I know it's possible, but how.... - Router Forums
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post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 12:59 PM Thread Starter
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Default I know it's possible, but how....

Router Table Users:

Everyone here knows I use my router for signs; never on the table. Well, a necessity (I believe) is going arise where I need to use my table. "For....." you may ask, waiting for me to get to the point...

I need to use it as a jointer... I have a sign request that is going to require me to put five (maybe 6) of my dog ear fencing pieces together to do the sign below. The vertical lines indicate the boards. I know the last section is not the same width; so don't bother bringing that up (A-Type's) The sign is currently the exact width they've requested. It will have to be adjusted. This is for layout/design purposes. They like what I designed, we're good. Anyway, problem is, I don't know how to use the router this way. No complicated gobbledy gook allowed. Do we have a video here on the forum how to do this, or do I have to go to YouTube and suffer through videos of multiple ways before I find the correct way how to do this? If I have to go to YouTube to find this, please suggest a knowledgeable person to watch instead of being tormented?
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Barb


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post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 01:15 PM
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post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 01:20 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you Al... Shame on me for forgetting Steve. He's one of my favorites! DUH! *face palm*

Barb


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post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 02:07 PM
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More info: when you laminate the pieces together look at the end grain and join with with the curve going up on one with the curve going down on the next and alternate that way. That will help to keep the sign as a whole from curling one way or the other. Use of a slotting cutter on the mating edges and addition of splines will make it stronger if it will be subjected to any weather.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 02:56 PM
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Barb...there is a key point not to forget...you should only router-joint one side of the board. Once router-jointed, square up the other side with the table saw, preferably with a blade that leaves a nice finish...

Also, as you transfer pressure from the infeed side to the outfeed side don't completely lift away from the infeed side...you need to keep some pressure on the infeed...

Maybe you know this already...
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post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 04:05 PM
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I do it with a router, but you'll probably want to go with Steve Ramsey's method, rather than mine.

What I do is mark the piece I need straight. Then I tack a straightedge along that line, then run it thru the router. Gives a nice straight side. Most of my stuff needs parallel sides, so do the other side the same way. A bit tricky getting the straightedge positioned just right, sometime more than one try, but it does come out accurate. I don't have a fence, probably never will, unless it's a piece of 2X4 clamped down, so this works just fine for me.

Actually, the straightedges I use (homemade) are all parallel on each side, so I just rough cut the piece I want to produce, and just rout both sides. Nail holes are never seen in the finished product, they are always inside and out of sight.
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post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 06:00 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickp View Post
you should only router-joint one side of the board. Once router-jointed, square up the other side with the table saw, preferably with a blade that leaves a nice finish...

Also, as you transfer pressure from the infeed side to the outfeed side don't completely lift away from the infeed side...you need to keep some pressure on the infeed...

Maybe you know this already...
Nick, I don't have table saw. I have no choice but to do both sides, really. As for keeping pressure on the infeed, thanks. No, I didn't know that. I've used a table ONCE, and I really didn't use it, Mike did. (We were doing all those wine bottle holders.)

Barb


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post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
More info: when you laminate the pieces together look at the end grain and join with with the curve going up on one with the curve going down on the next and alternate that way. That will help to keep the sign as a whole from curling one way or the other. Use of a slotting cutter on the mating edges and addition of splines will make it stronger if it will be subjected to any weather.
Strictly an inside sign, she said, Chuck, but I will still use that technique. Thanks.
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Barb


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post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 06:44 AM
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Alternating the board grain will keep the sign from curving severely when/if it warps. The sign will become wavy instead, which is better because you will still be able to read the sign, but this is a worst case situation for wood warping. If used inside only, it shouldn't warp at all if finish is applied to seal on both sides and edges. The best choices of wood to minimize warping is wood with straight grain lines running across the narrow dimension of the wood. I have frequently bought wider boards and cut them to remove the center tightly curved pith area to get boards with the straighter across the board grain lines. Quarter sawn wood better achieves this when the boards are cut, but at greater material cost and difficulty to find. I have ripped construction lumber in 1 1/2" wide strips, then turned each strip 90 deg and glued it back together to get the grain the way that I wanted for better stability. This method made some great looking and stable 1 1/2 thick pine table tops that have remained flat for the past 30 + years.

My experience when trying to joint with a router involved using a piece of straight steel angle clamped to the board, positioned so as to remove about 1/16 of an inch of material with a straight bit and router running along the steel angle. We then turned the angle around and did the same for the opposite edge of the board, but this time we set the angle to be parallel with the first edge, and the result was boards with parallel and well jointed edges. It worked much better than I expected it to. I have a jointer in my shop, but used this method when away from my shop and helping a son with a project. I had a saw and router with me, but no jointer, so I came up with this method and it worked much better than I expected it to.

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post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 07:41 AM
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Barb, getting boards parallel cannot be over emphasized. Especially in a multi board glue up.
Theo's method is the simplest but, careful measurement from the freshly jointed side is key.
Plus, you'll need to switch to a pattern bit for the second cut.
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