Newbie question-- 3/8 cove bit use. - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-11-2017, 10:37 PM Thread Starter
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Default Newbie question-- 3/8 cove bit use.

Hi, I am finally trying my hand at using the router on the table. I have an older craftsman router and table inherited from my FIL. Once I improve my skills a bit, I will be upgrading to a better table and router set up. Right now I am making a box that houses a gameboard. I've made LOTS of mistakes, but I have been able to correct most of them.

The lid of the box is supposed to have a roundover on the lower edge, the plans don't spec a size. I am trying to use a 3/8 cove bit without a bearing. I tried the cove bit with a bearing, but couldn't figure out where the bearing should touch. Anyway, I ran a couple of practice passes at various bit heights and noticed an inconsistent cut and a lot of roughness on the cut. The wood seemed to move away from the infeed side of the fence as well. I didn't have that trouble with the rabbet and dado cuts I made. I am feeding in the correct direction.

The router has a 1 piece wood fence (made by FIL). Does the fence need to be 2 pieces and staggered on each side of the bit? (Outfeed fence a bit further forward)
BTW, the wood is pine, 3/4 x 2" tall.

Thanks,
Curly
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-11-2017, 10:45 PM
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A round-over is the opposite of a cove cut. Just saying. A round-over will make the edge smooth. Is that what you are trying to do?

Here is an example---
https://www.amazon.com/MLCS-6352-4-I...ver+router+bit

Round-overs come in different sizes such as 1/8th, 1/4, 3/8 inch, and of course, different shank sizes such as 1/4 inch of 1/2 inch shank.
Hope this helps.
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-11-2017, 10:50 PM
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Two examples.
The first picture is a 1/4 inch round-over that "rounds" the edge.

The second picture is the result of using a cove bit to create a shallow groove...like for the pencils to rest in.
Hope this helps.
Mike
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 08:18 AM
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You might try cutting in a few passes, Tim. You don't need a staggered fence for that kind of cut. Try cutting about an 1/8 of an inch at a time. Are you feeding the wood right to left?
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 09:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curly5759 View Post
Hi, I am finally trying my hand at using the router on the table. I have an older craftsman router and table inherited from my FIL. Once I improve my skills a bit, I will be upgrading to a better table and router set up. Right now I am making a box that houses a gameboard. I've made LOTS of mistakes, but I have been able to correct most of them. Mistakes are a good thing...especially when you know you've made them and know how to correct them

The lid of the box is supposed to have a roundover on the lower edge, the plans don't spec a size. I am trying to use a 3/8 cove bit without a bearing. It will be helpful to know which you are trying to use...as Mike suggested

I tried the cove bit with a bearing, but couldn't figure out where the bearing should touch. If you are cutting the full profile, the bearing will provide a consistent cut by riding on the flat surface of the piece you are cutting. If you want to cut a partial profile, or sneak up on a full profile, the bearing would be behind the front face of the fence. The bearing typically does not protrude past the front face of the face...

Anyway, I ran a couple of practice passes at various bit heights and noticed an inconsistent cut and a lot of roughness on the cut. This could be feed rate and possibly grain direction...speed of router may be too slow for the bit.
The wood seemed to move away from the infeed side of the fence as well. I didn't have that trouble with the rabbet and dado cuts I made. I am feeding in the correct direction.

The router has a 1 piece wood fence (made by FIL). Does the fence need to be 2 pieces and staggered on each side of the bit? (Outfeed fence a bit further forward)
BTW, the wood is pine, 3/4 x 2" tall. The only time you would need to offset the outfeed side of a fence is when the bit takes off more of the entire face of the piece than what is riding against the fence...for example, if you were using a straight bit to cut an edge for joining.

Thanks,
Curly
Hope this helps...attach some pics if you can...lots of members willing to help...
...
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-15-2017, 09:23 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies. I was using the wrong term, I meant a round-over bit, not a cove. I am attaching a couple of pics of my equipment and what I am using.
First, my router with the roundover bit and the fence.


The roundover with out a bearing.


And hard to see, some of the poor cut I got on this piece of pine. The first cut was actually better, but not deep enough to completly round the edge.


I was feeding the wood right to left, with the wood laying flat so the bit was cutting the 3/4 edge, and the 1 1/2 inch face was on the table. Should the wood have been turned the other way? (Tall side against the fence).

Curly
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 11:48 AM
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 11:58 AM
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Tim
I think I'd replace that bit find yourself something with carbide and a bearing.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 01:25 PM
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I agree with John. That bit is a very old either Sears or Vermont American HSS (high speed steel) bit with pilot. The pilots were a cheap alternative to a bearing but they would burn themselves into the wood at times, especially soft woods. The steel also does not stay sharp for long. Roundover bits are common and relatively cheap with the 1/4" radius being the most commonly used of all. Get a decent quality one because it is something you'll use a lot if you pursue woodworking. You can set them various ways depending on what you want it to do but the most common setup on a table is to use a straightedge and set the bearing flush to the face of the fence.

The pushing of the piece away from the fence is an indication of either the bit being very dull -or- feeding from left to right which is the wrong direction.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 02:47 PM
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Chuck is right on. Get rid of that HSS bit and go with the carbide with a ball bearing pilot. Then you can do it with or with out a fence or table.
Herb
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