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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-17-2010, 06:59 AM Thread Starter
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Default Index of Dust Collection Solutions and Comments

The information in this sticky must be updated but due to the limitation of the forum program it is not possible to publish it here. These links are included in the new article which is located here: http://www.routerforums.com/woodwork...important.html

This is a reference point for small dust collectors.

Please note that a recent update to the Bill Pentz website makes it a must read for everyone! Bill is living with the effects of dust damage and has undertaken to educate himself, and generously, us, with what really happens when you don't take dust control seriously.

You must realize that in the days of hand tools, little dust was created and was not an issue. Modern machines create so much dust as to absolutely require control. It doesn't have to cost a fortune. You'll realize that with Bill's research. It does have to be taken seriously.

Building Dust Collector A general thread.

Chris' Rockler Small Dust Collection Separator Review

Cassandra's custom dust collector

Santť's homebuilt dust collection installation and design Even if you don't read French, this is well worth the look see. Pictures can say a thousand words. If you have any questions, just ask. Santť reads and writes English and there are other members who speak French.

The Thien Cyclone Lid.

BillPentz.com :: Dust Collection Research

The Dust Deputy - Video

Who or what have I missed?

Allthunbs

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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-19-2010, 03:57 PM
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Great collection of information Ron, lets Sticky this!

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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-14-2010, 09:41 PM
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Great information we have a 2HP DC2000 for chip/dust and a AC1000 air cleaner both work great but we still use a shopvac with some of our machines and set ups!
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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-15-2010, 05:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RCCHRE View Post
Great information we have a 2HP DC2000 for chip/dust and a AC1000 air cleaner both work great but we still use a shopvac with some of our machines and set ups!
You bring up two issues, dust collection and air cleaning. There are a variety of answers to both requirements. For those people starting out, the shop vacuum with a cyclone lid (of some sort) for dust collection is adequate. The links above address that option.

The air cleaning is a separate issue. You can buy fine filter air cleaners but they all work the same way: air being blown around and sucked through a filter. I accomplish this with a 20" box fan (garage sale special) and a 20" furnace filter taped to the intake side of the fan. You can get these filters down to 5 micron filtering. There are two objectives here, to reduce the bio hazard of working in wood dust and to eliminate spontaneous combustion from dust laden air.

I did an experiment once with dust and I can tell you it really explodes. Gave me a 20' high fireball per shovel full of sawdust thrown into a barrel from about 4' above the barrel.

When we're starting out, we often overlook safety simply because we didn't think of it. The hazard of wood dust is very real and can be quite toxic. In tiny amounts, we can tolerate it but a continuous dose, and the medical bills add up.

As early as possible in your foray into the world of wood working, especially with modern machines, install air cleaning (first) and dust collection (not quite second.) Consider buying clean air before you buy the tool that fouls it up.

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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-17-2010, 10:42 AM
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OR

You can just open the garage door and let the dust out or just roll your router table outside on the drive way and do the job outside, after all that's why you put the wheels on the router cabinet, many go over the deep end with getting all the dust and it's so simple now if you have 20,000 sq.ft. shop you need the high end stuff but most don't..

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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-29-2011, 12:37 PM
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Default dust control a start

I made a air cleaner with 2 80CFM fans pulling thre air through a pretty good furnace filter and then blowing the filtered air thru 2 3" pipes to either end of the shop. I haven't gotten a cyclone for the shop vac opt to just have to empty it frequently and wash the filter bags regularly. Just wondering about methods for collecting the dust from the table before it gets into the air or on the floor.




Quote:
Originally Posted by allthunbs View Post
You bring up two issues, dust collection and air cleaning. There are a variety of answers to both requirements. For those people starting out, the shop vacuum with a cyclone lid (of some sort) for dust collection is adequate. The links above address that option.

The air cleaning is a separate issue. You can buy fine filter air cleaners but they all work the same way: air being blown around and sucked through a filter. I accomplish this with a 20" box fan (garage sale special) and a 20" furnace filter taped to the intake side of the fan. You can get these filters down to 5 micron filtering. There are two objectives here, to reduce the bio hazard of working in wood dust and to eliminate spontaneous combustion from dust laden air.

I did an experiment once with dust and I can tell you it really explodes. Gave me a 20' high fireball per shovel full of sawdust thrown into a barrel from about 4' above the barrel.

