gloves in the woodshop?? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 04:39 PM Thread Starter
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Default gloves in the woodshop??

i work in the oil field. we deal the big oil and the indy's alike. it is becoming common place for these companys, both large and small alike, to require specific gloves for everything. some companys worse than others. fox eample if you are if are taking notes or just standing around you must wear light mechanics type gloves. if you are running tools or handling cutting devices you must wear a glove with a certified cuting rating of atleast 5. considering i must abide by these policies 60+ hours a week i have subconsciously adopted these policies in my shop. not for everything but for most. it is truly a rare occasion that i am in my shop without some sort of glove on. do any of you fellas wear gloves on the woodshop or am i alone on this one?
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post #2 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 04:56 PM
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Don't wear gloves all of the time but I do occasionally use well fitting "rubber" palmed cotton gloves for a better grip on stock while feeding through a machine.

I'm not too keen on wearing bulky gloves, they might get hung up on some moving parts.
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post #3 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 05:16 PM
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Hi Steven,
Gloves in a woodshop not a good idea for most machinery especially around a drill press or the lathe. I have a friend that was wearing gloves using the tablesaw & the glove touched the blade, pulled his hand in & he lost part of 2 fingers. It happens too quick to react. I used to sometimes wear gloves for rough cuts on the table saw when it is cold. Now since his accident I have stopped that practice. I would rather pull splinters & not stitches. Some machines you can get away with it such as a planer or drum sander. The moving parts are inside the machine. Just remember if you ever feel unsure about something maybe you shouldn't do it.

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post #4 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 05:38 PM
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Only when using stains or some chemicals. NEVER around the saws, jointers, and definitely not around the drill press.
A strong second to James' comments. Especially, the last sentence.

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post #5 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 05:53 PM
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Always when handling raw wood especially when transporting from one area to another. I use fingerless when working on the RT,Tblsaw,Shaper,Planer and bandsaw as I like to have that dexterity in my fingertips for touch,But yes to wearing them in the shop,by all means they have saved many a splintered palm and finger on more than 1 occasion
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post #6 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 07:40 PM
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As Tommy says, there are gloves and there are gloves. On installations these days everyone requires us to wear gloves. They are a royal PITA. I consider normal gloves to be dangerous for woodworking; they restrict manual dexterity, they inhibit the sense of touch and glove fingers can get caught up in machinery, blades and even screws (on any metal swarfs). The solution I've found is to use lightweight fingerless gloves with a thin (artificial) leather palm like these which leave me with most of the mobility I need whilst offering good palm and lower finger protection - very necessary when handling sharp stuff like laminated sheet or melamine-faced sheets. I've reduced splinter and slice/cut injuries greatly since I took to using them a couple of years back and now wear them for 7 to 10 hours a day. Only downside is that I wear out 4 to 5 pairs a year, oh and because I have large hands they take several minutes to take off.

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post #7 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
As Tommy says, there are gloves and there are gloves. On installations these days everyone requires us to wear gloves. They are a royal PITA. I consider normal gloves to be dangerous for woodworking; they restrict manual dexterity, they inhibit the sense of touch and glove fingers can get caught up in machinery, blades and even screws (on any metal swarfs). The solution I've found is to use lightweight fingerless gloves with a thin (artificial) leather palm like these which leave me with most of the mobility I need whilst offering good palm and lower finger protection - very necessary when handling sharp stuff like laminated sheet or melamine-faced sheets. I've reduced splinter and slice/cut injuries greatly since I took to using them a couple of years back and now wear them for 7 to 10 hours a day. Only downside is that I wear out 4 to 5 pairs a year, oh and because I have large hands they take several minutes to take off.

Regards

Phil
Maybe golf or sailing gloves could do the trick. (fingerless with leather palms).

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post #8 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 09:55 PM
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Only when using stains or some chemicals. NEVER around the saws, jointers, and definitely not around the drill press.
A strong second to James' comments. Especially, the last sentence.
I agree totally.

Latex gloves for stains.

Lucky that it does not get cold enough to need gloves in my "outdoor" shop.

I saw a person on Youtube using gloves on the router table and was waiting for an accident...

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post #9 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 10:32 PM
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Same as most of the above. I use gloves when planing rough lumber. Usually the gloves that prevent slivers are also slippery on wood, so never when pushing wood past exposed blades and bits.
The very first job I had after high school was feeding tree limbs into a mobile chipper. We were forbidden to wear gloves. There had been incidents of guys getting a limb started and then having a stub from a broken branch hook the gauntlet on the glove and dragging their arm into the chipper head. Not wearing gloves was a little hard on the hands, but much better than losing an arm.
Blanket safety policies are meant to replace common sense and that isn't the way to go. Every situation should be assessed for its own hazards.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.

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post #10 of 56 (permalink) Old 06-21-2011, 10:47 PM
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I fully understand how the companies are going overboard on gloves... and long sleeves all the time. It has been hard to convince some that they are more dangerous than not is some instances. Personally, I don't wear my wedding ring at work as I have had that get snagged once on a piece of expanded metal I was handling. I also only wear a plastic/rubber watch band for a similar reason, and even that left a little scar.

Even though our hands aren't supposed to be anywhere close to the danger zone on our power tools, I personally would not wear gloves in close proximity to rotating machinery. I have knowledge of more than one instance where the user probably would have fared better without them, one involved a young man on a stationary wire wheel (loss of 2.5 fingers) and another experienced individual broke his arm on a lathe. On another note, I had a cup brush mouted in a 4 inch angle grinder catch the loose edge of an un-tucked in shirt and sucked it in... just a scare but it was amazing how fast it happened. Loose clothing can be a big hazarrd as well.

I do have a pair of light mechanics gloves that I use for unloading/moving stock, or for when it's real cold outside, but they come off when I'm using the stationary tools.

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