Routing in Hickory - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-20-2015, 03:48 PM Thread Starter
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Default Routing in Hickory

I'm having a bit of trouble when routing in Hickory. The router is Milwaukee 5616-20, 2 1/4 hp, variable speed. The particular bit I'm have trouble with is a Rockler 22627. Both router and bit are new. Router is mounted to router table with sufficient "hold-downs " and guides. This bit removes quite a allot of material per pass.

Should I be using the highest speed for this very hard wood? I seem to be causing the router to jam and overwork even when feeding slowly. There is also a tendency to shatter or splinter-out. Would you suggest two passes to make to cut?

Any of your suggestions or seasoned advice will be appreciated.

Doc
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-20-2015, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by gregkau View Post
I'm having a bit of trouble when routing in Hickory. The router is Milwaukee 5616-20, 2 1/4 hp, variable speed. The particular bit I'm have trouble with is a Rockler 22627. Both router and bit are new. Router is mounted to router table with sufficient "hold-downs " and guides. This bit removes quite a allot of material per pass.

Should I be using the highest speed for this very hard wood? I seem to be causing the router to jam and overwork even when feeding slowly. There is also a tendency to shatter or splinter-out. Would you suggest two passes to make to cut?

Any of your suggestions or seasoned advice will be appreciated.

Doc
or in three passes....
how much are you trying to remove in one pass... all of the required material???
explain jamming a bit more if you will please... you may have dulled your bit...
try a Fred quadra cut or a Whiteside...

there are around 6 or 7 hickories that are most often used... which one are you using???

Hickory is a wood that does splinter easily...
some basic issues w/ Hickory...

Workability: Difficult to work, with tearout being common during machining operations if cutting edges are not kept sharp; the wood tends to blunt cutting edges. Glues, stains, and finishes well. Responds well to steam bending.

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”

Last edited by Stick486; 01-20-2015 at 05:10 PM.
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-20-2015, 05:04 PM
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The particular bit I'm have trouble with is a Rockler 22627.

Doc
couple of suggestions...

remove as much material as you can w/ your table saw before you start machining on the router table...

do the cuts in 3 passes... take 90% of the total depth of cut and remove this material in two passes... the last 10% w/ a 3rd pass to complete...

Freud Tools | 2-3/4" (Dia.) Lock Miter Bit

http://www.amazon.com/Whiteside-Rout...N%3DB000K2G56Q

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”

Last edited by Stick486; 01-20-2015 at 05:07 PM.
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-20-2015, 07:38 PM
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Everything Stick said. And...back up the cut with a piece of sacrificial wood pushed behind your stock. Especially if you're cutting across the end grain.
earl
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-21-2015, 01:50 PM
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Everything that has been said is good advice, One other thing thing is that some router cutters, generally the cheaper ones, they are not the same quality as the best cutters and best cutters are sharper and they cut better, I do say that woodworkers should not buy any of the cheaper cutters as they are not value for money, don't buy router cutters sets, those big sets, as they are full of cheap cutters that you will likely never use, so just buy good branded cutters and keep them sharp when they need it, just buy the cutters that you have work for and buy the best brand that you can afford, good cutters are worth spending the money on them to keep them in good nick, and do the other thing. don't take big cuts in one pass, the final cut should be the lightest. I have been trying to buy some Hickory here in Australia but it is not imported here so there seems to be no way to get some and as I was asked to get some for a Billiard cue then it needs top be 1 1/2 square and 5 feet long, and suitable wood for a cue, so not easy to post that, not easy to find out which one of all the Hickory's would be the best one of them to use either, the only way to get the wood here is to buy a sledge hammer that has a Hickory handle and cut the head off it in some type of formal execution, maybe put a hood over its head so it does not see the axe fall, waste of time as there would be no way to find out which Hickory was used for the handle so it would not be the correct one anyway, looks like that Hickory cue is in the too hard basket for a while N

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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-21-2015, 02:21 PM
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Pecan is often used as a Hickory substitute...

hickory and pecan usually isn't separated at the mills... when they are they are called true hickory and pecan hickory.

They are in the same genus, just different species.... They are almost always sold as one. The fact is that there are 4 species of true hickory (pignut, shellbark, shagbark and mockernut) and 4 species of pecan hickory (water, bitternut, pecan and nutmeg).

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-21-2015, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you, I'll reduce the speed and make several passes to accomplish the cut. If unsuccessful, I'll splurge for the Frued bit.
I appreciate all of the responses and sage advice. Doc
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-23-2015, 01:31 AM
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Default Sharp carbide reduced speed

After several thousand feet of hickory two things are certain, high quality carbide bits and multiple passes are the only chance. Whiteside an Infinity router bits work great. Take a minute to look at grain direction in hickory, it is dense and changes often, thus speed kills. Slow down, nothing's a guarantee with hickory but sharp carbide and slower speed. Happy routing! Amazing results come from hickory!
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