Help: home made router base for 1617evspk - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-11-2018, 06:47 PM Thread Starter
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Post Help: home made router base for 1617evspk

Hi Guys, new to the forum... so I bought a 1617evspk and want to undertake on building a router table. I want to do my own mounting plate out of 1/4" polycarbonate sheet (i.e. Lexan), two questions: i) what is ideal the 10-24 screws or the M4 screws? , ii) what drill sizes I need to drill the hole and the counterbore hole (sorry, I have googled and can't seem to find a straight answer)?
Thank you for your help, M

Last edited by Mecheverriv; 09-11-2018 at 08:44 PM.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-11-2018, 07:49 PM
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Check the instruction book for the size of the threads in the router itself. That's what you have to match. As an alternative, take one of the screws out of the base on the router and take it to HD and use their sizing samples to determine the size.

Now, do you mean base plate, or mounting plate. A base plate does not go into a table, it stays on the router and is usually oversized to allow you to have more of the base on the workpiece to reduce chances of tipping.

A mounting plate is made for the table. A quarter inch is rather light for a mounting plate. There's a picture of the a mounting plate below, the one I use on my table which has a few particularly nice features. I have a heavier router so my plate is a Woodpecker brand, thicker aluminum than most plates and with a really convenient twist lock mount for the red inserts. Inserts allow you to minimize open space around the bit for better above table dust removal. I also have a heavier router than the 1617. The Bosch is a great router, btw.

If buy a pre made plate (Kreg has one with the twist lock inserts), the holes will be pre drilled. If you make your own, you can use the base plate on the router with a punch to mark the location of the mounting holes. The second image below is how you should drill your mounting holes. Drill size is a little larger than the thread size. Drill a second hole above it a little larger than the cap on the screw (a short bolt actually). The loose fit allows for small errors in drilling.

The mounting plate will be dropped into an opening you cut undersized, then routed out to the plate size to make a "shelf" on which the plate will fit. There's another discussion of that process at https://www.routerforums.com/guide-b...depth-cut.html that may be helpful as you set up your table. Do it the ways suggested, not necessarily the way the poster tried to do it.

You can use several pieces of wood to create a simple pattern to follow to hollow out the hole. Double sided tape will hold the pieces down. I suggest you use two layers for your table. The top can be really good, flat ply, the bottom can be a 3/4 thick MDF, glued together.

Welcome to a great hobby. Nothing like it, and lots of help available here as well.
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-11-2018, 08:47 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you. I meant mounting plate. I am building my own instead of buying a predrilled version for budget reasons. Its a great idea to take the screws with me to HD and ask someone there to guide me.
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-11-2018, 09:02 PM
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use aluminum... 3/8'' thick is forever...
polycarbonate will sag over time...
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-11-2018, 10:39 PM
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The plate may be okay if you take out of the table when you aren't using it, which is usually around 98% of the time. If you are making it then make it as small as possible and still get the router in the hole. The smaller the plate, the stiffer it gets. Quite a few of us just let the plate sit in the table. Gravity does a wonderful job of holding it down. That makes it easy to take out when you want to change bits and the table plate makes a good offset plate when free hand edge profiling. It also makes it easy to take out so that it doesn't encourage sag. Plus it encourages you to remove the bit when you are done. Leaving the bit in the collet for extended periods of time isn't necessarily good for it.

The screws that are in the base plate might be long enough for a 1/4" plate but if they aren't don't guess. Match new longer ones up to the old ones. Putting the wrong screw in will strip the threads in the router and that will cause you headaches.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.

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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-11-2018, 11:19 PM
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Dont use lexan for that plate. It will sag under the weight of the router.

Use aluminium or steel.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-12-2018, 11:09 AM
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My first router table, the mounting plate was 1/2" thick polycarbonate, with a smaller foot print. I did not have issues with it sagging. I agree with the others, 1/4" is too thin, the weight of the router will cause it to sag. My current mounting plate is for 3/8" aluminum, and is integrated into my lift. With the aluminum plate, they are usually ground flat to very tight tolerances, and can hold the weight of your router (and lift if you choose to go that route) without sagging in a standard size opening.

Keep in mind, the mounting plate really is the critical component to your router table. This is what holds the router true to the work piece. If it starts to sag, you won't get accurate cuts with your router table.

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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-12-2018, 11:10 AM
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My first router table, the mounting plate was 1/2" thick polycarbonate, with a smaller foot print. I did not have issues with it sagging. I agree with the others, 1/4" is too thin, the weight of the router will cause it to sag. My current mounting plate is for 3/8" aluminum, and is integrated into my lift. With the aluminum plate, they are usually ground flat to very tight tolerances, and can hold the weight of your router (and lift if you choose to go that route) without sagging in a standard size opening.

Keep in mind, the mounting plate really is the critical component to your router table. This is what holds the router true to the work piece. If it starts to sag, you won't get accurate cuts with your router table.

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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-12-2018, 02:06 PM
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Mecheverriv, I agree with the guys that are concerned about sagging. I had that problem with a hand made 1/4 inch plate and I was only using a light router. On smaller pieces it wasn't noticeable but on longer work the error was quite evident. I always left my router in the table, Chuck's idea of always removing it could have helped.

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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-12-2018, 04:16 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for your comments and ideas. Does anyone know about the drill bit size required to match the Bosch screws? Also, as I am reading your comments, and with budget in mind, I am considering the merits of not having a mouting plate at all, but rather screw it directly to the plywood from the top of the table, with a hole on it. I was thinking of 1/2” ply reinforced by having the 1/2” top resting over a 3/4” ply (with an open hole in the middle for the router itself, any thoughts ln this approach?
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