Router Bit/Saw Blade Wax Coating - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-14-2010, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Okay guys, here’s the deal. Since I started this thread, I ought to be able to say this w/o upsetting anyone.

First, I really do want to know where I can get some of the router bit wax goop I mentioned in my first posting. I’m hoping someone will come along & give me a lead. I can’t seem to find anything by googeling & I would like to have the real thing.


Second, we’ve gotten off topic. To my knowledge, there are no other shop tool as awkward to setup as are routers. Here’s why:


1st - Although there are minor exceptions, most routers will neither stand on their head nor lay peacefully on their side while they’re being setup. If you try to stand them on their heads to change bits, they fall over. If you try to do it with them laying on their side, they roll all over the bench or onto the floor. On most routers, the cords come out of the top making it impossible to stand set them up. Changing bits is a three-handed job in a two-handed world. This would be an easy fix if only router manufacturers would think before they start casting parts.

2nd - Another concern is the Porter Cable type template guides that have become standard on most routers. They’re almost impossible to securely lock in place. They’re designed to be hand tightened but when hand tightened, vibrate loose. The only option is to tighten them with Channel-Lock pliers which chews up the rings. Also, if the threads are tight (normal) there’s no way to hold the guide while the ring is being tightened so you can’t tighten them anyway unless you use another pair of pliers which destroys the guides. It would be so simple to design a system that uses a set screw to lock the collets in place, yet no one has gone there.

3rd - The small openings in the side of the router base are awkward to use, especially if you’ve misplaced the wrench or wrenches that came with the router (they seem always able to find a places to hide) and you need to use substitutes, such as crescent wrenches. Someone needs to design a base with a flip-up bottom that can be tilted out of the way for better access - not a difficult task I shouldn’t think.

All routers should have a shaft locking slide on the side of the router otherwise you need one hand to hold the router, another hand to push in a strongly springed shaft locking button and then, of course, your third hand to turn the router collet lock nut wrench. All this could be avoided by making the armature shaft a little larger, running a collet locking bolt up through the shaft that could be loosened or tightened from above. Simple enough but no one’s been there yet.

4th - The near universal aluminum to aluminum contact between router motor and base is a dreadful combination. Without constant waxing they’re always binding and galling. A little nylon or similar material between these rubbing surfaces would make all the difference yet no one seems able or willing to do a fix.

5th - I could go on but I’ll mention only this one last but SERIOUSLY ANNOYING peeve. Every tool manufacturer that uses stiff plastic power cords should have their CEO blindfolded and shot. Well, maybe a blindfold wouldn’‘t be necessary.

Now you have it. I’ll annoy you no more.


Rod
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post #12 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-14-2010, 05:11 PM
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Rod,

This is what we use at work for long term storage. I'll be honest, its a little messy, but it works.

LPS 3 Premier Rust Inhibitor - LPS Lubricants

Hope this helps.


PS- The site below is how the pros do it.

http://www.evanscoatings.com/

Doug
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Last edited by kp91; 03-14-2010 at 05:22 PM.
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post #13 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-14-2010, 07:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodbetts View Post
Okay guys, here’s the deal. Since I started this thread, I ought to be able to say this w/o upsetting anyone.

First, I really do want to know where I can get some of the router bit wax goop I mentioned in my first posting. I’m hoping someone will come along & give me a lead. I can’t seem to find anything by googeling & I would like to have the real thing.
Doug has hit the nail on the head, below.

Quote:
Second, we’ve gotten off topic. To my knowledge, there are no other shop tool as awkward to setup as are routers. Here’s why:

Quote:
1st - Although there are minor exceptions, most routers will neither stand on their head nor lay peacefully on their side while they’re being setup. If you try to stand them on their heads to change bits, they fall over. If you try to do it with them laying on their side, they roll all over the bench or onto the floor. On most routers, the cords come out of the top making it impossible to stand set them up. Changing bits is a three-handed job in a two-handed world. This would be an easy fix if only router manufacturers would think before they start casting parts.
Put the 7x7 or 11x11 OakPark baseplate on and it will hold the router quite nicely at a reasonable angle to release the collet with the two wrench system.

