Porch railing - Router Forums
 20Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 12:46 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Larry
Posts: 41
 
Default Porch railing

I just finished making a new porch railing for my house. Material is Cypress. There are 4 sections about 49 spindles total. Each spindle has a 4 way dovetail on top and a 35mm tenon that is wedged on the bottom. There are no fasteners. Lumber was glued with resorcinol to make 3 1/2" blanks.
Not sure I did the picture thing correctly.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Porch rail.jpg
Views:	71
Size:	353.0 KB
ID:	370611  

Larry42 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 02:40 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Herb Stoops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Herb
Posts: 7,348
 
Default

Good job, did you mill the Spindles? That is nice, be proud.

HErb
Herb Stoops is offline  
post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 02:57 PM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,658
 
Default

Those are going to look great installed. Heck, they look great just sitting there. Did you turn each picket? Not sure what you mean by a 4 way dovetail, maybe a couple of closeups? Sounds complicated, but I can think of ways to make that fairly easy using glued on pieces to trap each spindle joint. Glad we have all these new fangled glues to work with.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
DesertRatTom is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 03:13 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 14,870
 
Default

Is one dovetail a removable key?

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is online now  
post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 04:26 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 24,693
 
Default

sweet!!!

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is offline  
post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 04:29 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Larry
Posts: 41
 
Default

I didn't explain the 4 way dovetail very well. I took the square spindle blank and stood it on end in a crude jig. with a SawStop saw I cut a 15 degree cut about .7" deep into two adjacent sides. Then I went to our SCM slider that tilts to opposite way and cut the other two using the same jig. That allowed me to reference from the same surface so the resulting remainder was the same even if there were slight variations in the size of the blanks. The blanks were then laid on their sides and the fence was set to control depth. with the blade back to 90 degrees I cut away the 4 small pieces leaving a 4 way male dovetail. The sliding table works well for this type of operation. The bottom of the top rail was then dado cut and just using the saw blade set at 15 degrees the under cut for the female dovetail was cut on a 12/14" table saw with a power feed. A strip of wood was also cut at 15 degrees on the table saw along both edges. This would become the filler parts between the spindles. Stops were set on the Omga miter saw to cut the angles of 15 degrees on both ends of the filler pieces. These would lock the spindles between each other and establish the spacing. A little math was needed to make the 4 different panels come out looking the same in spite of each being a different length. So I had 4 different lengths of fillers. I worked in metric since it is so much easier to do such calculations in. The blanks were put on my hydraulic copy lathe, turned & sanded. A 35mm diameter stub tenon was turned on the bottom. I did several templates and test turnings. Templates were just cut from 1/4" Masonite on the band saw and sanded to final form on the Max oscillating spindle sander. The bottom rail was drilled at 35mm on the drill press. A 3/4" notch was cut into the bottom of the ends of the bottom rail that will fit over a short piece morticed into the existing porch columns. I cut 4 kerfs into the stub tenons on the bandsaw and made a stack of small wedges (200 pc!) to fit them. The top of each spindle was fit into the top rail and a spacer block put in place. After all were installed a very short filler was glued into the ends to lock them in. Then the bottom rail was fit over all the tenons and the wedges glued and driven home.

I had primed all the parts before assembly then spray painted them after. Now I have to remove the old railings and do a bit of patching of nail holes, prime and paint the columns. Then I'll mortice for the bottom stub that will locate the bottom rail and glue it in place. The top rail will have a piece of the spacer material let into it and then slid forward into a matching mortice in the columns. Assuming my measurements are correct this will allow me to set each section on to the bottom support and slide the dovetail piece in. A single SS screw from the bottom will retain that piece. There will be small support blocks under each end, fastened to the columns and in the middle of the long spans. There are a lot of assumptions made about being able to pull all the fits off.
As you can guess by this long winded explanation, it has taken me a lot of time. Crazy old woodworker.
Larry42 is offline  
post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 04:48 PM
Registered User
 
Nickp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Nick
Posts: 3,373
 
Default

VERY Nice...! ! !

Nick

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Points to Ponder...

LEARNING - the decision you make to know and
understand more about some thing.

TIME - the thing that gets in the way of learning.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Nickp is online now  
post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 06:55 PM
Registered User
 
OutoftheWoodwork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Barb
Posts: 2,193
 
Default

Niiiiiice!!!!

Barb


Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.
Henry A. Kissinger

If you choose to poke at a bee hive, be prepared to get stung.
OutoftheWoodwork is offline  
post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 07:42 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 3,809
 
Default

Looking good!!

HJ

Detroit Burbs

RoutervilleUSA on Etsy

I took the tests and retirement is the best job I'm suited for.

Now I know why old guys wear suspenders.
honesttjohn is online now  
post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-13-2019, 09:11 PM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,658
 
Default

I was thinking you could make a 15 degree cut on all 4 sides of the ends of each spindle.

On a piece cut to the width of the spindle, make 15 degree end cuts on multiple pieces, each the exact width of the spacing you want between spindles. Tack and glue in place between spindles.

Take long pieces of thin trim and make a 15 degree cut along one edge. Pin and glue along the length of the top and bottom rail to lock the pickets in place.

You'd need a jig to hold the pickets vertically with the ends against the bit. If there are differences in the sizes of the ends of spindle, you'd need to do some sanding or hand plane work, or find a single source all the same size.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
DesertRatTom is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome