Straight Router Cuts-Does my router just suck? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-15-2013, 10:21 PM Thread Starter
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Default Straight Router Cuts-Does my router just suck?

Hey all,

I'm brand new here to this forum and I need some help. Right now I'm building longboards (bigger skateboards). One feature these boards have that traditional skateboards don't have is called wheel wells. They look like this:
(First Image)
Here is a video of how wheel wells like that are made:
youtube--> /watch?v=xniO0CwiqxM
(I guess I can't post links until I have 10 posts).
Now the way I'm trying to accomplish this is by using a router with a straight bit (1/2" diameter, 1" cut length) and for my router I'm using this:
(Second Image)
It's the Black and Decker Matrix system with the router attachment. I know this is not a designated router and is most likely making you folks want to pull your hair out. Please bear with me for a moment. This is my progress:
(Third Image)
Whenever I try to start a cut (if that's what it's called?) or whatever the term is, I get massive amounts of kick back from the router and it's hardly controllable. The best I've been able to manage so far is quick little attempts, hence the random jabbing scars.
So here's my question to you, what am I doing wrong? I'm not using a fence or guide so I know that may be helpful. Also, I'm not using a bushing on the router. I've read that could help but I'm not exactly sure how. Does my router just suck? Is it not going fast enough and that's why it's getting stuck and kicking back? Will I have to get a new one?

Any help you could give me would help me immensely.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-18-2013, 08:02 AM
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They may call that a router attachment but it is NOT a router. A router spins at 20K rpm and no way that drill can do that. That is your first problem, you need to buy a router that accepts guide bushings. You can find one of the newer small Craftsman routers at Sears for about $60 or a better choice is to buy a combo kit for about $100. (see photo) If you only have one router it should be a plunge router but the combo kits let you switch the motor between the bases to keep the cost lower.

I mentioned guide bushings because you need to follow a template to get accurate repeatable cuts. Making the template is not difficult. Once you have a router and a set of guide bushings we can talk you through this. I prefer the brass guide bushing sets from Woodcraft or Lee Valley.

One other thing, for the best results you should remove the material in passes that are no more than 1/4" deep at a time. You continue this until you reach the full depth of cut.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-18-2013, 10:47 AM
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Mike is right,but even if you were using a router you can not make that cut in 1 pass it is to deep with what you are using you need to make three passes( take shallower cuts )

Last edited by Semipro; 08-18-2013 at 12:23 PM.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-18-2013, 07:01 PM
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Hi, N/a. Welcome to the forum.

Why would B&D even sell something like that? Obviously, preying on the uninformed?

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-02-2013, 11:56 PM
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Hi N/a
yes your router sux, listen to the pro's above
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-03-2013, 01:25 AM
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Please, so that members can give you meaningful] answers, complete you public profile which should include your woodworking experience and available tools.
The way to solve your problem is to make a template with a cutout the shape that you require but larger, and the way to calculate what size to make the cutout is:
diameter of the template guide that you intend to use, minus the diameter of the bit that you intend to use, plus the final routed dimensions, so, if you were to choose a 1.25" guide and a 1/2" bit and the routed dimensions were to be 7" x 2", then the cutout in the template would be: 1.25"-0.5" +7"=7.75" by: 1.25"-0.5"+2"=2.75". Such a template can be made from 3/8" MDF and the cutout can be done with a jig saw then carefully sanded smooth because any irregularities will be transferred to the finished article.
My series "routing for beginners may be of some help if in fact you lack routing experience.
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File Type: pdf Routing for Beginners - Lesson Four.pdf (1.14 MB, 57 views)

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-16-2014, 05:47 PM
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Default for beginners:eek


According to you tutorials a beginner should have a workspace the size of a basement. A work table. Someplace to set up that large jig and an extrodinarly expensive setup.
What is the beginner decides this hobby is not for them.
Not trying to be smart at all so please do not take it that way but I am a beginner and was hoping for a tutorial that I could learn from with the instuments that a beginner would own. I got overwhenmed as it went on. Even a different title othe than "A Beginners". Its a little deceiving. Maybe a beginner to coin trays (which I must say were very handsome) but....well you get my point
An afterthought would be is someone wants to learn how to ride a motorcycle they would have to buy themselves a motorcycle.
I guess I could be wrong. I'm glad I ordered my dog a ramp off of e-bay so he doesnt have to depend on me to get it done
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-16-2014, 09:21 PM
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Hi Lainie

I guess it may seem intimidating when you first start, but as you gain experience, it does get easier.

Harry's tutorials do assume that you have a reasonable sized router. Almost everything else can be done with a basic set of tools.

Hang in there and you will be surprised what can be achieved.

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-16-2014, 09:41 PM
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Lainie it probably does seem at times that you need a shop full of tools to get started but the truth is that almost all of started off with something close to what you have. I've spent just about 40 years building and improving my collection. One of the most important challenges for a beginner is to figure out how to get a job done with the tools you have. In fact, that never really changes because you can always go bigger, more accurate, faster, easier to use, etcetera if you have the room and the money. As you go you'll learn more about what you're capable of and your workmanship will improve. As James said, don't despair.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-17-2014, 06:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laneiam View Post

According to you tutorials a beginner should have a workspace the size of a basement. A work table. Someplace to set up that large jig and an extrodinarly expensive setup.
What is the beginner decides this hobby is not for them.
It's easy to get envious of the great workshops many of the members on here have, but as Chuck says, most are the product of many years or decades, and you can certainly achieve satisfying results without needing to be so well-equipped. I still do most of my work outdoors on a couple of folding workbenches ("workmate"-style things), sometimes with a piece of plywood over the top if I need a larger work area. For many years the only router I had was a store own-brand model with a 1/4" collet and I did a lot of projects with that.

You'll be limited in what you can do to some degree, but the key is working out project designs that you can achieve with what you have. For example, without a thickness planer or table saw you're restricted to the sizes of planed timber you can buy, but if you base your design on standard board sizes it's not a problem. With just a router, a straight cutting bit and a straight-edge, you can make dado and rebate/rabbet joints; you can go a long way with that style of joinery. Pocket screws are another method of joinery that's easy to do with basic equipment (the Kreg mini jig is about $20) and can be used in a lot of situations.

Try not to be overawed by the big, complicated projects you'll sometimes see here and elsewhere. Stick with it and you'll be achieving the same one day
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