Stucco Planter - Router Forums
 43Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-02-2020, 02:34 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
First Name: Tony
Posts: 325
 
Default Stucco Planter

well I recently had my house covered in Acrylic rubberized stucco, there was some left over so I attempted to make a stucco planter.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20200802_144454.jpg
Views:	25
Size:	1.25 MB
ID:	391009  

Click image for larger version

Name:	20200802_144446.jpg
Views:	25
Size:	1.27 MB
ID:	391011  

comp56 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-02-2020, 09:39 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Herb Stoops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Herb
Posts: 8,942
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by comp56 View Post
well I recently had my house covered in Acrylic rubberized stucco, there was some left over so I attempted to make a stucco planter.
Is that the product that you install styrofoam sheets and then trowel on a layer some kind of material,then spray on the thick rubbized top coat?
Herb
JFPNCM likes this.
Herb Stoops is online now  
post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-02-2020, 10:17 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
First Name: Tony
Posts: 325
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Stoops View Post
Is that the product that you install styrofoam sheets and then trowel on a layer some kind of material,then spray on the thick rubbized top coat?
Herb
it can be, when they did my house they put a skim coat on of a concrete base because I had already had a concrete base but I had changed all the windows and of course none were original size. then they applied the stucco entirely by trowel. here are some before and after.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20190702_145057.jpg
Views:	18
Size:	1.29 MB
ID:	391045  

comp56 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-03-2020, 01:33 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Herb Stoops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Herb
Posts: 8,942
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by comp56 View Post
it can be, when they did my house they put a skim coat on of a concrete base because I had already had a concrete base but I had changed all the windows and of course none were original size. then they applied the stucco entirely by trowel. here are some before and after.
That is the regular old cement stucco. The new "Stucco" on commercial building they put 3 1/2" styrofoam on and the trowel on a subbase then spray on a finish coat.

HErb
Herb Stoops is online now  
post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-03-2020, 04:00 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
First Name: Tony
Posts: 325
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Stoops View Post
That is the regular old cement stucco. The new "Stucco" on commercial building they put 3 1/2" styrofoam on and the trowel on a subbase then spray on a finish coat.

HErb
this is premixed colour based fine float acrylic stucco and not cementitious stucco which is the old style. it can be applied both ways either spray or by float.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20200610_170452.jpg
Views:	6
Size:	949.3 KB
ID:	391055  

DaninVan, MEBCWD and Herb Stoops like this.

Last edited by comp56; 08-03-2020 at 04:09 AM.
comp56 is offline  
post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-03-2020, 11:07 AM
Retired Moderator
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 16,385
 
Default

I've never heard of the rubberized stucco. I tried finding it on some of our websites and I came up empty so far. I have a job it would be perfect for.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-03-2020, 02:50 PM
Registered User
 
mimac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Country: Canada
First Name: Brian
Posts: 513
 
Default

Chuck it is just acrylic stucco or EIFS. It was invented in Germany after the war as a quick alternative to regular stucco. Dryvit was the first iteration of it I think. It was first used in Canada around 1956. I worked on the first building to use it in Victoria in 1974 an 18 story hi-rise in James Bay. It has certain elastomeric properties and usually goes over a styro-foam sub strata but can go over a well floated cement coat.
mimac is offline  
post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-03-2020, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
First Name: Tony
Posts: 325
 
Default

ya maybe rubberized isn't the right word to discribe it but it does have flexing properties versus cracking like the old stuff did.
Herb Stoops likes this.
comp56 is offline  
post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-03-2020, 05:56 PM
Retired Moderator
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 16,385
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mimac View Post
Chuck it is just acrylic stucco or EIFS. It was invented in Germany after the war as a quick alternative to regular stucco. Dryvit was the first iteration of it I think. It was first used in Canada around 1956. I worked on the first building to use it in Victoria in 1974 an 18 story hi-rise in James Bay. It has certain elastomeric properties and usually goes over a styro-foam sub strata but can go over a well floated cement coat.
Can it go directly onto wood Brian? I built part of my house on top of a PWF foundation. I've been trying to think of what I can use to finish the small section between the ground and the bottom of the siding. I was thinking regular stucco but I think the elastomeric would be better.
Herb Stoops likes this.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 08-03-2020, 08:54 PM
Registered User
 
mimac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Country: Canada
First Name: Brian
Posts: 513
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
Can it go directly onto wood Brian? I built part of my house on top of a PWF foundation. I've been trying to think of what I can use to finish the small section between the ground and the bottom of the siding. I was thinking regular stucco but I think the elastomeric would be better.
Yes it can Chuck in a sort of round about way. It is really made for the foam board base which is not like regular styrofoam. It is cooked somehow so that it does not expand and contract with temperature changes. The foam is stuck on with acrylic base coat using a largely notched trowel and reinforced with heavy fiberglass mesh over which the acrylic base coat is spread (sand and acrylic liquid to which you add portland cement). Spreading it takes practice. It is put on tight and as flat as possible as the finish coat goes on very thin and doesn't hide blemishes.
Having said all that I have used it several times over a wood substrata but only for myself and one friend. The first time I used it was over OSB in an unheated storage room interior. I cut wide strips of fibreglass mesh and basically taped the joints and spotted the screw holes just like dry walling. Then I spread the finish coat over top It has to go on tight, think keeping the trowel at a 30-40 degree angle more or less scraping it on. The finish is like spreading thick paint with sand in it. To bed the mesh I just used tile thin set. That finish lasted over 20 years until I converted the room to another use. The next time I did that it was on a friends garden shed over plywood. Basically used the same procedure and it still looks good 12 years later. Last time I did it was for my new garden shed 3 years ago. This was on OSB again using thin set as a base. This time I completely skimmed the shed with base after the taping. I did this myself keeping my eye on the sun and working fast. The finish skins over very quickly. You must keep a wet edge in order to be able to float it. On a stucco job the gut troweling is just about a foot or two in front of the guy floating.
The first picture shows the front with the base skim, the second with the finish all on. I bust it up with Tudor boards to make it manageable for one guy.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20170901_090804.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	1,017.8 KB
ID:	391087  

Click image for larger version

Name:	20170913_072828.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	1.12 MB
ID:	391089  

mimac is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome