Router throws board immediately upon entry - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 10:10 AM Thread Starter
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Default Router throws board immediately upon entry

I've used a router table numerous times and I don't consider myself a complete newbie. I tried my hand at template routing a hand plane tote on the router table. I used a hand screw clamp to hold the piece and keep my fingers safe. With and without a starter pin, as soon as I enter the cut, the router immediately kicks the board free from the clamp. Sometimes it kicks both the clamp and the piece of wood.

Interestingly, I was able to freehand route the piece using my trim router. Also, I tried using a 1/4" shank rounder to route the edges after I cleaned it up using a sanding spindle and didn't encounter this problem, although there was some tear out and burning.

Here's some details:
  1. The entire edge of the piece is end grain'
  2. I've used two different routers. A trim router mounted on a small router table and a 1 1/2 Porter Cable Router
  3. Tried two different 1/4" flush trim router bits. A spiral with top bearing and a straight flush trim 1/4" with top and bottom bearings.
  4. Template used is roughly 1/4"
  5. I routed in the correct direction as normal
  6. Ignore the missing bearing on the router bit seen on the photo to the right, it was a cheapie and it blew apart after a throwing the board.

Can anyone explain why I am having this issue on the router table, but not handheld? Also, was the successful roundover just a fluke or is there something inherent about flush trim bits that make them prone to throwing the piece? Finally, is there something about oak, endgrain or the combination of the two that would shoot the board away from me? It doesn't make sense why and it's very frustrating. Thanks in advance.
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Last edited by Joel Eggerhardt; 03-02-2017 at 10:13 AM.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 10:37 AM
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Joel,

You may need to have your starting fulcrum closer to the bit when routing small stock. What you can do is clamp a board closer to the bit, and then swing your stock slowly into the cutter. You can also cut closer to your template line with your bandsaw or scroll saw(or increase the size of your bearing), so the bit can't get too thick of a bite on the stock.

I am so glad you are using a hand-screw clamp instead of trying to do this with your fingers!
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Last edited by kp91; 03-02-2017 at 10:47 AM.
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 10:56 AM
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You aren't feeding into the direction of the router bit, are you? Probably not, but I have to ask... you feed the workpiece AGAINST the rotation of the bit - otherwise the rotation of the bit WILL grab and throw the piece. You also don't want to trap the workpiece between something and the spinning bit (or ANY spinning blade). Bad things happen when you do that.

I've had to rout some small pieces before and it's a daunting thing. I bought the little Small Piece Holder (aptly named!) from Rockler to keep my fingers attached and in one piece: Rockler Small Piece Holder | Rockler Woodworking and Hardware

Don't mean to offend, but for some people, it's counter-intuitive to feed against the rotation of the bit. The Big Arrow on your router table might seem to tell you to feed that way, but it's actually cautioning against it. Generally. You CAN "climb cut" with the direction of the bit, for example, on a cleaning pass after the main cutting is done (to help get rid of some tool marks or burning), but usually it's not recommended and a sure recipe for flying workpieces.

Oh - and end grain is always a pain to rout...

Larry
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Last edited by LDBecker; 03-02-2017 at 10:57 AM. Reason: End grain note
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 11:37 AM
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Joel
Not quite sure why you have kick back, but when I use a pattern on a router table I use a flush trim bit that puts the bearing on top where I can see the pattern and also feel safer to have the bearing on top instead of the bit sticking up in the air
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 02:55 PM
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I would say that the bits are probably hooking the end grain if you are doing everything else correctly. Since you have a spindle sander I would be tempted to just use it or maybe do a little rasp work and then sand.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 03:47 PM
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I agree with a lot of the above comments. I have done plane totes in walnut before. I found that if I start the route in the long grain ,then go around the corner into the end grain then come out of the cut in the long grain,if possible.
When I start the cut, I don't start right on a corner but enough in so the bit will not grab the end grain at the corner. On the radius I take a very shallow cut all the way around on the first cut, then raise the bit 1/16" for the next cut,and so on 1/16' til I have it making the full cut. Sometimes I start with a smaller radius bit and after the whole thing is rounded to depth,go to a larger radius bit, when cutting the radius, Or do the flush cutting with the panel bit and then I set up a couple of trim routers with the radius bits and do the round over on the bench, depends on what I am working on.
Like Semipro ,John says above on the pattern bit, use a bearing that only cuts a small amount and change bearings to a smaller bearing to deepen the cut the next time around. But precutting as mentioned above as close as possible will improve the router experience.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 05:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDBecker View Post
I've had to rout some small pieces before and it's a daunting thing. I bought the little Small Piece Holder (aptly named!) from Rockler to keep my fingers attached and in one piece:
I've routed smallish pieces with no issues. However, my templates/patterns/masters are 1" thick, 2 layers of 1/2" plywood, so I can get a GOOD grip on it. Plus I'm not in to routing pieces much smaller than 6". Hehehe However, I have routed pieces considerably smaller than 6". No way am I going to try to hold my master in that case. Instead I always make a modified master with a handle out each side. A bit weird perhaps, but works like a charm. Never seen anything like that holder, may have to use the basic idea next time I rout something real small.

Forgot to add this. If I were making something like that, I don't think I'd rout it, and I rout almost everything. I'd lay out the pattern on it, cut very close to the line, then sand it to the line. I think that would be easier, faster, and safer.

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Last edited by JOAT; 03-02-2017 at 05:59 PM.
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 07:54 PM
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When this happened to me , I finally figured out my router bit was bent.

Ok I re read and you tried more than one bit . My theory isn't looking good

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 11:11 PM
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Originally Posted by RainMan 2.0 View Post
When this happened to me , I finally figured out my router bit was bent.

Ok, I'll bite - how do you bend a router bit? Not sure I really want to know... must have been something dramatic!
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 11:54 PM
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Ok, I'll bite - how do you bend a router bit? Not sure I really want to know... must have been something dramatic!
Sure was . I had a piece of 1/2" lexan secured to an MDF template , and that puppy caught and went across the room . My hand hurt so bad I was aftaid to look at it , as I thought for sure I lost a few digits .
I had taken away most of the material as best I could , but should have taken off a bit more in spots before I attempted to use the flush mount bit to finish the job.

Here's the culprit here. Making lexan dividers for a car audio rack

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate

Last edited by RainMan 2.0; 03-02-2017 at 11:57 PM.
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