Planing/jointing saw mill lumber - Router Forums
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-13-2015, 07:03 PM Thread Starter
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Default Planing/jointing saw mill lumber

For the first time I bought lumber from a guy that has his own saw mill. It is 4/4 Hard Maple and Red Oak. My question is how should I go about squaring the edges/faces? Do I use the planer right away or should the jointer be used first? I really need some experienced advice because I have a lot of money invested in this pile of wood. Please help! Thanks.
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-13-2015, 07:11 PM
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Hi Matt, the way I understand, is that you use the jointer first to get one side and one edge flat and square and then the planer to get the second side flat and parallel with the first side. The saw is then used to make the second edge flat and parallel to the first edge.

The planer and saw cut the lumber to final dimension.

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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-13-2015, 07:26 PM
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Originally Posted by mlrlangley24 View Post
For the first time I bought lumber from a guy that has his own saw mill. It is 4/4 Hard Maple and Red Oak. My question is how should I go about squaring the edges/faces? Do I use the planer right away or should the jointer be used first? I really need some experienced advice because I have a lot of money invested in this pile of wood. Please help! Thanks.
plane 1st...
that is side that will ride against the jointer's fence...
you will also have a clearer view of how much needs doing to the edge..

now joiner a edge and then off to the TS.....

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-13-2015, 08:42 PM
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If the lumber was sawn with a band mill I would probably go Stick's method. If it was sawn with the old style 48"- 52" diameter head saw AND your planer has very short infeed and out feed tables (like some of the lunchbox style ones) then I would go with James' method. The old head saws could really wander in the cuts in hard/frozen woods. I've planed 1000s of board feet of lumber cut by both methods.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-13-2015, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by mlrlangley24 View Post
For the first time I bought lumber from a guy that has his own saw mill. It is 4/4 Hard Maple and Red Oak. My question is how should I go about squaring the edges/faces? Do I use the planer right away or should the jointer be used first? I really need some experienced advice because I have a lot of money invested in this pile of wood. Please help! Thanks.
Is the wood ready to be milled? I never bought it straight from the mill, but I have bought it from the lumber yard where they stock the 4/4 rough lumber that has been skip planed so you can see the grain of the wood.

I guess I am curious about the moisture content. If it was freshly sawed, I have heard where it needs to be stickered and allowed to dry for 1 year per inch of thickness.
---------
what I do...

I usually buy boards up to ten - twelve feet in length and 6 inches or less in width.
Depending on my project needs, I try to figure out a rough cut list so I can cross cut the boards into 4-6 foot lengths.

If the boards are bowed, I use my table saw ripping sled and rip one side straight.

Then I flatten one side on the jointer.

Then with that flat side against the fence, I run the straighten edge across the cutter. Now each board is flat on one side and one edge is flat and 90 deg to the flat side.

Next, I plane the boards to their final thickness. Note that I don't rip them on the table saw before planing because I will most likely be ripping and cutting different widths later.

When planing is complete, I will then turn to the final cutlist and start ripping and cross cutting my pieces. I might add that I usually leave the final length cross cuts until just before assembly so I can make sure I haven't made a mistake or measured wrong. It never hurts to be a little long. My shop doesn't have a board stretcher!

Hope this helps.
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2015, 12:07 AM
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Not taking sides here, just sayin...
The usually quoted rational for first jointing one face first is that planing first simply makes the new finished surface parallel to the not-yet-planed or jointed face, with whatever faults exist now replicated.
ie if the unplaned side has a twist/bow so now does the planed side...no real improvement.
I'm wondering if Stick has left something unsaid about his process?
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2015, 12:35 AM
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Not taking sides here, just sayin...
The usually quoted rational for first jointing one face first is that planing first simply makes the new finished surface parallel to the not-yet-planed or jointed face, with whatever faults exist now replicated.
ie if the unplaned side has a twist/bow so now does the planed side...no real improvement.
I'm wondering if Stick has left something unsaid about his process?
what could that be???

planing 1st shows you what you have...
do sectionals to cull and jointing gets a lot easier...
less waste too...

because of the nature of the beast if you opt to use the router/straight edge/trim bit method the planed surface gives you a decent place to start...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2015, 07:58 AM
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I'm with Stick- I plane first. All my lumber now I've had sawed on a band mill so it's much truer than the old rotary milled. I run the boards thru several times taking thin cuts. Take a couple , flip the board , take a couple etc. this always results in a nicely milled board for me. If a board has twisted, I put it on a carrier board and shim the two high corners between it and the carrier with a spot of hot glue or whatever works and run it thru in small passes. I then rough cut and joint the edges. This way I know that the face and edge will be exactly 90 degrees to each other. If I were to joint the edges first there is a possibility that when planned, it may not end up exactly perpendicular. As far as bows, I rough cut and run the straightest edge thru the jointer. Having a long bed jointer helps to get a straight edge easier.
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2015, 11:03 AM
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My quote..."ie if the unplaned side has a twist/bow so now does the planed side...no real improvement."
I should have been clearer and said 'if the unplaned face etc etc...'
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2015, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlrlangley24 View Post
For the first time I bought lumber from a guy that has his own saw mill. It is 4/4 Hard Maple and Red Oak. My question is how should I go about squaring the edges/faces? Do I use the planer right away or should the jointer be used first? I really need some experienced advice because I have a lot of money invested in this pile of wood. Please help! Thanks.
As you can see from the responses so far, different techniques for different folks--none of them wrong. What's not been mentioned to this point is WHEN to process your stock (besides checking moisture content). Even if the moisture is correct, let the wood acclimate to your shop before beginning your milling. Also, the wood will move after you start jointing/planing/cutting. Because of this movement, i only mill what i need for a given project (plus some extra since there will be an error!!). If it's a small project, i run pretty close or dead on the finished dimensions if i'm using it in a day or two. For larger projects that will take weeks (i'm slow), i mill in two steps--first just to clean up, probably taking off about half of what's coming off. Then i wait a few days, at times as much as a week if that's the next time i have, then mill to finished size.

I've got a pretty good stash of old cut cherry and white oak that stay pretty stable when milled. But i've got a bunch of poplar that is also about 25 years since rough cutting and that stuff tends to wander like a rabbit dog on a scent!! If you want to do some preliminary milling--you may want to consider "skip planing" so you can better see the grain and color of the pieces when picking for a project later. I keep meaning to do that but when i can get out to the shop i've usually got a project to work on so i'm rarely out in my "spare time".

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