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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 05:48 PM Thread Starter
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Default Advice on first bit

I am new to woodworking and have not yet bought my own router, a Triton MOF001, which is due in stock next month.

Before then I have to cut a hinge pocket on a replacement door and plan to do this using a simple jig. My brother has offered to lend me a fixed base router in the interim and, as I don't want to buy a template guide for it, I plan on using a 1/4" straight bit with top bearing rather than using a non-bearing bit with a template guide.

Is the bit I am considering the correct one for the job?

Once I have my own router I will buy my first basic set using the guidelines from other members in this section.

I spent the weekend replacing skirting boards and was pleasantly surprised at how well the mitres came out for my first effort although I did not do this with a router - just a Dremel SawMax

I am really looking forward to tackling some projects this year and first up will be some cabinets to keep my drills (and new router) in.
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 06:00 PM
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Hi, Alan; welcome (if I hadn't previously said so)!
Speaking only for myself here, you might want to consider a bushing and straight bit for doing the hinge mortises. I'm having difficulty figuring out how you'd control the depth of cut precisely with a bearing on there(?).
You still need some kind of template or pattern to get an accurate cut.
Maybe something like this...
https://www.kmstools.com/milescraft-...tise-kit-21175
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 06:37 PM Thread Starter
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Hi DaninVan.

I planned to make a simple jig that hooked over the edge of the door with a cutout for the hinge pocket and using a bit with a bearing and the depth set on the router to cut out the mortise. The bearing would follow the jig and the cutter would rout out the mortise to the appropriate depth

There is an example on finewoodworking dot com called a simple jig for hinges ( I cant post the link yet as I do not have enough postings to qualify)
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
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Hi DaninVan,

Thanks for the welcome.

I planned to use a simple jig like the one on finewoodworking dot com(search for "simple jig for hinges" as I can't post URLs yet)

The base of the router runs on the top of the jig and the bearing runs around the cutout with the depth set on the router itself. It seems like a simple process (says he who can't even sharpen a pencil without breaking the lead!) and as the hinges have rounded rather than square corners I don't even have to use a chisel.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 07:21 PM
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You can get mortising bits that are made for that job. They are quite short and only meant to cut 3/8 to 1/2" max. This lets them work better with your templates and for hinges you only need 1/8" of cut.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 07:41 PM
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Alan regardless of what bit you get you'll need the jig yeah. You can get small flush cut pattern bits but consider a template guide kit and straight bit, very diversified. It requires a smidge of initial thinking and the cleverness to keep a note book with all the combos and what their offsets are, but in the long run once you have the combinations sets written there's no more thinking involved.

If you go with the template set I suggest going with a brass set, the white metal guides have loosened up in the past, never had a brass guide loosen.

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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 08:00 PM
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Alan,

I'm surprised at the lack of response here!

Consider several things that will help you decide what is needed. First, look at the threads on this site recommending your first bits, there is tons of advise. Second, if you own a router, then sooner or later you will be buying guide bushings. Don't ignore the fact that they WILL make certain operations easier. Lastly, think twice about buying "sets" of bits. Some are good and some will provide profiles that will rarely or never get used. Look for basic sets if you do this. Buy cheap bits and then replace them with good quality (carbide) bits as you see which ones you do use the most.

At the very least buy: a pattern bit (bearing at either the top or bottom), a straight bit without a bearing, a round over bit, and perhaps a champher bit. These will get you started and from there you can add bits as the need dictates.

Bill

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 08:35 PM
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Be sure to double check the swing of the door and which end is top before you start routing. Many a door has been routed upside down and backwards.

Herb
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 09:12 PM Thread Starter
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Default Advice on first bit

Quote:
Originally Posted by schnewj View Post
Alan,

I'm surprised at the lack of response here!

Consider several things that will help you decide what is needed. First, look at the threads on this site recommending your first bits, there is tons of advise. Second, if you own a router, then sooner or later you will be buying guide bushings. Don't ignore the fact that they WILL make certain operations easier. Lastly, think twice about buying "sets" of bits. Some are good and some will provide profiles that will rarely or never get used. Look for basic sets if you do this. Buy cheap bits and then replace them with good quality (carbide) bits as you see which ones you do use the most.

At the very least buy: a pattern bit (bearing at either the top or bottom), a straight bit without a bearing, a round over bit, and perhaps a champher bit. These will get you started and from there you can add bits as the need dictates.

Bill
Hi Bill,

I agree with all you say and I do intend to buy some bushings and a range of decent bits once I have my router but it is a couple of weeks away from delivery.

I want to cut the hinge mortise this weekend and have the loan of a router but no suitable bit. I don't want to lay out for a set of bushings and a bit for the loaner as I would prefer to get bushings for my own when it arrives.

It sounds like a short flush cut (straight bit)with a top bearing will do the job for now.

Hmm...I don't know what is wrong with my posts - this is the 2nd time I seemed to have a duplicate post. I think it is our gateway - things at work travel through it so slowly that it appears the browser is not responding and I have to close it and resubmit.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-18-2015, 09:13 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the Heads Up...that's the sort of mistake I make when cutting Internal/External Mitres and causes my wife no end of amusement

:-)
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