Template routing small pieces without breaking - Router Forums
 7Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 07:02 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Country: Greece
First Name: N/a
Posts: 4
 
Default Template routing small pieces without breaking

Hello everyone!

I am a hobbyist woodworker and relatively new to routing.
I am trying to make a wooden part at the router table but I hit the wall every time!

I try to template route a small part (6mm - 1/4") using a Bosch straight flush trim bit (6mm diameter). Every time I try to route the edge, the bit catches and breaks the edge... I tried supporting the edge from the opposite direction of routing with wooden jigs but no success.

You can see the piece in the attached image (made with a jigsaw and a lot of sanding).

Any ideas or suggestions?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20160831_133249.jpg
Views:	208
Size:	582.9 KB
ID:	232450  

rogtek is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 09:42 AM
Honored Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Country: United States
First Name: pat
Posts: 1,053
 
Default

That ear produces short grain, a very vulnerable and weak section of the sample. If you take this cut in stages, say 1/16" - 3/32"/pass (in thickness), then the side load trying to break the part, is substantial reduced. You stand a better chance if you take the waste in 4 or 5 passes.
Templetizing this sample to prevent the failure, unless making 100's, will not be worth time.
Quillman is offline  
post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 09:52 AM
Honored Member
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,469
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rogtek View Post
Hello everyone!

I am a hobbyist woodworker and relatively new to routing.
I am trying to make a wooden part at the router table but I hit the wall every time!

I try to template route a small part (6mm - 1/4") using a Bosch straight flush trim bit (6mm diameter). Every time I try to route the edge, the bit catches and breaks the edge... I tried supporting the edge from the opposite direction of routing with wooden jigs but no success.

You can see the piece in the attached image (made with a jigsaw and a lot of sanding).

Any ideas or suggestions?
There will always be a weakness using wood, is there any reason why you can't use MDF, preferably Melamine coated like the piece shown in the photo.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2ndbalancer2.jpg
Views:	88
Size:	214.1 KB
ID:	232458  


Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 11:38 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Country: Greece
First Name: N/a
Posts: 4
 
Default

Thanks for your replies but...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quillman View Post
That ear produces short grain, a very vulnerable and weak section of the sample. If you take this cut in stages, say 1/16" - 3/32"/pass (in thickness), then the side load trying to break the part, is substantial reduced. You stand a better chance if you take the waste in 4 or 5 passes.
Templetizing this sample to prevent the failure, unless making 100's, will not be worth time.
This sample is made from pine which is very soft and the grain isn't oriented correctly. The final piece will be made from beech which is much harder and the grain is oriented correctly but I still get the same results. The problem is that I can't make fine passes by hand because the part is very small. If you are off by a fraction it breaks. As for the templating, I plan to make about 50 of them, but the real problem is that I can't make them identical to each other without templating.

As for the material used, I want to use only solid wood. If I manage a way, besides beech I am planning to make a few from walnut.

I am going to try to make a pass so that the cutter is oriented TO the wood from the one side and then switch the template upside down so that I can route the other side. But unfortunately the problem remains at the top.
rogtek is offline  
post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 12:33 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 25,276
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rogtek View Post
Hello everyone!

I am a hobbyist woodworker and relatively new to routing.
I am trying to make a wooden part at the router table but I hit the wall every time!

I try to template route a small part (6mm - 1/4") using a Bosch straight flush trim bit (6mm diameter). Every time I try to route the edge, the bit catches and breaks the edge... I tried supporting the edge from the opposite direction of routing with wooden jigs but no success.

You can see the piece in the attached image (made with a jigsaw and a lot of sanding).

Any ideas or suggestions?
this can explain it better than I can...
Attached Files
File Type: pdf GRAIN DIRECTION AND STRENGTH.pdf (186.7 KB, 91 views)
harrysin and firstmuller like this.

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 02:32 PM
Honored Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Country: United States
First Name: pat
Posts: 1,053
 
Default

Don't understand: " The problem is that I can't make fine passes by hand because the part is very small."
**************************************************
What's the size of the work have to do with depth of cut?
Quillman is offline  
post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 03:36 PM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 16,287
 
Default

Ok, a little different approach, since you're making 50 of them.

Route the shape in a long piece, or if you need a different grain orientation, cut the same profile in several short pieces. You'll wind up with what looks like a piece of molding. Then cut off pieces with a narrow kerf blade for your final result. Make the length at least twice what you think you'll need so you have some backup. Support the back of the piece with a sacrificial fence so that the cutoff piece is supported as the saw goes through. Still, I'd expect a number of pieces just won't make it--it's wood! Making these one off is not practical.
rjtwin501 and chuckgray like this.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 04:33 PM
Registered User
 
paduke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Bill
Posts: 1,184
 
Default

I have been templating "2" high alphabet letters I have been using a 1/4" upcut spiral bit. The material is oak. 1/4" thick. I must use the scroll saw to remove waste to within a 1/16" There are still portions of some letters that I must scroll saw to complete. I break a few but it can be done

Learning is an exciting adventure
paduke is offline  
post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 04:48 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Country: Greece
First Name: N/a
Posts: 4
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quillman View Post
Don't understand: " The problem is that I can't make fine passes by hand because the part is very small."
**************************************************
What's the size of the work have to do with depth of cut?
An image may show the problem better. As you can see I can't feed the piece in the router bit because it's very thin. It's a matter of luck if you can make contact with the bit in a way that it won't rip the edge. I also noticed that by cutting the piece so that the grain follows the right direction, doesn't help much. The speed of the router bit is no match for this piece of wood...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20160831_220105.jpg
Views:	93
Size:	686.3 KB
ID:	232482  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20160831_220129.jpg
Views:	114
Size:	614.3 KB
ID:	232490  

rogtek is offline  
post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-31-2016, 05:26 PM
Registered User
 
hawkeye10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Country: United States
First Name: Don
Posts: 2,603
 
Default

I see you have made a router table and that is good. You might make the hole smaller so it will support that small piece better. Also try using some double stick tape and attach another board under you project for more support. Plywood would be good. A hair dryer or heat gun will make the tape easier to get off. Just throwing out a few suggestions.
JFPNCM, MEBCWD and jj777746 like this.

Don in Murfreesboro,Tn.

Measure once cut twice and it's still to short.
hawkeye10 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Videos: Cutting small pieces Safely Gaffboat Tools and Woodworking 9 09-05-2014 08:44 AM
Feed Ddirection/Safe handling when template routing on the table? fleetinglyshort Table-mounted Routing 5 03-13-2014 12:20 PM
routing a small oval Thomas0668 General Routing 17 09-24-2012 03:02 PM
routing small pieces zxxer12 General Routing 9 03-21-2005 04:40 PM
Advanced (?) Template Routing billdcon Jigs and Fixtures 6 03-09-2005 01:07 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome