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post #41 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 10:41 AM
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A sobering experience, for sure. Thanks for sharing. Happy that your injury was, in the end, not as serious as it might have been.

Say it with me: the table saw is the most dangerous tool in the shop.

FWIW, I am obsessed with safety in the shop, but when I have to remove safety gear from the table saw, I get conflicted. Here's my situation.

I have a Craftsman table saw, 10 years old. Very nice saw, but no splitter behind the blade if I remove the blade guard, which I hate to do. When I do remove the blade guard for a dado or narrow rip, I always use the GRR-Ripper. I have 3 of them, set up for different cuts & thicknesses, and I HIGHLY RECOMMEND this product.

When the blade guard IS in place (always preferred), then I can make rips as narrow as 3/4". I always use a push stick, of course, and I have a pair that have an aluminum blade with plastic handle. The metal blade is much stronger than plastic, of course, and I've thrown away every plastic push stick I've ever tried when it bends. They all do.

The aluminum blade slips between the blade guard and fence in a narrow space, allowing me to keep the blade guard in place down to a 3/4" rip. On the one occasion (one!) that the aluminum blade (barely) touched the blade, it deformed slightly on the tip, and the work piece went through the blade without a hitch. The Woodworker II was not damaged either.

So, for me, a GRR-Ripper for rips under 7/8", and a blade guard & aluminum push stick for every other rip.

Your mileage, of course, may vary.

Henry
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www.MowryJournal.com
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post #42 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 11:33 AM
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Re: the flipping Grrripper. As you get near the end of the rip cut, the gripper may not have enough traction on the board to move it forward, so it is tempting to move it back over the end to push forward. If something slips, the Grrripper could easily slip off,flip up and flip again (if it hit the blade), and there goes a couple of digits. The safety really comes from the device's downward pressure, use it tilted to push with, removes that down pressure, and thus, the safety factor.

Probably the best cure is to occasionally renew a layer of wax on the table to ease movement of the workpiece. You can get a replaceable tab for the Gripper to get a grip on the back end of the board. But a little wax couldn't hurt.

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Last edited by DesertRatTom; 02-04-2017 at 11:38 AM.
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post #43 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 11:34 AM
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O-o-o-o-h, that hurts!!!!
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post #44 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paduke View Post
Sorry about your hand Herb. I make my own push sticks from 3/4" plywood scraps. They are similar to the shape of your plastic one. If I am ripping something narrower than 3/4 the push stick gets a kerf (why doesn't spell check accept that spelling of kerf?) in it. When it gets chewed up I make another. Usually there are 3 or 4 laying around the shop
I do have a GRRRipper, and do use it a lot. But still make push sticks out of 1/2" plywood, toss when chewed up, make a new one. Even when using the GRRRipper tho, often use a push stick on the side. But if just using a push stick to push, I ALWAYS use another push stick to apply pressure from the side, either that or use may hand - with it waay in front of the blade, but usually a push stick. I've seen plastic push sticks that are solid, even used some until they got chewed up, but that thing with the holes I would probably just toss before using it.

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Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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post #45 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 01:07 PM
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Sorry to hear of the accident Herb. All the best for a speedy recovery.

I use the Gripper approach routinely as well as the thin strip jig advocated by Tom and Tom. However I upgraded to the one from Lee Valley as I beleive it is a bit more stable. When ripping thin strips I also tape a vacum hose up by the blade which then sucks the thin strip away from the blade as soon as the cut is finished. I think this approach was originally described on the forum but I don't recall the post.
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post #46 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 02:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paduke View Post
Sorry about your hand Herb. I make my own push sticks from 3/4" plywood scraps. They are similar to the shape of your plastic one. If I am ripping something narrower than 3/4 the push stick gets a kerf (why doesn't spell check accept that spelling of kerf?) in it. When it gets chewed up I make another. Usually there are 3 or 4 laying around the shop
Like Bill I make my own, I have not seen a plastic one shatter like that but thinking about it I can see how it happened, Tables saws require the utmost care, I'm not blaming you but you need to make sure a push stick does not contact the blade, timber and ply pushers are safer as they just get nicked and need to be remade, there is a good lesson here, plastic ones can shatter so we can see now that they do. N
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post #47 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 04:24 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by neville9999 View Post
Like Bill I make my own, I have not seen a plastic one shatter like that but thinking about it I can see how it happened, Tables saws require the utmost care, I'm not blaming you but you need to make sure a push stick does not contact the blade, timber and ply pushers are safer as they just get nicked and need to be remade, there is a good lesson here, plastic ones can shatter so we can see now that they do. N
I agree with you and everyone else on the forum, that it was operator error mostly. But I wanted to point out what happens to plastic as opposed to wood. As I said before ,I liked that pusher, it was heavy and felt good and kept my hand away from the saw.
I think the draw backs are that plastic is more brittle than wood and more slippery where it does not have as much friction between the wood and the pusher.

In any event I just ordered the full meal deal of 2 grrippers. based on what you guys have said about them.

Herb
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post #48 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 05:14 PM
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That's great Herb. Now go watch the Micro Jig Videos.

Here is one of them, kind of an introduction, but there are many on YouTube.
They sell the DVD, but they should be giving them away with each Grripper sold.

Charley
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Last edited by CharleyL; 02-04-2017 at 05:16 PM.
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post #49 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
That's great Herb. Now go watch the Micro Jig Videos.

Here is one of them, kind of an introduction, but there are many on YouTube. https://youtu.be/lDUg_lfculQ They sell the DVD, but they should be giving them away with each Grripper sold.

Charley
Charley , that videos made a believer out of me . I'm going to take mine out of its box .
So much for overhead dust collection

I don't know anything about CNC router tables , but I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night
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post #50 of 84 (permalink) Old 02-04-2017, 11:13 PM
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Just noticed that the Rockler thin strip jig went on sale for $20.

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