cutting a 3/4' wide rabit - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 08:42 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 28
 
Default cutting a 3/4' wide rabit

What would the best bit to use to make a 3/4" rabit a 1/4" deep on the edge of 3/4" baltic birch plywood, can't seem to find a rabiting bit that wide.

You only need four words to have a successful marriage "oh,really,I'm sorry"
curly1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 08:57 AM
Registered User
 
Phil P's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Phil
Posts: 2,117
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by curly1 View Post
What would the best bit to use to make a 3/4" rabit a 1/4" deep on the edge of 3/4" baltic birch plywood, can't seem to find a rabiting bit that wide.
Hi Dan

You can get them, for example there's this rebate cutter available from Wealden in the UK (I know, not much use to you) which goes up to 26mm (just over an inch)

There should be someone in N-A doing a similar tool, somewhere

Regards

Phil

Edit: Found one: Amana 49360 Super Rabbet. This looks almost identical to my Wealden cutter. Possibly from the same factory in Israel? Big heavy cutter. Needs to be used with care

"Unfortunately there is lots of bad information online; some of it is really scary. It's probably not intentional, but I've seen some content that sets up the illusion that you can do whatever you want and get away with it" - Norm Abram in an interview with Jefferson Kolle

Last edited by Phil P; 03-05-2015 at 09:07 AM.
Phil P is offline  
post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 09:10 AM
Registered User
 
DonkeyHody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Country: United States
First Name: Andy
Posts: 901
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by curly1 View Post
What would the best bit to use to make a 3/4" rabit a 1/4" deep on the edge of 3/4" baltic birch plywood, can't seem to find a rabiting bit that wide.
I would make that cut with a dado blade on the tablesaw, but I assume you want to use a router. Take the widest straight bit you have and set it to 1/4 deep. Use your fence or edge guide to cover most of the bit so you only make very light passes. The first pass needs to be very light to avoid splintering. Keep making adjustments to your fence or edge guide until you get your rabbet 3/4 wide.

“We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it and stop there lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hot stove lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove lid again and that is well but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore.” - Mark Twain
DonkeyHody is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 10:06 AM
Registered User
 
PhilBa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Country: United States
First Name: phil
Posts: 1,046
 
Default

A rabbit is a dado at the edge of board. Look at the various "exact width" dado jigs.

I agree that the best approach is a table saw with a dado blade but a router can produce good results too.
PhilBa is offline  
post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 11:38 AM
Registered User
 
Ghidrah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Ronald
Posts: 1,466
 
Default

Go to Freud and look up mortising bits they have a full range up to 1 1/4" diam

Never bite the hand that looks dirty!
The more you know the more you're worth
Ghidrah is offline  
post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 11:57 AM
Registered User
 
DonkeyHody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Country: United States
First Name: Andy
Posts: 901
 
Default

[QUOTE=PhilBa;552417]A rabbit is a dado at the edge of board.

A rabbit is a small furry animal with a proclivity to procreate. Also known to eat carrots and say "Whats Up Doc?" Sorry, I just couldn't resist . . .

“We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it and stop there lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hot stove lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove lid again and that is well but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore.” - Mark Twain
DonkeyHody is offline  
post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 12:00 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 24,682
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by curly1 View Post
What would the best bit to use to make a 3/4" rabbet a 1/4" deep on the edge of 3/4" Baltic birch plywood, can't seem to find a rabbiting bit that wide.
call it a mortising bit instead...
or a straight bit...

Freud Tools

Freud Tools

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 03:57 PM
Registered User
 
Phil P's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Phil
Posts: 2,117
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBa View Post
A rabbit is a dado at the edge of board. Look at the various "exact width" dado jigs.

I agree that the best approach is a table saw with a dado blade but a router can produce good results too.
Actually the fastest, safest and cleanest approach is a spindle moulder (shaper) with a shear cut rebate block (and a Shaw or SUVA guard on the fence)....... But I'm only saying that because I have that particular set-up. A router table with a largish diameter cutter could do just the same in multiple passes. Out on site the rebate cutter is streets better than a straight cutter in the router and a router fence simply because of the tendency to "dip" at the ends of the cut when working "freehand"

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonkeyHody View Post
A rabbit is a small furry animal with a proclivity to procreate. Also known to eat carrots and say "Whats Up Doc?"
I thought a Rabbit was a small furry VW. . . . . .

Regards

Phil

"Unfortunately there is lots of bad information online; some of it is really scary. It's probably not intentional, but I've seen some content that sets up the illusion that you can do whatever you want and get away with it" - Norm Abram in an interview with Jefferson Kolle

Last edited by Phil P; 03-05-2015 at 06:35 PM.
Phil P is offline  
post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 06:15 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 14,870
 
Default

I see you have a jointer. If the pieces aren't assembled that's the machine I would use. You have to make sure it's set properly on scrap before you run the good stuff.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-05-2015, 06:54 PM
Registered User
 
russmatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Russ
Posts: 8
 
Default

If you have access to a router table with a lift, "sneaking up" with gradual increases in both the depth and width is the way to go. If not, gradual depth increases, followed by gradual width increases, will give you a better result than trying to find a bit to do the whole thing at once. Think about it this way.. In the time it takes you to drive to a supplier and buy a different bit, you could have increased the depth and width 1/16" at a time and ended up with a very smooth finish with no errors. Working carefully and gradually is always more accurate and safer (!) than speeding through things. Thomas Chippendale's workers in the 18th c. did all he directed with hand tools with no power, and their stuff is good enough for museums. If you are running a production shop, on the other hand, get yourself a 220 volt Shaper and you can get cutters big enough for one pass to do damn near anything.


russmatt, Pa, USA
russmatt is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
dado blade for spline joining sjonesphoto Tools and Woodworking 34 03-11-2014 11:11 AM
Cutting Boards Christmas Gifts oldwoodenshoe Show N' Tell 15 12-19-2013 11:32 PM
Cutting out Circles and Arcs the Easy Way learnexperience Portable Routing 1 11-26-2011 01:29 PM
Bit for cutting slot for Miter Track Racer2007 Table-mounted Routing 4 08-31-2011 11:01 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome