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-   -   Newbie question-- 3/8 cove bit use. (https://www.routerforums.com/table-mounted-routing/106817-newbie-question-3-8-cove-bit-use.html)

curly5759 01-11-2017 10:37 PM

Newbie question-- 3/8 cove bit use.
 
Hi, I am finally trying my hand at using the router on the table. I have an older craftsman router and table inherited from my FIL. Once I improve my skills a bit, I will be upgrading to a better table and router set up. Right now I am making a box that houses a gameboard. I've made LOTS of mistakes, but I have been able to correct most of them.

The lid of the box is supposed to have a roundover on the lower edge, the plans don't spec a size. I am trying to use a 3/8 cove bit without a bearing. I tried the cove bit with a bearing, but couldn't figure out where the bearing should touch. Anyway, I ran a couple of practice passes at various bit heights and noticed an inconsistent cut and a lot of roughness on the cut. The wood seemed to move away from the infeed side of the fence as well. I didn't have that trouble with the rabbet and dado cuts I made. I am feeding in the correct direction.

The router has a 1 piece wood fence (made by FIL). Does the fence need to be 2 pieces and staggered on each side of the bit? (Outfeed fence a bit further forward)
BTW, the wood is pine, 3/4 x 2" tall.

Thanks,
Curly

MT Stringer 01-11-2017 10:45 PM

A round-over is the opposite of a cove cut. Just saying. A round-over will make the edge smooth. Is that what you are trying to do?

Here is an example---
https://www.amazon.com/MLCS-6352-4-I...ver+router+bit

Round-overs come in different sizes such as 1/8th, 1/4, 3/8 inch, and of course, different shank sizes such as 1/4 inch of 1/2 inch shank.
Hope this helps.

MT Stringer 01-11-2017 10:50 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Two examples.
The first picture is a 1/4 inch round-over that "rounds" the edge.

The second picture is the result of using a cove bit to create a shallow groove...like for the pencils to rest in.
Hope this helps.
Mike

TenGees 01-12-2017 08:18 AM

You might try cutting in a few passes, Tim. You don't need a staggered fence for that kind of cut. Try cutting about an 1/8 of an inch at a time. Are you feeding the wood right to left?

Nickp 01-12-2017 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by curly5759 (Post 1428577)
Hi, I am finally trying my hand at using the router on the table. I have an older craftsman router and table inherited from my FIL. Once I improve my skills a bit, I will be upgrading to a better table and router set up. Right now I am making a box that houses a gameboard. I've made LOTS of mistakes, but I have been able to correct most of them. Mistakes are a good thing...especially when you know you've made them and know how to correct them

The lid of the box is supposed to have a roundover on the lower edge, the plans don't spec a size. I am trying to use a 3/8 cove bit without a bearing. It will be helpful to know which you are trying to use...as Mike suggested

I tried the cove bit with a bearing, but couldn't figure out where the bearing should touch. If you are cutting the full profile, the bearing will provide a consistent cut by riding on the flat surface of the piece you are cutting. If you want to cut a partial profile, or sneak up on a full profile, the bearing would be behind the front face of the fence. The bearing typically does not protrude past the front face of the face...

Anyway, I ran a couple of practice passes at various bit heights and noticed an inconsistent cut and a lot of roughness on the cut. This could be feed rate and possibly grain direction...speed of router may be too slow for the bit.
The wood seemed to move away from the infeed side of the fence as well. I didn't have that trouble with the rabbet and dado cuts I made. I am feeding in the correct direction.

The router has a 1 piece wood fence (made by FIL). Does the fence need to be 2 pieces and staggered on each side of the bit? (Outfeed fence a bit further forward)
BTW, the wood is pine, 3/4 x 2" tall. The only time you would need to offset the outfeed side of a fence is when the bit takes off more of the entire face of the piece than what is riding against the fence...for example, if you were using a straight bit to cut an edge for joining.

Thanks,
Curly

Hope this helps...attach some pics if you can...lots of members willing to help...
...

curly5759 01-15-2017 09:23 PM

Thanks for the replies. I was using the wrong term, I meant a round-over bit, not a cove. I am attaching a couple of pics of my equipment and what I am using.
First, my router with the roundover bit and the fence.
http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u...psudtyo72x.jpg

The roundover with out a bearing.
http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u...psw4hwyqal.jpg

And hard to see, some of the poor cut I got on this piece of pine. The first cut was actually better, but not deep enough to completly round the edge.
http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u...ps348gjmgg.jpg

I was feeding the wood right to left, with the wood laying flat so the bit was cutting the 3/4 edge, and the 1 1/2 inch face was on the table. Should the wood have been turned the other way? (Tall side against the fence).

Curly

Semipro 01-17-2017 11:48 AM

Bump

Semipro 01-17-2017 11:58 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Tim
I think I'd replace that bit find yourself something with carbide and a bearing.

Cherryville Chuck 01-17-2017 01:25 PM

I agree with John. That bit is a very old either Sears or Vermont American HSS (high speed steel) bit with pilot. The pilots were a cheap alternative to a bearing but they would burn themselves into the wood at times, especially soft woods. The steel also does not stay sharp for long. Roundover bits are common and relatively cheap with the 1/4" radius being the most commonly used of all. Get a decent quality one because it is something you'll use a lot if you pursue woodworking. You can set them various ways depending on what you want it to do but the most common setup on a table is to use a straightedge and set the bearing flush to the face of the fence.

The pushing of the piece away from the fence is an indication of either the bit being very dull -or- feeding from left to right which is the wrong direction.

Herb Stoops 01-17-2017 02:47 PM

Chuck is right on. Get rid of that HSS bit and go with the carbide with a ball bearing pilot. Then you can do it with or with out a fence or table.
Herb

MT Stringer 01-17-2017 04:58 PM

Some times, I don't use a fence at all. The bearing does the work. That works if the workpiece is laying flat on the table.

Shop guy 01-17-2017 05:57 PM

Best thing you can do with that bit is throw it away. Now before you try to give it one more chance.

TenGees 01-18-2017 12:05 AM

It looks like something is moving. Is there a lock on the router's height adjustment that's not locked? Is the wood staying tight to the table and fence while making a pass? When you tighten the bit into the chuck, it should not be right to the bottom. Leave a 1/16 to an 1/8 or so from the bottom because many collets won't tighten properly if the bit is bottomed out (dangerous).

I agree with the others who say that is a poor bit but I think you should be getting better results even with that bit, unless it's very dull or gummed up.

curly5759 01-21-2017 12:45 PM

Thanks everyone for the replies. I tried the crappy bit a few more times and trashed it. It seemed to be scraping the wood away instead of a clean cut.( Lots of small divots in the cut area) I was able to get a better cut with the other bit. Now, time for more practice cuts.


Tim

Herb Stoops 01-21-2017 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by curly5759 (Post 1438162)
Thanks everyone for the replies. I tried the crappy bit a few more times and trashed it. It seemed to be scraping the wood away instead of a clean cut.( Lots of small divots in the cut area) I was able to get a better cut with the other bit. Now, time for more practice cuts.


Tim

Tim, the HSS bits dull easily and like to leave burn marks. Also the solid pilot will burn easily and even cause small divots that makes a lumpy cut.
I have some carbides with small brass pilots that I use for tight spots where the ball bearing pilot is too large to get in and out of, but for the most part don't use them for general routing.
Herb


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