When we're starting out, we often overlook safety simply because we didn't think of it. The hazard of wood dust is very real and can be quite toxic. In tiny amounts, we can tolerate it but a continuous dose, and the medical bills add up.

As early as possible in your foray into the world of wood working, especially with modern machines, install air cleaning (first) and dust collection (not quite second.) Consider buying clean air before you buy the tool that fouls it up.
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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-17-2011, 07:14 PM
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You need to read the references at the start of this thread. You will find that air cleaning and dust collection is not a luxury but a necessity. You will also find out that 5 microns is a large particle, and the particles finer than 5 microns are the most dangerous. Get both an air cleaner and cyclone dust collector and save your health.
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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-23-2011, 03:15 AM
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My dust control system has progressed from what it was a little over two years ago consisting of one Ridgid shop vac to what it is today, two Ridgid shop vacs, one Jet 1000B (1 micron air filter), one Jet 650 Dust collector (not yet in use full time), one HF 2hp 1500cfm dust collector retro fitted with the Wynn 35A Series Cartridge kit (filters to .5 micron) in series with and downstream from a Onida Super Dust Deputy fitted to a 35 gallon barrel to collect dust and chips from my TS, two planers and joiner. My router table, osculating sander, compound miter slider saw, band saw and anything else are handled by the two shop vacs. All but the Jet filter and the shop vacs are located in an adjacent garage. My shop is located in a walkout basement and occupies about 435 sqft plus the garage where I store most of my wood and my Jeep. For now all the ducts lie on the floor and will be raised to the ceiling or at least part way up the wall. I would be open to suggestion as to what material to use for duct work and how high to move it up the wall or to the ceiling.

Pic 1 My DC system in the garage, HF 1500 dust collector with the Wynn 35A series cartridge kit and the Onida Dust Deputy at the far left.
Pic 2 the Jet 1000B It my opinion that a good air filter system should be a top priority item. You can have shop vacs and a big DC unit but the fine and hazardous particles are still in the air. When sanding I often wear my 3M mask.
Pic 3 The trusty shop vac.
Pics 4-7 the present duct system, this will change.

The reason there is anything in the bag on the HF 1500 is I didn't empty the blue barrel soon enough on two occasions. Prior to that there was just a skiff of dust in the bag.

It interesting to note that the garage has almost no dust from the DC system collecting anywhere. I do not want dust in the house from the shop so much so that we just spent a sizable amount of money to air condition and heat the shop and the rest of the basement keeping that area isolated from the rest of the house and each room separate from each other.

Pics 8&9 the A/C heat unit in the shop.
Pics 10&11 the outside condenser unit
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Wisdom: Where experience and knowledge combine and become one.

"We are all one decision away from Stupid!!"

Lamentations 3:22-23

"How often we sacrifice the permanent plans of God on the altar of immediate solutions"

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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-23-2011, 09:03 AM
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I do agree with Ron and Jerry. I have as Jerry does a HF dust collector with a Wynn 35A filter in series with a cyclone lidded container. I have drops to my lathe, bandsaw, router table, jointer, planer and tablesaw all controlled with blast gates. I have a Delta DC on my Jet lathe. I also have a Penn State Industries air cleaner. Along with this I wear a Airstream AS 400 respirator with a HEPA filter which goes on when I enter the shop and doesn't come off till I leave the shop. Merrill is absolutely right in that it is the dust particles less than 5 micron that are dangerous when taken in your lungs. I have a 12 X 24 shop with no garage door or window to open. I go thru my clock shop to get to my wood shop which are in the same building. I don't want dust to get into there. I do some flat work but mostly turning which involves a lot of sanding and that means a lot of fine dust. After my third bout with bronchitis and my Doctor telling me it could lead to emphysema I took notice. My grandfather died from it and it wasn't a pleasant way to go. So is it overkill or over the top? To some I guess that answer is "yes" but I can say I have not had any problems since adding the above plus my shop is a lot more dust free.

Ron thanks for posting the info. For those new to woodworking or woodturning it is important info and glad Mark is going to make a sticky of this info.

Bernie W.

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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 10-23-2011, 12:40 PM
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Bernie how have you run your duct work and what material did you use? I too have blast gates at each drop and it can be a little inconvenient but I will live with it for now.

Ron I did not properly thank you for helping me see the hazards with the dust exposure. I wish I had the $$$ to add what ever is needed to complete my system. My safety equipment is the one best investment in my shop.

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