Quote:
2nd - Another concern is the Porter Cable type template guides that have become standard on most routers. They’re almost impossible to securely lock in place. They’re designed to be hand tightened but when hand tightened, vibrate loose. The only option is to tighten them with Channel-Lock pliers which chews up the rings. Also, if the threads are tight (normal) there’s no way to hold the guide while the ring is being tightened so you can’t tighten them anyway unless you use another pair of pliers which destroys the guides. It would be so simple to design a system that uses a set screw to lock the collets in place, yet no one has gone there.
There are brass and steel template guides. Steel guides are usually provided by router manufacturers because of cost. However, they do garner some support from members here. There are two sizes of brass template guides,
1 3/16 PorterCable size and 1 3/4 OakPark/LeeValley size. I prefer the 1 3/4 brass with a ring nut and tighten slightly more than finger tight.

Quote:
3rd - The small openings in the side of the router base are awkward to use, especially if you’ve misplaced the wrench or wrenches that came with the router (they seem always able to find a places to hide) and you need to use substitutes, such as crescent wrenches. Someone needs to design a base with a flip-up bottom that can be tilted out of the way for better access - not a difficult task I shouldn’t think.
I'm not going to touch that one.

Quote:
All routers should have a shaft locking slide on the side of the router otherwise you need one hand to hold the router, another hand to push in a strongly springed shaft locking button and then, of course, your third hand to turn the router collet lock nut wrench. All this could be avoided by making the armature shaft a little larger, running a collet locking bolt up through the shaft that could be loosened or tightened from above. Simple enough but no one’s been there yet.
Use the OakPark baseplate and two wrenches. It takes one hand. The shaft lock requires 4 hands to tighten and three to release the collet.

Quote:
4th - The near universal aluminum to aluminum contact between router motor and base is a dreadful combination. Without constant waxing they’re always binding and galling. A little nylon or similar material between these rubbing surfaces would make all the difference yet no one seems able or willing to do a fix.
My M12V is steel on brass, I think. The base is magnesium alloy, the columns are steel and there are bronze? bearing inserts inside the column receivers.

Quote:
5th - I could go on but I’ll mention only this one last but SERIOUSLY ANNOYING peeve. Every tool manufacturer that uses stiff plastic power cords should have their CEO blindfolded and shot. Well, maybe a blindfold wouldn’‘t be necessary.
Quote:
Isn't it amazing how they can cheapen a tool by a cord.

Now you have it. I’ll annoy you no more.
Well, you haven't even started. In fact, you've contributed handsomely and I thank you for it.

Allthunbs
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post #14 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-14-2010, 08:05 PM
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Hi Rod

It comes down to what type of router you are trying to use, the Craftsman has though it ,almost all of the way.
The PC is still behind the times on many items..

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/search_10...rs&vName=Tools

If you make a call to MLCS I sure they will give you a name of the "bit wax goop company " they just may have some it stock, I'm sure they get bits back and need to re-dip them..

Guides,,if you use the MileCraft plate you can change the guides in a snap and because the quick turn insert it's off the machine it's easy to lock the ring nut if you still have a error they sale a wave washer that will do the job.

Lock pin, is the best way one hand to hold the lock pin in place and one hand for the wrench, many come with a way to put on 2 wrench's if you want to use it that way.
But using the offset wrench is the best way if the router is in the router table.
Aging it come down to what type of router you have and want to use.

" small openings " many of the routers ,the motor will just slide out to make it easy to work on them and stand them on it's top.

" stiff plastic power cords " many don't ,if it's from over the pond it may have..

http://mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_...waxcoat_anchor

" The Protective Wax Coating On Router Bits

Q: What is that clear coating / protective coating on my bits and how do I remove it?
A: Most MLCS bits are coated with a protective wax coating to defend against chipping and moisture. This coating should be removed prior to use. The coating can be removed by peeling it away with your fingernail or a razor blade. If using a blade, please be careful, both for your own safety and to avoid damaging the carbide."


========

Quote:
Originally Posted by rodbetts View Post
Okay guys, here’s the deal. Since I started this thread, I ought to be able to say this w/o upsetting anyone.

First, I really do want to know where I can get some of the router bit wax goop I mentioned in my first posting. I’m hoping someone will come along & give me a lead. I can’t seem to find anything by googeling & I would like to have the real thing.



Second, we’ve gotten off topic. To my knowledge, there are no other shop tool as awkward to setup as are routers. Here’s why:


1st - Although there are minor exceptions, most routers will neither stand on their head nor lay peacefully on their side while they’re being setup. If you try to stand them on their heads to change bits, they fall over. If you try to do it with them laying on their side, they roll all over the bench or onto the floor. On most routers, the cords come out of the top making it impossible to stand set them up. Changing bits is a three-handed job in a two-handed world. This would be an easy fix if only router manufacturers would think before they start casting parts.

