Miters - Router or tablesaw - Router Forums
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post #1 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 12:40 AM Thread Starter
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Default Miters - Router or tablesaw

I make boxes and I just watched this video
and it made me think whether I could or should be making my miters on the router table using a 45 deg chamfer bit or V groove bit. At the moment I use my table saw with a digital cube to set the angle of the blade. My miters are good and the boxes end up reasonably square but not perfect.

A lot of people use lock miters on the router table but I'm not sure I want to go down that path. Seems a little tricky.

What do others think?
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post #2 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 02:09 AM
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I think you saw a commercial.

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post #3 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 02:24 AM
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I've used the router table for mitres with great success for many years.
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post #4 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 05:04 AM Thread Starter
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Harry (fellow Aussie) any tips on doing this.

I have a 45 deg V groove bit and a 45 chamfer bit with a bearing. Both capable of miters on 3/4" stock. I think either should work. Do tou have a prefernce? How do you hold your pieces? Flat or vertical? Do you use a hold down jig or push block? Do you have a backing piece to prevent tear out? As mitering removes a complete edge how have you manged the outfeed fence to cater for this?

I'm really keen to try this

EDIT .... Sorry you middle picture does answer a few questions?

PS Theo, I know this was a commercial but I like the concept. I also know he mitered MDF which doesn't have the tear out factor as badly as "normal" timber
I'll have a go at making this and report back but I will use a backing (sacrificial) board.
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post #5 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 06:32 AM
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I've used a v-groove bit on the router table for 1/4" thick stock--really nice for continuous grain boxes.
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post #6 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 07:27 AM
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I do a lot of mitering of boards that are 3/8" to 1/2" thick. I use the tablesaw with a Woodworker II blade that is tilted. Does a pretty good job. I didn't see a stop block on the router table to get all the boards the same length. I have a shop made micro adjuster on the miter gauge the helps in taking off the just the right amount of wood. To prevent tear out I have a backer board attached to the miter gauge. Once I got the gauge set accurate about a year ago I haven't had to change it. Malcolm / Kentucky USA
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post #7 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 08:50 AM
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I've had a chance to noodle on the concept of using the router to cut the miters. Whereas I use the TS to cut them and my concern in my previous reply was cutting to length...now I got the concept that you cut them to the correct length prior to using the router. I would also do a pre-miter to cut away a lot of the waste. I may give this a try. Malcolm / Kentucky USA
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post #8 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 09:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barri View Post
Harry (fellow Aussie) any tips on doing this.

I have a 45 deg V groove bit and a 45 chamfer bit with a bearing. Both capable of miters on 3/4" stock. I think either should work. Do tou have a prefernce? How do you hold your pieces? Flat or vertical? Do you use a hold down jig or push block? Do you have a backing piece to prevent tear out? As mitering removes a complete edge how have you manged the outfeed fence to cater for this?

I'm really keen to try this

EDIT .... Sorry you middle picture does answer a few questions?

PS Theo, I know this was a commercial but I like the concept. I also know he mitered MDF which doesn't have the tear out factor as badly as "normal" timber
I'll have a go at making this and report back but I will use a backing (sacrificial) board.
John, the important thing with this method where narrow pieces (like for boxes) is to have a zero clearance opening in the fence and use a decent size pusher block with 80 grit paper glued to the face to prevent slippage. If the fence and bit are set accurately so that NOTHING is removed from the "point" at the top so the piece at the output of the bit remains the same as the input. The pusher ensures that there is no break-out. I have several 45° bits of different sizes, some with and some without bearings as can be seen in the two pairs of photos. and it doesn't matter which type is used so long as it can be set-up correctly. The beauty of routing a mitre is that the 45° is always accurate, no error can be made compared to a table or even a mitre saw. I have always routed the mitres flat, when I first tried this method it seemed the obvious way, and it worked, so it has never occurred to me to try vertical!
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post #9 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 11:20 AM
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I tried that in the past with good results. At that time, I had only a low powered 1/4" shank router, and a crummy cheap bit. So I didn't develop that as a go-to for those type of cuts. But I'm glad you reminded me of this idea, and wee where I can use it with an upcoming project. Thanks.

It seems I never finish what I
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post #10 of 35 (permalink) Old 01-12-2017, 03:06 PM
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Nice method for box making. I make picture frames so the router won't work, so I use a Grizzly miter trimmer to get exact 45s. Cut near to length, then trim one end (about 1/32 of an inch), then but the other end against a stop block to match length and trim the other end. Important not to make the length more than about 1/16th inch long because the trim should be very thin to produce the best result. But for Boxes, pre cutting length sound like a good way to go.

The only thing is that mitered corners are quite weak, so you'd need splines, biscuits or some other method of reinforcing the corners, not just glue.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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