Cutting boards/serving trays - Router Forums
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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-02-2018, 12:17 PM Thread Starter
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Default Cutting boards/serving trays

Hi all. I am about to take the plunge and start working on a project. I am hoping to get some guidance on making a cutting board/serving tray. Im thinking if i can make these, i will be able to fishish them with some pyrography artwork in one of the corners/edges to give it a real original look and blend a handmade piece of a cutting board with some creative art. I have been reading through a lot of helpful posts here on the forum that have helped me get some info on what I want to do but i have a few questions before I proceed.

All of my current tools are from my grandfathers old collection. I have a table belt and disc sander, random orbital sander, circular saw, and a variety of hand tools. What is the 1 power tool that i would most need for this type of project?

Table saw? Can i get by with just my circular saw?

Planer? Is this just nice to have or will this be necessary?

Both? I have a small budhet to add one of these if necessary. But was hoping to work with what i have as much as possible to learn beofre spending money on more tools.

Also, where does eveeyone source their woods? Is there a good online store or do most people find somewhere local. Im in New Hampshire so i dont think it should be too difficlut to find someone local but i wasnt sure if there was a perferred online shop.

Thanks in advance.

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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-02-2018, 12:28 PM
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Hi Micheal,
Once you start making cutting boards you will get addicted to it.

I would say both a TS and a jointer. If you are going to glue up strips ,you need tight joints.

Lots of clamps.

A good way to sand them flat, belt sander,or drum sander.

Get your wood locally.

You can take all the strips of scrap from the TS and make trays out of them too. Just glue them back together,mix and match, and make a new board out of them.

Herb
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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-02-2018, 12:37 PM
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need a jointer???

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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-02-2018, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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I do not have a jointer.

Would you suggest buying a jointer before a planer?

Knowing the project i have in mind.

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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-02-2018, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by forbes617 View Post
I do not have a jointer.

Would you suggest buying a jointer before a planer?

Knowing the project i have in mind.

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You can get a "Glue Line" blade for the TS and get glueable joints most of the time, or use a hand plane to joint the boards. The main thing is to have tight joints in glue-up cutting boards. If you are doing big slab ones like the pizza paddles, then thats a different story.

If you can afford a planer, then you could rip them on the TS and run them through the planer on edge .

On end grain boards, I preferred a drum sander to a planer for dressing them down after glue-up. I see on the forum several woodworkers are making them using a planer to plane the end grain. Extra caution must be used when doing this, light cuts, and surrounding them with a sacrificial board to eliminate the tear out as the cutters exit the board on the edges.

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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-02-2018, 03:39 PM
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Just my opinion but I'd buy a 'lunch box' planer before a jointer. You can joint with a hand plane, TS, or router table.
But absolutely you need to get perfect mating joint faces.
If you're not doing endgrain cutting boards (ie you want to run the grain lengthwise) a planer will give you dead flat finished faces on the glued up panels. You will need to be careful and make sure all the grains are running in the same direction. If they aren't, most likely the grains going the wrong way will lift; you won't be pleased.
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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-02-2018, 03:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Stoops View Post
Hi Michael,
Once you start making cutting boards you will get addicted to it.

Herb
I take exception to that, Herb. We've built over 50 and I can stop any time I want!

Hold that thought... headed to the shop to start another cutting board!

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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-02-2018, 05:51 PM
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I take exception to that, Herb. We've built over 50 and I can stop any time I want!

Hold that thought... headed to the shop to start another cutting board!

David
Yeah, David, I have gone through withdrawals,on that. Got addicted to making wooden locks too. When it is so much fun it is hard to stop.
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-03-2018, 09:09 AM
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The tools I consider essential in a work shop, in this order:
Table saw
Jointer
Planer
Router Table
Some people would substitute a bandsaw for the router table, it is probably a tie in my mind.
But here is the rub: There are work arounds that will accomplish the same thing for each of those tools. Those work arounds increase your skill, and will probably make you appreciate the tool your currently missing all the more, when you finally buy that tool. But in my experience people get frustrated and quit the hobby when they don't have the proper tool. That probably speaks more to our "gotta have it now" mind set, but never the less if you get frustrated by failure, it takes all of the fun out, and then you quit.
Long way of saying, buy the best table saw you can afford. Used if your handy and can do some repairs, new if your not, it is one of the few tools you can actually be better off buying used. With the table saw and correct blade and a couple of jigs, you can joint, resaw and dimension your wood. A decent hand plane or two will take care of the surfacing. Then make some stuff. As your skills improve so will your knowledge and then you can decide what you need next. One last thing, the biggest and most costly mistake I made starting out, was buying cheap and poor quality tools. I told myself I was saving money. The exact opposite was true, it costs more to replace a crappy tool than it does to "buy once, cry once". Good luck and have fun!
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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-03-2018, 10:24 AM
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As an alternative to gluing up your own boards and doing all the planing and sanding, you might want to look at some unfinished countertops. Home Depot, for example, sells unfinished maple countertops in various sizes. You could cut them to whatever size you need and skip the whole planing/standing/flattening step. It might even be easier to do end grain boards from them by cutting strips.
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