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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-31-2007, 06:59 PM Thread Starter
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Default Bit for jointing question

Which would be a better bit to use for edge jointing boards for glue up using a router table. Spiral down cut bit, flush trim bit or standard straight bit?

Thanks,
David
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-31-2007, 07:25 PM
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Hi David

I would suggest using the UPCUT (1/2" ) Spiral Flush Trim Router Bit.
The standard straight bit work with a chopping action unlike a spiral bit..
that's to say the straight bit hit the stock flat on the blade...think of it
like a drill bit...it pulls the chips out of the way..(Skew Angle/Helix)

You don't need the bearing on the bit but they make it easy to setup the bit for
edge jointing boards on the router table..

Spiral Flush Trim Router Bit

Get state of the art results in flush trimming, pattern or template work.
The 2 flute solid carbide spiral bits have two ball bearing guides.
Great for use where chip-out is a concern with plywood, melamine or other laminate surfaces.

Downcut bit is for hand held router applications. Upcut bit is for table mounted router applications.

Overall length for 1/4" bit is 3" and for 1/2" bit is 3-3/4".
As seen and recommended in WOOD® Magazine (#158).


Spiral Upcut and Downcut Router Bits


2 flute flat bottom cutters.
Top quality micrograin solid carbide.
Will cut faster, smoother and stays sharper longer.
Produces a very clean, fast and accurate cut with minimal chatter.
Upcut spiral helps remove material.
Ideal for making mortise and tenon joints.

Downcut spirals help hold the material in place while using handheld routers.
Will plunge cut and plane edges.
Eliminates chipping at the top of the cut.
Ideal for soft & hard woods, plywoods & composites, laminates, plastics and some non-ferrous metals.



http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shops...ushtrim_anchor



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Last edited by bobj3; 10-31-2007 at 07:47 PM.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-31-2007, 07:51 PM Thread Starter
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I thought a down cut was better for table use because it would drive the waste material up and away from the router whereas the up cut would pull the material down onto the router??

David
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-31-2007, 07:58 PM
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Hi David

I only know what the Mfg.of the router bits tell me...

HI David I should note it's not a big deal when you are using the bit to joint the edges because the Vac. pickup should just pull the chips up and away...

But if you are using the trim bit to make templates or just timing the stock it's not a big deal because most of the chips will be on the top of the router table anyway....

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Last edited by bobj3; 10-31-2007 at 08:19 PM.
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-31-2007, 08:22 PM
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I use a shear cutting flush trim bit. It seems to work OK.

Doug
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-31-2007, 10:06 PM
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A lot of the mags advise to use the bit Bj is recommending as well. I bought the one from Oak Park ... same type Doug refers to I believe to use with the Oak Park jointing fence.
http://us.oak-park.com/catalogue.htm...product=42-116

Corey

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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-01-2007, 08:20 PM
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I asked the same question Challagan asked a few weeks ago. Because I had read that large diameter straight bits avoid the chopping action common to smaller ones. I have some spiral bits, but although everyone here on this forum seemed to favor them, I still wanted a large diameter straight bit with fairly long cutters. The diameter means that the cutting edge is shearing, rather than chopping because the angle of attack (to the wood) is more oblique.

Earlier this week, when I stopped off at the saw-sharpening shop in town, the owner told me he had a 1.75" diameter straight bit for $25. He's getting rid of his inventory and retiring. 1 3/4" is talking my language. I will try it out and report back here. The bit was made by Everlast, makers of the very best tablesaw blades, according to my saw-sharpener buddy.

He sells wood equipment and sharpens blades for 12 lumber mills up here near the Oregon border. The Everlast saw blades he sold me are quite impressive.

Gary Curtis
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-01-2007, 09:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garycurtis
I asked the same question Challagan asked a few weeks ago. Because I had read that large diameter straight bits avoid the chopping action common to smaller ones. I have some spiral bits, but although everyone here on this forum seemed to favor them, I still wanted a large diameter straight bit with fairly long cutters. The diameter means that the cutting edge is shearing, rather than chopping because the angle of attack (to the wood) is more oblique.

Earlier this week, when I stopped off at the saw-sharpening shop in town, the owner told me he had a 1.75" diameter straight bit for $25. He's getting rid of his inventory and retiring. 1 3/4" is talking my language. I will try it out and report back here. The bit was made by Everlast, makers of the very best tablesaw blades, according to my saw-sharpener buddy.

He sells wood equipment and sharpens blades for 12 lumber mills up here near the Oregon border. The Everlast saw blades he sold me are quite impressive.

Gary Curtis
Gary, wow that is a huge bit The bit that I posted above actually is a straight bit but the carbide cutting edge is not the normal straight cutting edge. It is actually on a angle that wraps around the diameter to some degree... making a shearing cut. I don't think it will still produce as fine as a cut as a spiral just for the reason in how spirals are ground. For the most part spirals work the best to produce smooth cuts... they produce more shavings than dust. Similar to how a plane leaves small cuttings... sprials do the same thing .... instead of dust because they are doing more than just rubbing it.. it's cutting it more like a fine blade. Let us know how that mega bit works out!

corey

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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-13-2007, 08:55 AM
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I’m VERY green in my routing experience but I know one thing I want to use my table for is either preparing wood for joining or “ripping” wood precisely after I get it close on my table saw (my table saw is not 100% accurate).

BJ looking at that link the largest bit they have for a ¼” shaft is a ¼”… I take it this will work ok as long as I don’t try to remove too material at once? Say if I rip a piece of wood to about 1/8” of where I want it to be, then finish it on the router table?
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-13-2007, 09:37 AM
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Hi, Nick

Ist.let me ask why is your table saw not 100% accurate ?

If you take the time to do a tune up on your table saw it should be 100% accurate

Just about any table saw can be reworker to cut right, it may take a bit of time but it's worth it in the long run...

You can't make it square and true if you don't start out that way..

Then let me say the router table is not a jointer it can be used as one but it's not the same the fence on most router tables is only about 16" on the out feed side and most of the time that's just a bit short to get it right on the button for most stock.works great on short boards..

If you don't have a jointer a LONG hand plane works great for this type of job...but it's best to have the table saw do the work..with a great blade and and a true table saw most of your work is done right on the table saw...

You may say I don't have a high end table saw, I would say most don't it's just the way it's setup, it can be a lower end one, it's just takes a bit longer to setup the cut double checking the fence with a square b/4 you push the stock over the blade..

All table saws come with slots in the table top and with a sled that runs in both slots it's hard not to get a true cut... you can almost put your fence on a hook when you use the sled way of cutting your stock true...it's hard to not use the fence to rip long stock but most of the time most of your projects will need short parts and the sled can do them easy...and ..true...




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