2nd - Another concern is the Porter Cable type template guides that have become standard on most routers. They’re almost impossible to securely lock in place. They’re designed to be hand tightened but when hand tightened, vibrate loose. The only option is to tighten them with Channel-Lock pliers which chews up the rings. Also, if the threads are tight (normal) there’s no way to hold the guide while the ring is being tightened so you can’t tighten them anyway unless you use another pair of pliers which destroys the guides. It would be so simple to design a system that uses a set screw to lock the collets in place, yet no one has gone there.

3rd - The small openings in the side of the router base are awkward to use, especially if you’ve misplaced the wrench or wrenches that came with the router (they seem always able to find a places to hide) and you need to use substitutes, such as crescent wrenches. Someone needs to design a base with a flip-up bottom that can be tilted out of the way for better access - not a difficult task I shouldn’t think.

All routers should have a shaft locking slide on the side of the router otherwise you need one hand to hold the router, another hand to push in a strongly springed shaft locking button and then, of course, your third hand to turn the router collet lock nut wrench. All this could be avoided by making the armature shaft a little larger, running a collet locking bolt up through the shaft that could be loosened or tightened from above. Simple enough but no one’s been there yet.

4th - The near universal aluminum to aluminum contact between router motor and base is a dreadful combination. Without constant waxing they’re always binding and galling. A little nylon or similar material between these rubbing surfaces would make all the difference yet no one seems able or willing to do a fix.

5th - I could go on but I’ll mention only this one last but SERIOUSLY ANNOYING peeve. Every tool manufacturer that uses stiff plastic power cords should have their CEO blindfolded and shot. Well, maybe a blindfold wouldn’‘t be necessary.

Now you have it. I’ll annoy you no more.


Rod



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Last edited by bobj3; 03-14-2010 at 10:04 PM.
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post #15 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-14-2010, 08:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodbetts View Post
Can anyone tell me what the wax that the sharpening folks use to coat resharpened router bits & saw blades with is called & where I can get some?

Thx.

Rod Betts
Hey Rod, since you INSIST that we stay on the original topic...

I don't know where you can get the same stuff, maybe at a tool shop or something similar? What might work for you is stuff called (I think) Plas-dip. I've seen it at the BORG in the past in the tool coral. If colour is an issue, I've only seen it in black, but it's for dipping tool handles in. It leaves a rubber coating behind.

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post #16 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-14-2010, 09:27 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the info guys. I'll check them out & let you know what I find.

Rod
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post #17 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-14-2010, 09:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodbetts View Post
Can anyone tell me what the wax that the sharpening folks use to coat resharpened router bits & saw blades with is called & where I can get some?

Thx.

Rod Betts
Hi Rod - Not sure but I am guessing this is the kinda stuff you are asking about. Suspect it is gonna be priced for shops though.
Hot melt strippable dip coatings & melting tanks from Evans Coatings - Detroit area, Michigan

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post #18 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-17-2010, 02:00 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all your help guys. I'm aware of most all the suggested remedies. I bought a MileCraft router plate a while ago but it seems so frail (especially the inserts), I've never installed it so it sits on a shelf. I've pretty much given up on Craftsman. Over the years, I've had too many failures with they're electrical tools. It seems like everyone else is cheapening up their stuff so maybe now they're no worse than others. I can't think of a tool brand that I've not been disappointed with at some time or other.

The guy at MLCS either didn't know or wouldn't say where I could get the router coating goop. I've sent an email asking about the Hot Melt Type I Wax. I haven't had a response yet but fear they'll want to sell it in 55 gallon drums.

I know there are routers available that have fixed some of the problems I've mentioned but none of them have fixed them all, or for that matter, as far as I know, even more than one on any given model. Besides, why should we have to spend all that extra money to fix things that should have been built right in the first place? So far, I think my system works best. Buy routers cheap on eBay (so what if they're not new) set them up in the more commonly used setups & then leave them setup. Heck, I could buy at least two additional routers for the same money it would cost me to buy all those desirable router trinkets. Even if you have to throw one away once in a while, you might still be ahead and it's sure nice to pick up a router, turn it on, route, and then put it back on the shelf when done.

Regards,

Rod Betts
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post #19 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-17-2010, 02:41 PM
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I wonder if you emailed one of the companies that does sharpening of saw blades what they use to coat blades with if they would be helpful?
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post #20 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-17-2010, 04:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodbetts View Post
The guy at MLCS either didn't know or wouldn't say where I could get the router coating goop. I've sent an email asking about the Hot Melt Type I Wax.
[/QUOTE]

Rod:

Evans Coatings have a toll free number. Just give them a call.

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