It ain’t perfect, but... - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-06-2020, 09:07 PM
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The ‘customer’ was especially taken by them but to me they were a design nuisance. Here’s why - anything off a 90-degree cut widens that mitered surface’s width, so each of those 45-degree radius cuts added half again as much material to mate up as a simple square corner would have. Lining up the interior surfaces left a good 1/16” of material sticking past the joint - I just crudely shaved it off with a chisel and rounded them off with 80 grit until I could go to a lower grade of sandpaper. With all the other warts to try and conceal, this was the worst one. Thankfully, they will love this freebie and never complain but I’m wondering how to do it correctly - if there is a way. The upcoming Tea Box Won’t have any radius corners!
I like the radiuses look rather than a boxy square look. To eliminate the one angle longer than the other on the corners ,you will have to bisect the angle.
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post #12 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-06-2020, 09:17 PM
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Well done. That would make a great choice for a picnic or patio table as well.

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post #13 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-06-2020, 09:34 PM Thread Starter
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I like the radiuses look rather than a boxy square look. To eliminate the one angle longer than the other on the corners ,you will have to bisect the angle.
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Can you offer a more detailed explanation, Herb? I think I understand but seriously doubt it! More pieces and smaller angles? (A drawing would be helpful...)

Common Man Woodworking
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post #14 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-06-2020, 10:12 PM
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Here is a video. You have a end board meeting the side board at 45°so the inside angle is 135°. Half of that is 67.5°. This is very important to know because you are going to be running into situations all the time where you have to miter a corner that is not at 90°. This is especially true if you ever have to run trim as in a house. Most corners are not 90° and you have to make a good fit.
Also you can stand the boards together at the angle you want then draw a line between the inside angle and the outside angle with out ever knowing the actual angle is in degrees.


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post #15 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-06-2020, 11:08 PM
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Very nice.

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post #16 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-07-2020, 12:44 AM
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I believe Herb's talking about these intersections...
He's suggesting that for a perfect fit on both the inner and outer planes, the matching pieces need to have identical miters, whatever the actual total angle is.
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post #17 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-07-2020, 02:23 AM
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I like it. Has kind of a 30s moderne look to it. Only thing I'd add would be some short feet so it stands above instead of in sister Susie's spilled sauce. Reminds me of something out of my way back memory bank. Some good advice on construction. Getting miters right is such a challenge

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post #18 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-07-2020, 07:18 AM
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Very nice Brian
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post #19 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-07-2020, 07:46 AM
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Great design Brian. Working with 1/4" wood must be a challenge, one I haven't tried yet but I do have some boxes to make so 1/4", 3/8", and maybe 1/2" will be likely used. I had to look hard at what Herb was referring to and then I remembered my experience with an 8 sided piece I made long ago. Finding the exact angle versus what I ended up with was just slightly off. When it comes to projects I've done many over the years and a few based on Norm Abram's designs such as a few bookcases and then an entertainment center based on that bookcase design. In almost every project I can think of there is a flaw/design change that I almost always see first when I look at them because I know where to look. Others who have seen the piece many times never noticed but I'm drawn to that each time.

Each design change/flaw has been a teaching moment and I am still learning evidently......but I seldom repeat the same mistake as I have many more yet to discover. While your table hutch may not be perfect it is highly functional and the next likely will be even better. Just to mention what Tom said adding some small feet would be helpful I think.
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post #20 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-07-2020, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Bstrom View Post
Can you offer a more detailed explanation, Herb? I think I understand but seriously doubt it! More pieces and smaller angles? (A drawing would be helpful...)
Maybe this will help.
When you make a normal 90-degree miter, you cut the pieces at 45 degrees (half of 90).
For this application, you are making angles of 45 degrees, so the cuts would be 22.5 degrees (half of 45).
That will make the mating pieces the same thickness.
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