SURVEY Your top 10 Bits - Router Forums
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post #1 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-08-2019, 12:58 PM Thread Starter
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Default SURVEY Your top 10 Bits

SURVEY for a router bit selection guide for new users...

Kindly copy this and add your response. We'll compile and tell how it turned out.

If you were just starting, knowing what you know now, in order, which 10 types of bits would you start with? OK to add more if you wish.



In order of your quality perceived, which brands of bits do you like best?



Looking forward to your feedback.

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post #2 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-08-2019, 06:52 PM
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Is there a downloaded form, or just make up stuff as we proceed?

ie
-a bunch of different sized roundovers (the more the better!)
-a nice selection of straight bits, with bottom cutting ability
-mortice bits (for dadoing for plywood panels...1/2" 5/8" 3/4" )
Those would be my 'can't do without' ones
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post #3 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-08-2019, 07:08 PM
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Spitball answer:

3/8, 1/4,1/8 round over
1/2 in flush trim
1/2 in pattern bit
1/2 and 1/4 in endmill
45 deg chamfer
Roman ogee
cove bit.

A surface planing bit would be nice, but I wouldn't put it in the top ten

As far as bit makers go, I am not that picky. I shoot for a balance of price and quality, but also availability. I like Magnate, Centurion, Whiteside and the other "upper shelf" brands, but have had surprisingly good luck with Grizzly "purple" bits, the "wood River" bits from Woodcraft (when they are on sale), Woodline, Oldham, etc. I have had mixed results with Eagle America ( shank was undersized), and didn't like the cheap MLCS bits.

Between estate sales, wood show deals, and the like I have bits of all makes and color, and most can be made to cut pretty well.
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post #4 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-09-2019, 10:13 AM
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Set of round over bits, both 1/4 and 1/2 inch shanks, depending on your needs
Flush trim bit
Pattern Bit
Several dado bits

Most of my bits are Yonico which serve my occasional needs just fine.
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post #5 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-09-2019, 11:49 AM Thread Starter
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Freeform answers will do. We would like LOTS of responses so everyone is represented.

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post #6 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-09-2019, 12:24 PM
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Chuck's response reminded me about the shank size part. Yup, roundovers in both 1/4" and 1/2" shanks.
I've been buying DIMAR, CMT, and Lee Valley bits, mostly online. And the odd Freud one from my local lumberyard; their selection is really limited.
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post #7 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-09-2019, 02:13 PM
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I would start with

1/2" pattern bit, this can be a straight flute or spiral flute, at least 2 flutes
1/2" flush-trim bit, if you do a lot of small projects I would also add a 1/4" flush-trim bit for tighter curves
1/8", 1/4", 3/8" round over bits
1/8", 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", straight bits and if you work with small slabs a lot that will be surfaced a 3/4" to 1" straight bit
If you will be working with larger slabs that require surfacing I would recommend 1" to 1 1/2" surfacing bit with 1/2" shank to be used with a large router. If you will be surfacing a lot I would recommend going with an insert bit so the cutting edges can be renewed easily.
a couple of round nose grooving bits 1/4" to 1/2" if you do smaller jobs or 1/2" to 3/4" if you do larger projects
V-bits in 60 degrees and 90 degrees, if you will be doing freehand signs a 45 degree would also be nice to have.
I would also add edge treatment bits, 45-degree champer with bearing, maybe one or two ogee bits wit bearings
If you will be doing a lot of freehand signs with smaller lettering or fine details an 1/8" collet and several different1/8" shank v-bits from 10 degrees to 60 degrees.
If you want to try your hand at small inlay work I recommend an inlay set with router bushing, collar and bit, 1/8" set for the smaller inlays or 1/4" for larger inlays. This takes the guesswork out of cutting both the pocket and inlay.

I like Whiteside and Amana bits but I also buy other brands if they are sale priced and I have a use for them now and then.

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post #8 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-10-2019, 01:25 AM
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I am fairly new to using a router--couple of years. I have found Infinity bits to be incredible. It is my go to. I also like CMT. Top ten bits for me would be

Flush trim double bearing 1/2" and 1/4" shafts
Mega Flush trim bit double bearing 1/2" shaft from Infinity (used as a cheap man's jointer).
Straight bit 1/2" shaft
Round over bits 1/2" shaft
Dado bits for undersized plywood 1/2" shaft
T-Slot bit
1/2" by 1/2" 14 degree dovetail bit 1/2" shaft
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post #9 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-10-2019, 12:10 PM
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If you were just starting, knowing what you know now, in order, which 10 types of bits would you start with? OK to add more if you wish.

1) SC50
2) 60 degree V
3) 90 degree V
4) Carving Liner
5) Sign Bit (sm. & lg.)
6) 1/2" Round Over
7) Spiral Up
8) Spiral Down
9) Chamfer
10)


In order of your quality perceived, which brands of bits do you like best?

Don't know about best, because I have a cheap set that I started with that I still use seven (7) years later, but I can't find them anywhere, and there was no name on them. However, over the years, I've evolved to using these, now.

Frued
Whiteside
Rockler

P.S. @DesertRatTom I read your instructions, Tom, as women usually do...

Forgive my lack of detail in comparison of the others. Of course, everyone knows I use my router(s) for signs. These are the bits I use the most when making them.

Barb


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Last edited by OutoftheWoodwork; 11-10-2019 at 12:29 PM.
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post #10 of 36 (permalink) Old 11-10-2019, 01:02 PM
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It seems that I use the round over bits more than not. I have them in 1/4 and 1/2 inch shank. And since I have a dual router table, I keep a flush trim bit in one router, and a 1/8th inch round over bit in the other. If I need to, I switch the 1/8th out for either the 1/4 or 3/8 inch.

3/8, 1/4, 1/8 round over
1/2 in flush trim
1/2 in pattern bit
cove bit

That's my story and I'm stickin' to it!
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