normal right to left feed direction. Hold on tight because it is harder to control.



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