Bit for joining lengths end to end - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2014, 06:06 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
itdm5j21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Ian
Posts: 19
 
Send a message via Skype™ to itdm5j21
Question Bit for joining lengths end to end

Hello All,

Firstly, I'm very fortunate to have a new Dakota/Grizzly type router table and a new Hitachi 1/2 inch router ordered and am hoping to take delivery this week.

Once the items above are set up I would like to be able to achieve joining two lengths of wood together end to end. I believe there is a bit that cuts sharp peaks and troughs in order to increase the gluing surface and disquise the join. What bit would I need and which glue please for best results anyone?

Regards,
Ian.
itdm5j21 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2014, 06:47 PM
Moderation Team
 
Semipro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Country: United States
First Name: John_*
Posts: 6,445
 
Default

Ian
Finger joint bit.
Freud 99-039 Variable Height Finger Joint Router Bit with 1/2-Inch Shank
Semipro is offline  
post #3 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2014, 07:18 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 25,103
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by itdm5j21 View Post
Hello All,
which glue please for best results anyone?

Regards,
Ian.
thin application of yellow wood glue...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2014, 07:25 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
itdm5j21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Ian
Posts: 19
 
Send a message via Skype™ to itdm5j21
Default

Hi Semipro,

- many thanks. I put your info into a search engine and got very little available for the UK. However, Trend have a similar bit - deep breath by me here - not going to get much change out of £90.00 though, if I were to have one posted. I'm sure the bit is worth it though think I have to get into routing a bit(sic) more before I get confident enough to invest in and not end up damaging one of these bits.

Cheers,
Ian
itdm5j21 is offline  
post #5 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2014, 07:28 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
itdm5j21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Ian
Posts: 19
 
Send a message via Skype™ to itdm5j21
Default

Hi Stick486,

Thanks, I'll have to source some of that...

Cheers
Ian
itdm5j21 is offline  
post #6 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-09-2014, 07:54 PM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 13,960
 
Default

Ian; what are you joining? Are you talking about any kind of moulding or trim to go flat against another surface? Or just long lengths of freestanding material?
Scarf woodworking joints
DaninVan is online now  
post #7 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-10-2014, 02:56 AM
Registered User
 
Phil P's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Phil
Posts: 2,117
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by itdm5j21 View Post
I put your info into a search engine and got very little available for the UK. However, Trend have a similar bit - deep breath by me here - not going to get much change out of £90.00 though
Hi Ian

As you are in the UK I'd tend to start with UK suppliers - it can be somewhat easier. As has already been stated end jointing isn't very strong, regardless of which glue you use, because you are joining end grain to end grain whereas what you should try to achieve with a glued joijnt is long grain to long grain. If you sbsolutely can't do without it then maybe you should Google (in the UK) is "finger joint cutters". I'm with Dan about the scarf joints, though - far stronger and less costly to make but best made with a saw and a sharp hand plane. Another technique, depending on cicumstances is the loose tenon (or biscuit) in a slot which can be used for end joints if you are building something like a staved kitchen worktop (though not as strong as a scarf). Either the scarf or the loose tenon will give you more long grain jointing surface rather than the end grain to end grain of a end grain finger joint. In the event that you are still set on a finger joint then in the UK Wealden (very good supplier) sell both fixed sets and adjustable sets, Axminster Power Tool sells CMT bits (not all of them on the web site though, so you may need to ask), as well as their own pattern bit and Trend also sell a non-industrial model .

On the subject of glues, you are aware that aliphatic resin and PVA are almost the same product, aren't you? That said, I will yet again swim against the tide here and say that with modern, high performance glues such as D4 PVA a properly made and correctly cramped butt joint will be easier to produce, take less effort and work almost as well a micro-finger jointed joint. Surely butt jointing is something any woodworker needs to master? As a working and carpenter and joiner I've only ever seen finger jointing used industrially where a large amount of automation is in use and where the quality and lengths of timber (not to mention the skill of the staff) are potentiallty questionable - thus finger jointers have no place in my kit and I feel that the money is best used elsewhere. I've also rarely felt the need to buy high-priced aliphatic resins when there are locally manufactured alternatives available. I think the amateur woodwoking obsession with aliphatic resins is that people read American magazines but are generally ignorant of what's available on their own doorsteps - that and the fact that European manufacturers tend to adverstise a lot less

Regards

Phil

"Unfortunately there is lots of bad information online; some of it is really scary. It's probably not intentional, but I've seen some content that sets up the illusion that you can do whatever you want and get away with it" - Norm Abram in an interview with Jefferson Kolle

Last edited by Phil P; 12-10-2014 at 03:28 AM.
Phil P is offline  
post #8 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-10-2014, 03:08 AM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 13,960
 
Default

Exactly.
The lumber yards here tried to jam FJ studs down our throats, a few years back.
That idea died pretty quickly. You couldn't use it for scaffolding or anywhere there was any kind of sideways stress...basically expensive firewood.
Primed FJ mouldings weren't too bad but the Ultralight stuff pretty much killed that market as well.
DaninVan is online now  
post #9 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-10-2014, 03:33 AM
Registered User
 
Phil P's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Phil
Posts: 2,117
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
Exactly.
The lumber yards here tried to jam FJ studs down our throats, a few years back.
That idea died pretty quickly. You couldn't use it for scaffolding or anywhere there was any kind of sideways stress...basically expensive firewood.
Primed FJ mouldings weren't too bad but the Ultralight stuff pretty much killed that market as well.
Hi Dan

Though I was a bit off tack, in particuilar I'd missed-out scarff joints (thinking about short staved worktops), so I've edited my original post to reflect this.

I'm with you on the finger-jointed stock. we had a similar attempt here a few years back, but the stuff just cannot be used for anthing structural and I've ended-up rejecting and returning batches of hardwood (oak, mainly) skirtings (baseboards) and architraves because as soon as you stain or even clear lacquer the stuff the joints stand out a mile. Inevitably the architect or the customer will reject it - and I just don'y have the time to rework second rate stuff

Regards

Phil

"Unfortunately there is lots of bad information online; some of it is really scary. It's probably not intentional, but I've seen some content that sets up the illusion that you can do whatever you want and get away with it" - Norm Abram in an interview with Jefferson Kolle
Phil P is offline  
post #10 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-10-2014, 07:26 AM
Registered User
 
Peter Harrison45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Country: Australia
First Name: Pete
Posts: 145
 
Default

I don't know if i've missed something here or not ?? but whats wrong with a kreg doweling joint or a biscuit joint??
Peter Harrison45 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Craftsman 1-1/2HP 315.17491 router severe vibration with t&g bit danmancalif New Member Introductions 4 02-20-2014 12:41 AM
3/4in Depth cut rabbeting bit Rell Router Bits - Types and Usage 5 01-20-2012 12:16 PM
End Mills vs.Rrouter Bits For Mortising. Gaia Router Bits - Types and Usage 8 07-03-2010 01:37 PM
bit speeds, something to think about reible Router Bits - Types and Usage 0 10-19-2004 10:20 PM
RouterForums Amateur Night Rabbet bit Tables reible Router Bits - Types and Usage 1 10-10-2004 10:03 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome