Well, It's Standing... - Page 3 - Router Forums
 62Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 09:08 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
OutoftheWoodwork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Barb
Posts: 2,643
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TenGees View Post
Barb, I always use a disc sander to sand my fingers.

Nice work on the display shelf. I was surprised that you got it done so soon - seems like you just asked for tips on construction and you're already done.
Thank you. It was a necessity I wanted out of the way, so I can get back to the signs and other novelties. I built a second one today, (minus any layers of skin being removed from any other fingers, thankfully.) Both have been sanded, one got the wood conditioner on it, with the other one getting it's conditioner soon as I can get back out there. Hopefully before the weekend.

Ken helped me get the displays sanded, and helped me get the eye glass stands I cut sanded as well. I still have to get the bases cut for six (6) of them, but the worst is over. I still have the tablet/phone stands to cut, a couple novelty critters, and a couple useful gadgets, as well. So much to do in a month! I'm already planning on taking a long weekend in the next week or so.
TenGees likes this.

Barb


Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.
Henry A. Kissinger

If you choose to poke at a bee hive, be prepared to get stung.
OutoftheWoodwork is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 09:09 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Country: United States
First Name: Joe
Posts: 78
 
Default

I was wondering how long it would take someone to notice it isn't Baltic Birch. Even BB's lowest grade has solid patches with no voids! It is a nice design though! Keep up the nice work and get special blades with opposing teeth to eliminate or reduce jigsaw cutting.

"The road from Splinterville starts at the blade
Choose the right tooth count for the cuts you make. Blades with aggressive 6-tooth-per-inch (tpi) designs work great for sawing construction lumber, but cut too coarsely for woodworking project parts. Instead, select a 10- to 12-tpi blade for larger, gradual curves, or a 20-tpi blade for tight curves (1" radius or less) in solid wood and all cuts in plywood or melamine-coated particleboard.

Beyond tooth count, also consider the blade design. For decades, jigsaw-blade teeth were "set," alternately leaning left and right, as shown in chart. This makes them cut coolly and quickly, but at the expense of cut quality.

To remedy this, several manufacturers now make blades with ground, inline teeth, as shown chart, that slice the wood like a surgical scalpel rather than bluntly tear at it. This produces much cleaner cuts. For this reason, in the WOODŽ magazine shop we use Bosch Clean-For-Wood and Xtra-Clean-For-Wood blades. Just be aware that these blades can burn your wood if you set the jigsaw's speed too fast or feed the saw through the wood too slowly. Our best advice: Practice on scrap of the same species to find the best combination of speed and feed rate.

Finally, remember that jigsaw blades cost a fraction of the material you're cutting. So know when to call it quits on a blade. If a blade begins to burn the wood or tear out surface fibers where it didn't used to, or if it requires greater effort to push through a cut, chuck it and get a new one."
graeme.c.payne likes this.
tacomamactech is offline  
post #23 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 09:19 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
OutoftheWoodwork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Barb
Posts: 2,643
 
Default

@DesertRatTom Yeah I called Mike yesterday, when I was ready to burn it all. We had a chat as to what I had to work with, and came up with the spiral blade on my router, which saved my butt.

As for the band saw, yeah, mine did too, but it wasn't bolted. Ken has made multiple comments about getting me a band saw. I'm gonna see what I can find out there. I don't want a plastic one.
DesertRatTom likes this.

Barb


Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.
Henry A. Kissinger

If you choose to poke at a bee hive, be prepared to get stung.
OutoftheWoodwork is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 09:26 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
OutoftheWoodwork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Barb
Posts: 2,643
 
Default

@tacomamactech I know a little about blades; I know how to choose, use, and when to change them, as well. I have a great deal of them, in all different sizes, uses, etc.

As for the design, again, I can't take credit for it, but thank you. I found it when I went looking on line for a tabletop display stand. Only problem was, there were no plans for them, only people selling them for an exuberant amount of money on Etsy.

Barb


Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full.
Henry A. Kissinger

If you choose to poke at a bee hive, be prepared to get stung.
OutoftheWoodwork is offline  
post #25 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 11:08 PM
Retired Moderator
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 16,385
 
Default

I learned the hard way that belt sanders can bite too. I heard of a trick to find splinters years ago but I don`t think I`ve ever tried it. I usually just start excavating until I know it`s gone. The trick was to put iodine on the skin where it is and let it sit there for a minute and then wipe off. It may stain the splinter so you can see it.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #26 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 11:41 PM
Official Greeter
 
jw2170's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: Australia
First Name: James
Posts: 18,674
 
Send a message via Skype™ to jw2170
Default

Another success story, Barb.

Have fun at the fair...

James
Sydney, Australia
.

I don't mind if other members disagree with my comments.
I don't profess to know everything, and I may learn something new.

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity."




jw2170 is offline  
post #27 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-04-2019, 08:13 AM
Registered User
 
TenGees's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Country: Canada
First Name: Paul
Posts: 1,811
 
Default

Wood slivers will usually fester which helps finding and getting them out. After working in a neon shop, I found that wood slivers aren't too bad. Glass ones are the worst... they don't fester, next to impossible to see and you tend to develop callous around them!

Sent from my Hallicrafters S-40 using morse code.
TenGees is offline  
post #28 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-04-2019, 08:28 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 4,333
 
Default

My grandmother used to make a paste of Fels Naptha soap and brown suger. Would draw them up to be tweezed out.

HJ

Detroit Burbs

RoutervilleUSA on Etsy

I took the tests and retirement is the best job I'm suited for.

Now I know why old guys wear suspenders.
honesttjohn is online now  
post #29 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-04-2019, 12:21 PM
Registered User
 
David Bradford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Country: United States
First Name: David
Posts: 163
 
Default

Looks good.
OutoftheWoodwork likes this.


David drafter @ Linear Fine Woodworking in Phoenix
[email protected]
http://www.linearfinewoodworking.com
David Bradford is offline  
post #30 of 48 (permalink) Old 11-04-2019, 12:48 PM
Registered User
 
JFPNCM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Jon
Posts: 4,303
 
Default

Steel slivers from handling/cutting cables are tough as well.

Jon
JFPNCM is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome