Repeated half lap using a router table - Router Forums
 4Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-31-2016, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
First Name: Jeremy
Posts: 3
 
Default Repeated half lap using a router table

I'm just getting back into woodworking and have a new router and router table. I'm building a stand for cub scout adventure belt loops.

Horizontal pieces will be about 3/8 inch thick and will be held by a center support piece going vertical. I want to dado or half-lap just that vertical piece so the 3/8 think horizontals sit flush. There will be 5 horizontal pieces.

Roughly similar to the photo attached, but nicer.

I don't have a very accurate table saw and no dado set for it, so I want to use the router table. I'm struggling to find something online that will work, to do this evenly several times without a ton of setup or measuring.

Advice greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	0831141510.jpg
Views:	521
Size:	214.3 KB
ID:	251066  

jcmilam is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-31-2016, 07:56 PM
Honored Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Country: United States
First Name: pat
Posts: 1,053
 
Default

I would not do this on the router table.
Everything will tearout without edge back up.
At least you can do some back-clamping with hand routing.
Moreover, I know of nothing in routing that doesn't require careful
measuring & setup. It's the nature of Routerdom.
Get some right angled fixtures and verify them to be 90°.
Clamp them to the work and rout the space x 1/2 thickness.
If you use the x-piece to space the guides, you can use a flush trimmer to rout the space.
The nuance of the rout may take an afternoon or more.
Use scrap. Nuthin's easy or fast if done well.
But the extremely talented will get the hang of it quickly.
Not me, took all day to figure the nuance.
Quillman is offline  
post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-31-2016, 08:37 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,001
 
Default

Much like what Pat says. Your best bet is probably to put the crosspieces on one at a time and scribe where they cross. Then clamp a board against the scribe line and use a bearing guided mortising bit which will ride against the board. That could give you a pretty good fit.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-31-2016, 09:49 PM
Registered User
 
furboo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Country: United States
First Name: Rob
Posts: 544
 
Default

Great advice, Jeremy. You might also try a shallow cut, rather than the full depth on the first pass.

Very nice idea for a project.

Rob

Last edited by furboo; 12-31-2016 at 09:51 PM.
furboo is offline  
post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-31-2016, 10:24 PM
Official Greeter
 
old55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Country: Australia
First Name: Ross
Posts: 6,565
 
Default

Welcome with your first post Jeremy.

Ross,
Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia


Enjoy the knowledge of others that can be found within.

‘Members are requested to add a first name in their profile as we are a very friendly bunch here'.
old55 is offline  
post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-01-2017, 02:21 AM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 16,105
 
Default

Start by making an exact width dado jig. Pretty simple to make if you look it up on YouTube.

Assuming you're using pre cut material, you'll line up 6 pieces. Find the center of the length. and then center a cross piece on that and mark the width. You'll use this marked piece to guide the dado jig to cut the center groove in all the rest of the pieces at one time. Clamp all six pieces together carefully and using an accurate square, align the jig 90 to the six pieces. Add a sacrifical piece to each side of the bundle to prevent chip out. Set the bit to cut to an appropriate dept, probably no more than 1/3rd the thickness of the work pieces.

Clamp everything up carefully while checking that everything is square and aligned. Clamp the jig in place and adjust it to exact width of the work pieces.

Make passes with a Mortising bit with a bearing.

Remove one piece from the pack which will become your vertical center piece. Position the remaining fice cross pieces on the center stick, moving them until you have the spacing you want. Mark their position, then set up the exact fit router jig (already pre-set for width. You will want to put in some mdf on each side of the center stick to present tearout, but also to add width to attach the jig. I would consider setting up an outrigger pair of sticks near the ends of the jig for added stabillity. Clamp down, rout the groove (2-3 passes) about 1/3rd the thickness of the piece.
I notice the 5 sticks stand proud a little bit, thus you won't cut to half the thickness.

Unclamp the jig, but not the workpiece, reposition to your marks, clamp, cut. and repeat for the remaining cross pieces.

If you've done this right, you will have a tight fitting, flat bottomed grove you can glue up, then use a decorative tie.

Another method using a pull saw, chisel and rabbit plane

Mark pretty much as discussed but also mark your desired depth as well. Being careful, use the pull saw across the workpiece and cut to just shy of the depth mark. I'd use an engineer's square to guide the saw. Cut carefully to the depth mark. Cut both edges of the groove (probably 10-12 pulls each cut), then make a number of cuts in between. Use a chisel to roughly clean out the cut, then a rabbit plane to flatten the bottom. I'd use a much wider piece of material to cut grooves, then rip the five cross pieces from that. The cross pieces only have one groove, the other, center piece has five grooves, but one is centered so you can cut it with the rest.
If this is being made of pine, I'd consider taking a good, 5 foot long 1x5.5, cutting it in half and gluing it into a panel wide enough to cut 6 pieces from. If you have the plane, a decent pull saw and sharp chisels, I'd probably just do it by hand. You'll also need a marking gauge to have a uniform depth mark. the pine will be easy to work with and you can generally find a decent 5 ft length of 3/4 pine.

You could also use a router plane to flatten the bottom, if you have one. It will give you greater accuracy on the depth of the groove.

OK, that's my take.
jw2170 likes this.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.

Last edited by DesertRatTom; 01-01-2017 at 02:25 AM.
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-01-2017, 09:50 AM
Registered User
 
Everend's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Everend
Posts: 384
 
Default

can you cut the half laps before cutting each piece to size? So if you are starting with a 1x6, cut the half laps before ripping the board down to final width. This way you can cut the half lap on several pieces at the same time and the wider workpiece will be more stable. If you have a miter guage or crosscut sled, score the edges of the half laps there, then clean up the waist between your table saw cuts with the router. Depending on your setup, you may have an easier time setting up support blocks on your table saw so you get the clean edge there.
DesertRatTom likes this.
Everend is offline  
post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-01-2017, 11:15 AM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 16,105
 
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Everend View Post
can you cut the half laps before cutting each piece to size? So if you are starting with a 1x6, cut the half laps before ripping the board down to final width. This way you can cut the half lap on several pieces at the same time and the wider workpiece will be more stable. If you have a miter guage or crosscut sled, score the edges of the half laps there, then clean up the waist between your table saw cuts with the router. Depending on your setup, you may have an easier time setting up support blocks on your table saw so you get the clean edge there.
You can do that, yes. But make sure the board is quite flat, particularly no twist.

You said your table saw wasn't great, but if you have a blade that cuts a flat bottom to the groove, you could do this on a sled. Carefully mark the correct width of the cuts, then "sneak up" on the full width of the groove making repeated passes. If the bottom isn't flat, you could go over it with a rabbit plane or sandpaper attached to the narrow edge of a wood block--although sandpaper is likely to round over the edges a bit. which likely won't matter much if the bottom is really flat.

Theoretically, you could do the sneak up method on a sliding miter with the depth stop set to give you the correct depth. You will need a cross cut blade with flat top teeth, or cut with an ordinary blade a little shallow and clean up with a rabbit plane or router. You might get away with flattening with a very sharp chisel, but it's unlikely to produce a flat bottom. If the bottom isn't perfectly flat on every groove, the five cross pieces won't line up straight so they'll appear cattywampus.

A router plane would be a great solution for the cleanout because it will produce a bottom that is consistently flat and parallel to the top surface on every piece, and they are fun to use. Makes you feel like a serious woodworker

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-01-2017, 12:39 PM
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,475
 
Default

Never thought of using the router for a half lap. Me? I mark where the cut will be, run it through the TS, cutting the outsides first. Then, I repeat the passes on the TS. I either move the wood back and forth or use a wood chisel to clean it up.
Note: This is all done very carefully.
DesertRatTom likes this.

John T.
Life is like water-skiing; if you slow down, you go down.
Knothead47 is offline  
post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-01-2017, 01:04 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
First Name: Jeremy
Posts: 3
 
Default Thanks!

OP here, thanks all. Lots to think about. I'll reread everything later today and decide which way I want to try. If I decide to use the router handheld with a wood piece clamped on top and lined up with where I need to rout (as described in the first few replies) this would be the correct type/size bit, correct?

(I can't post a url)

Freud 50-116 Top Bearing Flush Trim Router Bit, 3/4" Diameter by 1" Carbide Cutting Length 1/2" Shank

Amazon: Freud-50-116-Bearing-Diameter-Carbide
jcmilam is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fold down router table Gaffboat Table-mounted Routing 21 09-09-2018 07:41 PM
Advice on buying a router table with special requirements bikemaniac Table-mounted Routing 10 10-22-2016 05:07 AM
Dust Collection on Table Saw Router Table Extension Guitarman1 Table-mounted Routing 0 10-02-2011 03:32 PM
Router table ideas Larwyn Table-mounted Routing 4 12-28-2009 02:47 AM
How do I mount a Router to a table demaX Table-mounted Routing 3 04-16-2009 07:56 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome