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-   -   How Does Soap Clean Hands? (https://www.routerforums.com/shop-safety/44287-how-does-soap-clean-hands.html)

jessicaneger78 12-13-2013 02:50 PM

How Does Soap Clean Hands?
 
Soap is a very useful substance that allows us to more effectively clean our hands. To understand how soap cleans our hands, you must first understand the chemistry behind water, dirt and grease. Water is a polar molecule. This means that water molecules (hydrogen and 2 oxygen) tend to separate into positive and negative ends. Now some substances, such as dirt and salt, are water soluble. This means they are able to easily dissolve in water, because their molecules have either positively or negatively charged parts (ions) that are attracted to the charges of the polar water molecules (they are hydrophilic). This allows them to become separated in the water and dissolve. Other substances, such as grease and oil, are not water soluble. This means they are not able to dissolve in water because their molecules do not contain positive and negative parts (ions), and so they are not attracted to the water molecules (they are hydrophobic). This means they do not become separated when they come in contact with water, and so they are not able to dissolve in water.

Chemistry of Soap

Soap is able to solve the problem of grease and oil's not being water soluble. This is because of the chemical composition of soap. Soap has an ionic head and a non-polar tail. This means that the head of a soap molecule is attracted to water, and the tail is attracted to oil and grease. So when soap comes in contact with an oil, it connects the oil to the water and allows it to be washed off. Other water-soluble dirt on your hands can be washed off with only water, as mentioned above. Also, soap is able to decrease water's high surface tension, which is caused by the many hydrogen bonds that hold water together. When soap is used, water's surface tension is reduced; therefore, the water is able to spread out more, because it is not being held together as tightly by the hydrogen bonds. This allows the water to more effectively dissolve the dirt and oil on your hands.

denniswoody 12-13-2013 06:28 PM

I'm not sure what prompted this post but it was very informative. Thanks! How about a follow-up on soap and germs/bacteria. Question, if I handle chicken do I need soap or is water enough to clean my hands?

Knothead47 12-13-2013 08:02 PM

Interesting.

Knot working 12-14-2013 06:12 AM

Yes that is interesting. All I know is it works.

OPG3 12-15-2013 05:25 PM

Jessica(?) Welcome to the Router Forums!

Very informative! Thanks for sharing. Now, I have a serious question...My house is on a septic tank. Tubs, sinks, toilets and showers all go to the septic tank - which is typical in my area, except for cases where a sanitary sewer system is in use. The "items" in the septic tank are referred to as effluent (liquid) and solids. Bacteria break-down these "items" until they enter the drain field where they go into the soil. Eventually this becomes ground water.
Question: When SOAP is designated as ANTI-BACTERIAL, how does that affect the septic system? Am I killing the very bacteria that my system depends on?

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia

zm15 12-16-2013 08:16 PM

Super interesting! Now, how exactly does the wonderful Orange Goop work so well? :)

papasombre 12-27-2013 11:16 AM

Hi, Jessica.

Welcome to the forum.

Very interesting topic. Besides the hygiene I use the leftover pieces of soap to lubricate the screws when I am doing woodworking

Jerry Bowen 12-27-2013 08:33 PM

Johnny wonders why it worked so well for cleaning profanity from his mouth when his mother used it when he was a little boy.

Bricknhank 12-28-2013 04:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jessicaneger78 (Post 363085)
Soap is a very useful substance that allows us to more effectively clean our hands. To understand how soap cleans our hands, you must first understand the chemistry behind water, dirt and grease. Water is a polar molecule. This means that water molecules (hydrogen and 2 oxygen) tend to separate into positive and negative ends. Now some substances, such as dirt and salt, are water soluble. This means they are able to easily dissolve in water, because their molecules have either positively or negatively charged parts (ions) that are attracted to the charges of the polar water molecules (they are hydrophilic). This allows them to become separated in the water and dissolve. Other substances, such as grease and oil, are not water soluble. This means they are not able to dissolve in water because their molecules do not contain positive and negative parts (ions), and so they are not attracted to the water molecules (they are hydrophobic). This means they do not become separated when they come in contact with water, and so they are not able to dissolve in water.

Chemistry of Soap

Soap is able to solve the problem of grease and oil's not being water soluble. This is because of the chemical composition of soap. Soap has an ionic head and a non-polar tail. This means that the head of a soap molecule is attracted to water, and the tail is attracted to oil and grease. So when soap comes in contact with an oil, it connects the oil to the water and allows it to be washed off. Other water-soluble dirt on your hands can be washed off with only water, as mentioned above. Also, soap is able to decrease water's high surface tension, which is caused by the many hydrogen bonds that hold water together. When soap is used, water's surface tension is reduced; therefore, the water is able to spread out more, because it is not being held together as tightly by the hydrogen bonds. This allows the water to more effectively dissolve the dirt and oil on your hands.

Hmmm. I'll bet my mom never used this analysis when she used to use soap to wash my mouth out when I was a kid!:lol:

elfridaauston87 07-01-2019 01:15 AM

Interesting post.


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