Ken gets his spot... - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 08:55 AM
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Looking great Barbie, however I reckon that I'd need a ladder to work on what appears to be a very high bench!
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post #12 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 08:56 AM
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Nice space, that's for sure. My wife treated me to an electrician who tapped the main box, ran about 50 feet of condult underground, back to a 60 amp sub panel. He used an 8 ft copper rod driven into the ground for the ground, then 3 12 gauge wires from new breakers in the old box. That makes 3 20 amp circuits. If you can dig your own trench, you can lay in the wires yourself. Needs to have a riser at each enad going into the old box, and at the other end, into the sub panel. The sub panel has breakers, then wires run to three boxes with 20 amp GFCI plugs.

IN your case, the sub panel can go inside, and feed the circuits in your shop.

Cost was $1500, including an extra circuit through the attic that runs our swamp cooler.

If you dig the trench, run the conduit, pull the wires and install the box yourself, you could probably do the job pretty easily and keep costs down. Have the electrician hook things up.

Pulling the wires through the conduit through 3 major bends was surprisingly easy. The electrician used a lite length of twine with a wad of plastic wrap on one end. He inserted it on one end then used a vacuum to suck it through to the other end. Then he tied a heavier rope (what HD has so you can tie your load down) onto the string and pulled it through. He tied and taped the twine to the 3 wires and pulled the wires through as I fed then into the conduit on the other end. Done is jig time! I think you can do all that mechanical stuff yourself and only have the electrician hook up the wires to the new breakers. We used full sized breakers but you can get the thin ones that you can put two in the existing panel.

110 v is pretty simple to hook up. I always use 12 gauge wire, 2 conductors and a ground, better to overdo it than hope lighter weight stuff will work. The cable from the subpanel outlets into the sheds is flexible conduit. Works quite well, and is now covered over by a small deck. The cables in the flex conduit are from 10 gauge braided wire extension cords. Simple
way to get from the sub panel into the shed.

After having watched the electrician do all this (he had a small ditch witch) in about half a day, I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to do the basic wiring in a shop like yours. The only part of my installation that was a bear was cutting through some massive roots left over from a big Cotton Wood.

You can find a book on wiring at Home Depot. Then hire an electrician just to hook it up and give it his blessing. The sub panel installation here didn't even require a permit.

For lights and a power outlet on the same circuit, you can buy wire with an extra (red) conductor. The on/off switch goes on the red wire. It is nice to have a power outlet over the work spaces.

I am wondering where you're going to put the table saw?
Tom,

A couple of missing points here. Breakers are dependant on the breaker panel itself. Only certain breakers will work in the chosen panel so that should be decided before getting the panel. But most importantly is making sure a permit is pulled. The insurance company loves any excuse not to pay and your town/city/county may likely require it. Better to know for sure then get into trouble later. My locality requires a permit.

-Steve
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post #13 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 09:06 AM
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Coming along great.
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post #14 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 09:18 AM Thread Starter
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Looking great Barbie, however I reckon that I'd need a ladder to work on what appears to be a very high bench!
I thought the same thing, Harry, but standing at it, it's not that high; I'm roughly 5'8 or 9" and had no trouble standing at it to work. I also have a backless bar stool that Ken placed up against it, and it's at a comfortable height, if I wanted to sit at it to work/eat. (Just in case my project goes into suppertime )
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post #15 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 10:43 AM
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Not sure if I'm gonna get one, Tom. They scare me. If I find one that doesn't scare me (last one I had rattled so bad I wouldn't touch it, so Ken sold it.) I'm sure I'll find a place.
Definitely do not want one that rattles. But scaring you is good. That means you are going to be careful. It's when a saw does not scare the user that fingers start getting lost. Mine still scares me.

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I am currently unsupervised. I know, it freaks me out too. But the possibilities are endless!
Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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post #16 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 03:28 PM
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To commemorate your new shop, here’s the best song I could come up with Barb.
Btw, it used to be my ring tone lol

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I donít always insulate , but when I do .

Ok , I never insulate
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post #17 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 03:36 PM Thread Starter
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To commemorate your new shop, hereís the best song I could come up with Barb.
Btw, it used to be my ring tone lol

https://youtu.be/ZyhrYis509A
*FACE PALM*
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post #18 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 03:57 PM
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Hentie:

Those are vents to prevent the airflow from being restricted from the soffits to the ridge vent in the roof. The insulation (in our case, the pink foam at the other end of the picture) is cut to fit snugly and pressed in just enough to be flush with the frame of the rafters.
Barb, I'm guessing the plan is that the attic will never be closed off from the level below. This application would never work otherwise. Normally, in a house for example, the foam protector would just be from the outer wall up to about 3 feet in order to circulate in the attic and flow out through the ridge vents. Here, and I presume in Michigan, most homeowners have extra insulation blown in atop the existing batts to increase the "R" value. My house, built in '76 had the standard 3 1/2 batt giving R12 but when I moved in I installed the foam then added another 15" of batts, crossing the plies from layer to layer to avoid leaking.
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post #19 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 06:37 PM
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Tom,

A couple of missing points here. Breakers are dependant on the breaker panel itself. Only certain breakers will work in the chosen panel so that should be decided before getting the panel. But most importantly is making sure a permit is pulled. The insurance company loves any excuse not to pay and your town/city/county may likely require it. Better to know for sure then get into trouble later. My locality requires a permit.

-Steve
Good info. My town didn't require a permit. Easy to check on that, but I don't think you'd need it to do most of the prep work, trenching laying the pvc, pulling the wire even. Interior wiring just has to be done according to code, which I know how to do, but I take photos of every connection and use one gauge heavier wire than required.
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post #20 of 37 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 07:01 PM Thread Starter
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@thomas1389 This is my garage, so there's no attic. A loft, maybe. That extra space is gonna be used to store things. And it would work; you place your drywall (or plywood, or OSB) over top of the 2x4 rafters for a finished look. I need to close off the soffits without constricting the air flow, that prevents mold and mildew in the roof area. I went to my structural foreman and asked how I was supposed to keep warm this winter, if there's cold air coming in from under the roof (through the soffits.) He told me to put in the vents between the rafters, put in the foam, drywall over it, and paint it white. Then I can "close off" the bottom of the truss (I don't know the technical term for the bottom piece of the truss) and keep the airflow to the roof vent; in turn, preventing any mold or mildew from being formed from trapped moisture from lack of circulation.
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Barb


Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.
Henry A. Kissinger

If you choose to poke at a bee hive, be prepared to get stung.

Last edited by OutoftheWoodwork; 06-24-2019 at 07:14 PM.
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