Cutting and fitting 45 deg. miter ends - Router Forums
 11Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 07:51 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,583
 
Question Cutting and fitting 45 deg. miter ends

I have a couple of projects in mind. My dilemma is how to make trim or wood, cut at a 45 deg. angle and have them meet precisely the right length. This would be like trimming a table top or box with another type of wood. Is there a trick to making them the same lengths and fitting without a lot of trimming. Recommended way to cut? Am I making sense?

John T.
Equestrians are stable people.
Knothead47 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 09:08 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 28,923
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knothead47 View Post
I have a couple of projects in mind. My dilemma is how to make trim or wood, cut at a 45 deg. angle and have them meet precisely the right length. This would be like trimming a table top or box with another type of wood. Is there a trick to making them the same lengths and fitting without a lot of trimming. Recommended way to cut? Am I making sense?
rough cut to size...
use a shooting board final ....
I love my miter knife...

Attached Files
File Type: pdf Shooting Board 3.pdf (57.0 KB, 128 views)
File Type: pdf Shooting Board 2.pdf (1.94 MB, 174 views)

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 09:13 AM
Moderation Team
 
BrianS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Country: Canada
First Name: Brian
Posts: 2,413
 
Send a message via Skype™ to BrianS
Default

I've only had success by the "trial and error" method. Cut one to fit, and slowly sneak up to a fit with the other piece, one shave at a time. I have seen some people use the "shooting board" method, but I've not tried it myself.

Brian


Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on
or by imbeciles who really mean it.

(Origin uncertain)
BrianS is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 09:43 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,583
 
Default

stick486, I'm impressed with the links. Several years ago, I helped my brother-in-law trim out a pantry that he got for his kitchen; it was to match is cabinetry. It was a bear trying to get the ends to meet precisely at the corners, both inside and outside.

John T.
Equestrians are stable people.
Knothead47 is offline  
post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 09:54 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,905
 
Default

If the angles are both 45* and the boards are exactly the same thickness, then the heels and tips will match perfectly. If you are making a frame then the opposing sides also have to be the same lengths. The theory is simple. Getting it to work is harder.

One of the problems with using a saw is that the blade will deflect as it passes through late summer layers of wood. I've had better results when I used blade stiffeners with a good blade.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is online now  
post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 09:54 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Herb Stoops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Herb
Posts: 8,061
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knothead47 View Post
stick486, I'm impressed with the links. Several years ago, I helped my brother-in-law trim out a pantry that he got for his kitchen; it was to match is cabinetry. It was a bear trying to get the ends to meet precisely at the corners, both inside and outside.
That might be because the corners were just a tad out of square,as in most house construction. A sanding block with 40 grit cloth on it is handy to make adjustments on the spot to hand fit these joints.

On furniture it is a little different as the tolerances are tighter,and if care is taken in the build, for squareness, then less adjustment has to be made.

Herb
Herb Stoops is offline  
post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 10:41 AM
Retired Moderator
 
TwoSkies57's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Bill
Posts: 6,028
   
Default

Best ways to get it right the first time for me:
Favorite would be sneaking up on the miter with a shooting board.. SB has to be set up dead on..
Easiest would be sneaking up on the miter with a 12" disc sander. Jig for sander needs to be dead on..
Nice to have both with adjustable features...
When its just a lil bit of tweakin' required, a block with 100grit works for me..
I get my best results by working my way around, one corner at a time..

then sometimes ya just say AHHHHHHHHHH CRAP!!

I'd say that even one of those 6" disc /48" belt sander combo's would work well enough with the right kind of jig. The jig needs to be
rigid enough to hold the angle and even then a lil practice goes a long way. With the inside edge of miter resting against the
disc, apply a little pressure one way or the other to zero it in..
bcfunburst likes this.

"..... limited only by imagination"

"Just smile and wave boys, smile and wave"
Skipper the Penguin

Last edited by TwoSkies57; 07-17-2015 at 10:53 AM.
TwoSkies57 is offline  
post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 11:17 AM
Contributor of the Month
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Jim
Posts: 869
 
Default

A well adjusted miter saw should do it.
JIMMIEM is offline  
post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 11:35 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,583
 
Default

Herb, should have explained in more detail. The pantry was attached to the end of existing cabinetry; we were cutting crown mold. It had one inside angle from the wall cabinet to the pantry; two outside angles on the top trim as the pantry was 24 inches deep.
If the wood isn't real thick, could a router with a 45 deg. bit work?

John T.
Equestrians are stable people.
Knothead47 is offline  
post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 07-17-2015, 12:21 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 28,923
 
Default

cope the insides and a miter trim knife...
there's nothing like it..

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome